Magazines and Periodicals Other than Newspapers and School Publications

Updated: 21 July 2022.

Toggle Showing All ReferencesEntries are ordered by publication name.
(unknown, BOAC or British Airways) (magazine)
associated with · 
BOAC/British Airways
location · 
UK
tw-pub-ID · 
562

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for (unknown, BOAC or British Airways).
published in · 
(unknown, BOAC or British Airways)
date · 
1960s or early 1970s
summary

About Prince Philip and tiddlywinks in the Olympics.

notes · 
Mentioned in NATwA’s Missing Wink, November 1976, pages 5, 9.
notability rating · 
potentially interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2371
Accountancy (magazine)
location · 
UK
tw-pub-ID · 
534

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Accountancy.
published in · 
Accountancy
date · 
April 1988
title · 
Wink Wink
citation · 
section People
media type · 
photograph
media description

Photograph of Jonathan Mapley.

collection · 
original (CUTwC)
tw-ref-ID · 
2287
Advertising Age (magazine)
location · 
USA
website · 
tw-pub-ID · 
535

Toggle showing 2 tiddlywinks references for Advertising Age.
published in · 
Advertising Age
date · 
10 September 1962
title · 
Rainier Beer’s Tiddlywinks Tourney Is Smashing Success
citation · 
page 30
summary

Oxford team playing in San Francisco

notes · 
http://tiddlywinks.org/bibliography/magazines-and-other-periodicals/advertising-age-10-september-1962/
keywords

1962 Oxford tour

collection · 
transcript (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2288
published in · 
Advertising Age
date · 
16 October 2009
title · 
Anheuser-Busch to Advertise in Super Bowl, Sun to Rise in the East
by · 
Brian Steinberg
content

When in the last decade or more of Super Bowl advertising has Anheuser not been in the game? The CBS ad-sales team could spend its time playing tiddly-winks and still sell ad time for Bud and Bud Light ads

tw-ref-ID · 
2289
AGPC Quarterly (magazine)
associated with · 
Association of Game & Puzzle Collectors
publication ID · 
ISSN 1529-4706
location · 
Brookesville, Maryland, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
607

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for AGPC Quarterly.
published in · 
AGPC Quarterly
date · 
Summer 2008
title · 
Tiddlywinks
subtitle · 
A Royal Match
by · 
Rick Tucker
citation · 
volume 10 • issue 2 • page 20 • column 1, 2
collection · 
original (NATwA)
notability rating · 
important
tw-ref-ID · 
2437
The Albany Review (magazine)
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
536

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for The Albany Review.
published in · 
The Albany Review
date · 
July 1907
title · 
The Cricket Fetish
by · 
Alfred Fellows
citation · 
volume 1 • issue 4 • page 431
content

Some of them no doubt enjoy the pleasures of anticipation or successful achievement; but these are pleasures which can be enjoyed in an arm-chair at any time and in respect of any game, ping-pong, tiddley-winks, and hop-scotch included.

tw-ref-ID · 
2290
All the Year Round—A Weekly Journal Conducted by Charles Dickens (magazine)
location · 
UK
tw-pub-ID · 
537

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for All the Year Round—A Weekly Journal Conducted by Charles Dickens.
published in · 
All the Year Round—A Weekly Journal Conducted by Charles Dickens
date · 
18 March 1876
title · 
Skating and Drinking
citation · 
volume 16 • issue 381 • page 15
content

In the fourth volume of Punch, published in 1843, is an amusing account of a visit to the so-called Glaciarium, in Baker-street, where the artificial ice was surrounded by an elaborate mise en scène of Alpine or Arctic—it is not very clear which—character; but perhaps the balance of evidence is in favour of the Alps, as the lake was approached from a species of Swiss châlet. Punch’s contributor, who signed himself “Tiddledy Winks,” was very funny at the expense of the forlorn institution, in which he found himself alone save for the presence of one of the “natives, who rushed from a gorge of brown paper and whitewash at the extremity of the lake, and performed several savage evolutions upon its surface.” In the uncongenial atmosphere of Baker-street, the artificial ice lake soon melted away into the limbo of dead-and-gone speculations

notability rating · 
not tiddlywinks game
tw-ref-ID · 
2291
The Alpha Xi Delta (magazine)
associated with · 
Alpha Xi Delta
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
334

