High Speed Winks Videos and Images by Yan Wang

In Spring 2008, Yan Wang (MIT Class of 2009) took high-speed videos of tiddlywinks shots for the MIT class 2.671, Measurement and Instrumentation, and produced the report, “Determining Angular Velocity of Winks Using High Speed Video”.

The videos were taken using the Phantom 640 high-speed video camera (made by Vision Research) in the Edgerton Center strobe lab at MIT. Individual frames from the videos were converted into pseudo-strobe images using Photoshop CS3’s image stack feature and are shown below. Links to the original videos are provided for each derived image below.

Yan Wang's stroboscopic photo of a wink being potted from around 4-5 inches, taken in Spring 2008

Yan Wang’s stroboscopic photo of a wink being potted from around 4-5 inches, taken in Spring 2008

Potting a wink from about 3 inches from the pot. See original video:

Yan Wang's stroboscopic photo of a wink being potted from right next to the cup, taken in Spring 2008

Yan Wang’s stroboscopic photo of a wink being potted from right next to the cup, taken in Spring 2008

Potting a nurdled wink… in other words, a wink adjacent to the base of the pot. See original video:

Check out an additional (color) high-speed winks shot video (14 MB).

Images and videos are © 2008 Yan Wang. All rights reserved. Images and videos are used on Tiddlywinks.org with permission of Yan Wang.

Also check out Rick Tucker’s 1980 report on strobe tiddlywinks photography.