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for The Alpha Xi Delta.
published in · 
The Alpha Xi Delta
date · 
March 1925
citation · 
volume 22 • issue 2 • page 297
content

[...] faith and a clear conscience we gave a game of tiddledywinks as a booby prize. Would you believe it, that one set has started a craze for tiddledywinks among the fraternity men here that actually rivals the cross-word mania.

notes · 
Originally noted that as original (Drix/NATwA) but that is unlikely.
links · 
Google Books – digitized image (free) (tw-ref-link-id 972)
tw-ref-ID · 
1427
American Annals of the Deaf (magazine)
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
538

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for American Annals of the Deaf.
published in · 
American Annals of the Deaf
date · 
February 1897
title · 
Paragraphs.—IV.
citation · 
volume 42 • issue 2 • page 114
content

Then again, the children are apt to think that the word “played” can be used with unvarying correctness. This may hold true in nine cases out of ten with regard to boxed games, but in out-door sports the verbs also differ. We play ball, we play marbles, but do we ever play rope? When the boys come in, fresh from some jolly romp and anxious to tell of it, yet wishing to speak correctly, you will find that a rapid glance will be given at the slate to see if the beloved sport is there, and if so, it will be with increased confidence that they begin their tale. Here are a few sentences for illustration:

  • We played tiddledy winks.
  • We played jack-straws.
  • I turned somersaults on the grass.
  • I played hop-scotch
  • The boys had a tug-of-war

[…]

tw-ref-ID · 
2292
The American Botanist (magazine)
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
539

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for The American Botanist.
published in · 
The American Botanist
date · 
May 1917
title · 
EDITORIAL
citation · 
volume 23 • issue 2 • page 70
content

It is a great pity that the general public which has to use the plant names does not refuse entirely to countenance this monkeying with nomenclature. If the name-tinkers must be employed, let them engage in a game of tiddledywinks or take up tatting as a pastime.

collection · 
transcript (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2293
The American Flint (magazine)
Official Magazine of the American Flint Glass Workers Union of North America
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
541

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for The American Flint.
published in · 
The American Flint
date · 
November 1917
title · 
Toronto, Ont.
by · 
A. Mooney
citation · 
volume 9 • issue 1 • page 45
content

A. Lucas, W. O’Neill and G. Labadie have started to work on the Tiddley Winks shop here.

notability rating · 
not tiddlywinks game
tw-ref-ID · 
2296
Journal of American Folk-Lore (journal)
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
540

Toggle showing 2 tiddlywinks references for Journal of American Folk-Lore.
published in · 
Journal of American Folk-Lore
date · 
July 1893 to September 1893
title · 
Exhibit of games in the Columbian Exposition”/”Case II. Balls, Quoits, Marbles”
by · 
Stewart Culin
citation · 
volume 6 • issue 22 • page 209 • column 1
content

The comparatively new game “Tiddledy winks” follows, leading up to a recent German game called the “Newest War Game,” in which the men or “winks” are played upon a board upon which are represented two opposing fortresses.

collection · 
photocopy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2294
published in · 
Journal of American Folk-Lore
date · 
January 1961 to March 1961
title · 
Sixty Years of Historic Change in the Game Preferences of American Children
by · 
Brian Sutton-Smith & B. G. Rosenberg
citation · 
page 19, 20, 29, 35, 26, 42, 43
summary

results of surveys in 1898, 1921, and 1959

collection · 
transcript (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2295
The American Magazine (magazine)
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
542

Toggle showing 3 tiddlywinks references for The American Magazine.
published in · 
The American Magazine
date · 
January 1891
title · 
London Music Halls
by · 
P. Anstey
citation · 
volume 82 • issue 488 • page 198
content

No, she won’t, old Tiddly winks!” says the boy, rising suddenly from his hiding – place. “In less than ten minutes you will be a corpse!”

notability rating · 
not tiddlywinks game
tw-ref-ID · 
2297
published in · 
The American Magazine
date · 
April 1918
title · 
The Making of George Groton – A Novel
by · 
Bruce Barton
citation · 
page 45-46
content

Page 45: “New York Wants to Talk to You” You ought to have seen us the other night, squatting on a million-dollar rug in his house, with ten thousand dollars’ worth of electric lights shining on us and fifty thousand dollars’ worth of servants peeking around the corner—down on the floor playing tiddledy-winks. Cross my heart. And it would have made you cry to see how the old guy enjoyed it.

Page 46:

2/3rd-page illustration of two well-dressed men kneeling on the floor, playing tiddlywinks.

You ought to have seen us the other night, squatting on a million-dollar rug in his house, with ten thousand dollars’ worth of electric lights shining on us and fifty thousand dollars’ worth of servants peeking around the corner—down on the floor playing tiddledy-winks.

collection · 
digitized copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2298
published in · 
The American Magazine
date · 
1938
citation · 
volume 125 • page 166
content

tiddlywinks game that you play until it’s time to go to work. And that’s just what it is to me! I don’t want to be a singer. I want to be a woman! If I’m a man, you made me one. Oh, yes, that’s the worst of it. It’s mostly tiddlywinks, but its’s partly building yourself up to the level of that […]

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2299
American Photography (magazine)
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
543

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for American Photography.
published in · 
American Photography
date · 
December 1917
citation · 
volume 11 • issue 12 • page 685
content
Page 684 (heading): Editorial Our Competitions Page 685: Commendation: […]”Tiddledy Winks”, Chas. D. Meservey
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2300
The American Spectator (magazine)
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
544

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for The American Spectator.
published in · 
The American Spectator
date · 
October 1993
title · 
Northern Exposure
citation · 
volume 26 • issue 10 • page 43 (6)
summary

Canadian post-Mulroney politics and the rise of Kim Campbell, the first woman Prime Minister

tw-ref-ID · 
2301
American Stationer (journal)
location · 
USA
Notes

Available at the Library of Congress

tw-pub-ID · 
545

Toggle showing 42 tiddlywinks references for American Stationer.
published in · 
American Stationer
date · 
18 September 1890
column title · 
Trade Novelties
title · 
A New Game
citation · 
volume 27 • page 691 • column full width
summary

re E. I. Horsman’s “Tiddledy Wink Tennis”. Illustrated

content

In “Tiddledy WInk Tennis” E. I. Horsman, 80 William street, has brought out a very pretty and lively parlor game, which will furnish sport for tennis players during the season when they are debarred from exercising their skill in the open air. "Tiddledy Winks," as originaly brought out, is full of amusement, but the new game is infinitely more engaging, and, besides, it offers a considerable field for the display of nice calculation and skill.

>The accompanying illustrationg, which is taken from the box cover, will give the reader a very good idea of how the game looks when laid out for playing. The court is a parallelogram of thick green felt, marked off with white lines in exact imitation of a regular tennis court. Each player is provided with a large bone counter termed a “racket.” A number of small bone disks represent tennis balls. Special rules are provided which differ little from regular tennis, and singles and doubles, as well as three handed games, may be played.

Persons who are unfamiliar with lawn tennis may become conversant with the rules by playing “Tiddled Wink Tennis,” and thus be able to master the game much more readily. The game is learned in a litle while, and will be found one of the most lively and amusing of the many offered for parlor sport. A cup and the full number of counteres for the regular game of “Tiddledy Winks” is provided with the new game. Dealers should send for descriptive circular at once.

Illustration of the box cover.
Tiddledy Wink Tennis.
collection · 
photocopy (NATwA); digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
important
tw-ref-ID · 
2302
published in · 
American Stationer
date · 
9 October 1890
column title · 
Trade Items
citation · 
volume 27 • page 850 • column 1, 2
summary

Interview with E. I. Horsman

content

E. I. Horsman, 80 William street, is wearing a 7x9 smile these days, notwithstanding he has set the whole world by the ears with his “Tiddledy Winks” tennis and dealers are fairly tumbling over each other in their haste to get orders in early. Mr. Horsman thinks that the “Tiddledy Winks” games have made the best hit of any he has ever brought out. At any rate, he has had to roll up his sleeves and help get out order. He cannot manufacture the games fast enough, however, to keep up, and has adopted the plan of sending a dozen to dealers who order a gross, and one single game to him who orders a dozen, and filling the hiatus with liberal promises. He is increasing his facilities for manufacutring, and hopes soon to be able to fill all order promptly.

collection · 
photocopy (NATwA); digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
important
tw-ref-ID · 
2303
published in · 
American Stationer
date · 
30 October 1890
column title · 
Trade Items
citation · 
volume 27 • page 1017 • column 1
summary

Interview with E. I. Horsman

content

E. I. Horsman, 80 William street, has been caught in a whirlwind of orders for his two favorite games, “Tiddledy Winks Tennis” and “Halma.” He has had to provide a separate book in which to index orders, so that they may be found in the order books without loss of time, a plan he has never before been compelled to adopt. One apartment of his establishment is given up to printed matter for gratuitous distribution concerning these two games. Games are in high favor with the trade this fall.

collection · 
photocopy (NATwA); digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
important
tw-ref-ID · 
2304
published in · 
American Stationer
date · 
20 November 1890
column title · 
Trade Items
citation · 
volume 27 • page 1185 • column 2
summary

Interview with E. I. Horsman

content

Acting on the hint thrown out in The Stationer of October 30, E. I. Horsman, 80 William street, is now engaged in preparing a progressive game of “Tiddledy Winks Tennis.” It promises to be novel and amusing, and it is soon to be ready for the trade. Look out for it!

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
important
tw-ref-ID · 
2306
published in · 
American Stationer
date · 
4 December 1890
column title · 
Chat by the way
citation · 
volume 27 • page 1307 • column 1
summary

Interview with E. I. Horsman

content

“See that bundle of letters?” said E. I. Horsman, the great “Tiddledy Winks Tennis” promoter, 80 William street. “Well, there are sixty-five of them, every one orders for my favorite game, and they have got to be answered before I go to my dinner, because the writers must have their orders filled before CHristmas, so they say, and we are so behind that I must personally beg them to excercise a little patience in the matter. ‘Tiddledy Winks Tennis’ is a great thing, I tell you, but I cannot stop to explain why just now. Come again—after the holidays, when the rush is over—and we will confer together on the subject.”

collection · 
photocopy (NATwA); digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
important
tw-ref-ID · 
2305
published in · 
American Stationer
date · 
18 December 1890
column title · 
Trade Items
citation · 
volume 27 • page 1412 • column 2
summary

Interview with E. I. Horsman

content

The dealers are still worrying the life out of E. I. Horsman, 80 William street, about “Tiddledy Winks Tennis,” although it must be said he preserves a wonderfully comfortable appearance and smiling countenance for a man who thinks of “Tiddledy Winks” all day and dreams about it all night. He declares, however, that he believes people will go right on buying the game regardless of the close of the holiday season, and he thinks there will be no rest for him until every man, woman and child in the United States has one, and he is afraid that by that time Europe will have heard of it, and he will have fresh troubles trying to understand what they want. However, he does not look as though he would mind a babel of tongues very much if “Tiddledy Winks” was involve.d

collection · 
photocopy (NATwA); digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
important
tw-ref-ID · 
2307
published in · 
American Stationer
date · 
1 January 1891
column title · 
Trade Items
citation · 
volume 29 • issue 1 • whole 810 • page 21 • column 1
summary

Interview with E. I. Horsman

content

E. I. Horsman, importer, manufacturer and dealer in toys and games, 80 William street, is preparing to do a big business this year in lawn tennis, and expects to put on the market the finest line ever brought out in this country. To this end he has enlarged his factory, doubled its capacity and substituted a 100 horse power engine for the 50 horse power hitherto used. Altogether he is getting ready to repeat his “Tiddledy Winks Tennis” triumphs, and the lawns and parks will bloom with pretty maids and gallant lads all singing the praises of Horsman’s tennis outfits, undoubtedly.

collection · 
photocopy, digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
important
tw-ref-ID · 
2308
published in · 
American Stationer
date · 
8 January 1891
column title · 
Correspondence
title · 
Denver
subtitle · 
[From our regular correspondent]
citation · 
volume 29 • issue 1 • whole 810 • page 56 • column 3
content

Denver, Col., January 1, 1891.

A visit to the stores of various kinds even at the present time reveals a plentiful supply of goods left over and anniversaries can be cared for while the new goods are being made. The only article entirely sold out was the great and only game of the season, “Tiddledy WInks.” Not even a “wink” could be had on Christmas Eve, and clerks would merely shake their heads at the inquiry, having “just sold the last one” for several hours. Now, the quest is what sells a game like that—the price or the craze?

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2309
published in · 
American Stationer
date · 
22 January 1891
column title · 
Correspondence
title · 
Kansas City
subtitle · 
[From our regular correspondent]
citation · 
volume 29 • issue 4 • whole 813 • page 156 • column 1
content

Kansas City, Mo., January 17, 1891

Of all the new games called for during the season “Tiddledy Winks” took the lead, and what was the worst feature nobody could supply the demand.

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2310
published in · 
American Stationer
date · 
22 January 1891
column title · 
Answers to Correspondence
citation · 
volume 29 • issue 4 • whole 813 • page 179 • column 2
content

H., Williamsport, Pa. wants to know where he can get, in quantities, the bone chips used in the game of “Tiddledy Winks”

Ans. We understand that they are imported. E. I. Horsman, 80 WIlliam street, New York, may be able to supply you. The Strobel & Wilken Company and Hinrichs & Co. import them. American manufacturers of bone goods, like C. J. Bates, Chester, Conn., or the Rogers & Hubbard Company, Middletown, Conn., may possibly meet your demand.

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2311
published in · 
American Stationer
date · 
29 January 1891
column title · 
Correspondence
title · 
Pittsburgh
subtitle · 
[From our regular correspondent]
citation · 
volume 29 • issue 5 • whole 814 • page 208 • column 3
content

Pittsburg, January 24, 1891.

The game of Tiddledy Winks has had a great run here and in some circles appeared as a formidable rival of euchre, and great numbers were sold during the holidays.

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2312
published in · 
American Stationer
date · 
29 January 1891
column title · 
Trade Items
citation · 
volume 29 • issue 5 • whole 814 • page 224 • column 2
summary

Interview with E. I. Horsman

content

E.I. Horsman, the toy man, 80 William street, says that “Tiddledy WInks Tennis” is still in such demand that he can hardly get time to attend to the business of bringing out the superb line of lawn tennis goods which he has promised the public it should have next summer. For a simple game “Tiddledy Winks Tennis” has had a remarkable run, and strange to say, the more the public have of it the better they like it.

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2313
published in · 
American Stationer
date · 
5 February 1891
citation · 
volume 29 • issue 6 • whole 815 • page 282 • column full width
summary

Includes illustration of a black pot kettle at left with ring handle, marked “TRADE MARK”, and hand with shooter on wink at right.

content

Tiddledy Winks.

SELCHOW & RIGHTER,

41 John Street, New York.
The illustration at left shows a black urn pot with three legs and a curved handle. The illustration at right shows a hand holding a squidger on a wink on a tablecloth.

Offer a new line of this popular game of their own make as follows:

No. 1, 10 cents retail, wood box with neat label, wood pot painted, with bale and feet (see cut), four large counters, twenty-four small of wood, nicely colored. The best 10 cent make on the market. Price, $9.00 per gross.

No. 2, 25 cents retail, large wood box with lithographed label, box partitioned for the different counter, handsome pot, painted and varnished, with bale and feet (see cut). The best 25 cent edition offered. Price, $24.00 per gross.

No. 3, 50 cents retail, ready February 10, elegant polished wood box, size 4½ x 9, with gilt label on cover, elegant gilt pot, box partitioned for different counters, counters of bone, six of large, thirty-six of small, good colors. Price, $48.00 per gross. The finest 50 cent style made. Samples mailed, post paid, on receipt of 10 cents for No. 1, 20 cents for No. 2, 40 cents for No. 3.

SPECIAL PRICES TO JOBBING TRADE

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
important
tw-ref-ID · 
2314
published in · 
American Stationer
date · 
12 February 1891
citation · 
volume 29 • issue 7 • whole 816 • page 320 • column full width
summary

Includes illustration of a black pot kettle at left with ring handle, marked “TRADE MARK”, and hand with shooter on wink at right.

content

Tiddledy Winks.

SELCHOW & RIGHTER,

41 John Street, New York.
The illustration at left shows a black urn pot with three legs and a curved handle. The illustration at right shows a hand holding a squidger on a wink on a tablecloth.

Offer a new line of this popular game of their own make as follows:

No. 1, 10 cents retail, wood box with neat label, wood pot painted, with bale and feet (see cut), four large counters, twenty-four small of wood, nicely colored. The best 10 cent make on the market. Price, $9.00 per gross.

No. 2, 25 cents retail, large wood box with lithographed label, box partitioned for the different counter, handsome pot, painted and varnished, with bale and feet (see cut). The best 25 cent edition offered. Price, $24.00 per gross.

No. 3, 50 cents retail, ready February 10, elegant polished wood box, size 4½ x 9, with gilt label on cover, elegant gilt pot, box partitioned for different counters, counters of bone, six of large, thirty-six of small, good colors. Price, $48.00 per gross. The finest 50 cent style made. Samples mailed, post paid, on receipt of 10 cents for No. 1, 20 cents for No. 2, 40 cents for No. 3.

SPECIAL PRICES TO JOBBING TRADE

notes · 
Same advertisement as in American Stationer, 5 February 1891, page 282.
collection · 
photocopy, digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
important
tw-ref-ID · 
2315
published in · 
American Stationer
date · 
12 February 1891
title · 
Tiddledy Winks.
citation · 
volume 29 • issue 7 • whole 816 • page 334 • column 2
content

The evidently fascinating game of “Tiddledy Winks” is again on its travels, this time under the aegis of Selchow & Righter, 41 John street, who are putting two styles on the market, which for convenience and finish equal, if they do not excel, those offered by any other house. The larger box is square, neatly put together, and has a sliding cover which is illuminated with a

Illustration of a dark pot with legs and a ringed handle
Wink Pot
bright and handsome design. The box inside is divided into compartments intended to contain the game in an orderly and convenient manner, the “winks,” which are in four colors, having a compartment for each color, while in the centre is a round well into which the “wink pot” fits snugly, with the “tiddledies” stacked within it. The “tiddledies” and “winks” are made of polished bone, nicely colored blue, red, yellow and green, six “winks” to each color, and one “tiddledy” matching each set. The “wink pot” is a very clever imitation of a kitchen pot for cooking purposes.The second style is smaller, put up in an oblong box divided into compartments, and

Illustration of a hand holding a shooter against a wink.
Position in Playing “Tiddledy Winks.”

Accompanying this article are illustrations of the “wink” pot and the maner of playing. The pot being set in the middle of the table, the player places his “winks” before him in a row, then laying the “tiddledy” upon the centre of the “wink,” as shown in the cut, draws it backward with a firm pressure; as it slips from the wink, the disk will jump up and forward, the distance being regulated by the pressure. The object is, of course, to jump all the “winks” into the pot, the one who does this first winning the game.This little amusement is the very climax of simplicity, yet it seems to have hit popular favor and is enjoying a run which has hardly been duplicated in the world of games. The uncommonly nice form in which it is offered by Selchow & Righter will give it a new accession of popularity throughout the country without doubt.

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
important
tw-ref-ID · 
2316
published in · 
American Stationer
date · 
19 February 1891
column title · 
Trade Items
citation · 
volume 29 • issue 8 • whole 817 • page 391 • column 1
content

The New York News Company is having a very brisk call for what is known as “The Children's Delight.” It is a package of assorted gold, silver, glazed and enameled papers, which are used by the little folks for a great variet of purposes. The packages are neatly put up and have made a veritable hit. This house has also a miniature windmill which is known as the “Signal Service Weather Vane and Windmill.” It has also a full supply of “Tiddledy Winks” and can fill all orders promptly.

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2317
published in · 
American Stationer
date · 
19 February 1891
title · 
PROGRESSIVE TIDDLEDY WINKS.
citation · 
volume 29 • issue 8 • whole 817 • page 400 • column full width
content

We have just completed a new and very elegant set for playing at this popular amusement progressively. The set contains full directions, lithographed score cards, invitation cards, a signal bell, and finest quality bone chips sufficient for sixteen players.

The whole forms one of the handsomest and most complete packages we have offered.

Retail Price, $3.00, subject to the usual Discount.

We have also a full line of 25 cent, 50 cent, and $1.00 TIDDLEDY WINKS, in all of which we use only BONE CHIPS.

McLOUGHLIN BROS.,

No. 623 Broadway, New York.

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
important
tw-ref-ID · 
2318
published in · 
American Stationer
date · 
19 February 1891
citation · 
volume 29 • issue 8 • whole 817 • page 411 • column 1, 2, 3
content

Tiddledy Winks.

SELCHOW & RIGHTER,

41 John Street, New York.
The illustration at left shows a black urn pot with three legs and a curved handle. The illustration at right shows a hand holding a squidger on a wink on a tablecloth.

Offer a new line of this popular game of their own make as follows:

No. 1, 10 cents retail, wood box with neat label, wood pot painted, with bale and feet (see cut), four large counters, twenty-four small of wood, nicely colored. The best 10 cent make on the market. Price, $9.00 per gross.

No. 2, 25 cents retail, large wood box with lithographed label, box partitioned for the different counter, handsome pot, painted and varnished, with bale and feet (see cut). The best 25 cent edition offered. Price, $24.00 per gross.

No. 3, 50 cents retail, ready February 10, elegant polished wood box, size 4½ x 9, with gilt label on cover, elegant gilt pot, box partitioned for different counters, counters of bone, six of large, thirty-six of small, good colors. Price, $48.00 per gross. The finest 50 cent style made. Samples mailed, post paid, on receipt of 10 cents for No. 1, 20 cents for No. 2, 40 cents for No. 3.

SPECIAL PRICES TO JOBBING TRADE

notes · 
Same advertisement as in American Stationer, 5 February 1891, page 282.
collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
important
tw-ref-ID · 
2319
published in · 
American Stationer
date · 
19 February 1891
column title · 
Trade Items
citation · 
volume 29 • issue 8 • whole 817 • page 389 • column 2
content

McLoughlin Brothers, 623 Broadway, have recently put on the market an elegant layout for a progressive game of “Tiddledy Winks.” The set is contained in a handsome box strongly made and covered with wine colored moire paper stamped with gold, and comprises uncommonly beautiful score cards, steel plate invitation cards, a pretty nickel signal bell, bone chips of the finest quality sufficient for sixteen players, and four “wink pots” of polished box wood. This is one of the handsomest and most complete games ever brought out by this house, which is noted for the originality and finish of its goods. The firm also carries a full line of regular “Tiddledy Winks” of different grades, but all with real bone chips. In connection with the above it may be said that this house has practically completed its lines of new books, blocks and games, and from the samples shown to a representative of The Stationer it is safe to say that McLoughlin Brothers have surpassed themselves in all of the features for which their goods are famous.

collection · 
photocopy, digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
important
tw-ref-ID · 
2323
published in · 
American Stationer
date · 
26 February 1891
column title · 
Correspondence
subtitle · 
Duluth, Minn., February 19, 1891
citation · 
volume 29 • issue 9 • whole 818 • page 462 • column 1
content

Albertston & Chamberlain occupy a prominent locality upon the main street, the front of their building presenting a very attractive appearance, having one very large plate glass show window. The sign above blew down, some ten days ago, breaking through the glass, which break is at present covered by a sheet, with this very appropriate and interesting notice: “The sign did not break the glass, but the extraordinary low prices inside on Tiddledy Winks and other goods were the cause,” and no doubt it was so.

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2320
published in · 
American Stationer
date · 
26 February 1891
citation · 
volume 29 • issue 9 • whole 818 • page 469 • column full width
content

Tiddledy Winks.

SELCHOW & RIGHTER,

41 John Street, New York.
The illustration at left shows a black urn pot with three legs and a curved handle. The illustration at right shows a hand holding a squidger on a wink on a tablecloth.

Offer a new line of this popular game of their own make as follows:

No. 1, 10 cents retail, wood box with neat label, wood pot painted, with bale and feet (see cut), four large counters, twenty-four small of wood, nicely colored. The best 10 cent make on the market. Price, $9.00 per gross.

No. 2, 25 cents retail, large wood box with lithographed label, box partitioned for the different counter, handsome pot, painted and varnished, with bale and feet (see cut). The best 25 cent edition offered. Price, $24.00 per gross.

No. 3, 50 cents retail, ready February 10, elegant polished wood box, size 4½ x 9, with gilt label on cover, elegant gilt pot, box partitioned for different counters, counters of bone, six of large, thirty-six of small, good colors. Price, $48.00 per gross. The finest 50 cent style made. Samples mailed, post paid, on receipt of 10 cents for No. 1, 20 cents for No. 2, 40 cents for No. 3.

SPECIAL PRICES TO JOBBING TRADE

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
important
tw-ref-ID · 
2321
published in · 
American Stationer
date · 
26 February 1891
column title · 
Trade Novelties
title · 
RING-A-PEG.
citation · 
volume 29 • issue 9 • whole 818 • page 473 • column 2, 3
summary

“Ring-A-Peg”, invented by John J. B. Trainer, manufactured by Geo. B. Leiter & Co. (and also by E. I. Horsman).

content

This is the name of a new game which is about to be placed upon the market. In point of interest and general attractiveness it promises to outrival the famous “Tiddledy Winks.” It combines instruction with amusement, as will be seen by the following description and manner of player: A circular board containing a number of upright pegs is placed on a cloth in the centre of the table. The game may be played by two, three or four persons, each player being provided with five rings made of bone brightly colored and a square piece of the same material called the “ringer,” the latter being used to snap the rings upon the upright pegs.

The centre of king peg is higher than the rest and being the more difficult to ring counts the player relatively more than the pegs on the circles, the numbers of which will be designated in the direction. “Ring-a-Peg” can be played in several different ways, which will prove a decided advantage over games of a similar character.

The inventor of the game is John H. B. Trainer, a young man who has been connected with the book, stationery, and fancy goods trade ever since he was a small boy.

The manufacturers are Geo. B. Leiter & Co., Williamsport, Pa.

Illustration of the Ring-A-Peg game target.
RING-A-PEG.
collection · 
photocopy, digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
important
tw-ref-ID · 
2322
published in · 
American Stationer
date · 
26 February 1891
column title · 
Trade Items
citation · 
volume 29 • issue 9 • whole 818 • page 476 • column 3
content
Selchow & Righter, 41 John street, report good business with their “Tiddledy Winks” games.
collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2324
published in · 
American Stationer
date · 
26 February 1891
citation · 
volume 29 • issue 9 • whole 818 • page 499 • column full width
content

We have just completed a new and very elegant set for playing at this popular amusement progressively. The set contains full directions, lithographed score cards, invitation cards, a signal bell, and finest quality bone chips sufficient for sixteen players.

The whole forms one of the handsomest and most complete packages we have offered.

Retail Price, $3.00, subject to the usual Discount.

We have also a full line of 25 cent, 50 cent, and $1.00 TIDDLEDY WINKS, in all of which we use only BONE CHIPS.

McLOUGHLIN BROS.,

No. 623 Broadway, New York.

notes · 
Same McLoughlin Bros. advertisement as in the 19 February 1891 American Stationer.
collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
important
tw-ref-ID · 
2325
published in · 
American Stationer
date · 
5 March 1891
citation · 
volume 29 • issue 10 • whole 819 • page 549 • column left half
content

TIDDLEDY WINKS

Illustration of a black pot kettle at left with a ring handle, marked “TRADE MARK”, and a hand with a squidger on a wink at right

SELCHOW & RIGHTER

OFFER THE BEST LINE OF THIS POPULAR GAME MADE IN THREE STYLES, TO RETAIL AT

10 cts., 25 ct. and 50 cts. per Set.

Send for Descriptive List with Wholesale Prices.

“PARCHEESI” and a Parcheesi board are illustrated on the right half of the page.

SELCHOW & RIGHTER, Publishers, 41 John St., New York

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2326
published in · 
American Stationer
date · 
12 March 1891
citation · 
volume 29 • issue 11 • whole 820 • page 563 • column left half
content

TIDDLEDY WINKS

Illustration of a black pot kettle at left with a ring handle, marked “TRADE MARK”, and a hand with a squidger on a wink at right

SELCHOW & RIGHTER

OFFER THE BEST LINE OF THIS POPULAR GAME MADE IN THREE STYLES, TO RETAIL AT

10 cts., 25 ct. and 50 cts. per Set.

Send for Descriptive List with Wholesale Prices.

“PARCHEESI” and a Parcheesi board are illustrated on the right half of the page.

SELCHOW & RIGHTER, Publishers, 41 John St., New York

notes · 
Same Selchow & Righter advertisement as in the 5 March 1891 issue of American Stationer.
collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2327
published in · 
American Stationer
date · 
19 March 1891
citation · 
page 638 • column left half
content

TIDDLEDY WINKS

Illustration of a black pot kettle at left with a ring handle, marked “TRADE MARK”, and a hand with a squidger on a wink at right

SELCHOW & RIGHTER

OFFER THE BEST LINE OF THIS POPULAR GAME MADE IN THREE STYLES, TO RETAIL AT

10 cts., 25 ct. and 50 cts. per Set.

Send for Descriptive List with Wholesale Prices.

“PARCHEESI” and a Parcheesi board are illustrated on the right half of the page.

SELCHOW & RIGHTER, Publishers, 41 John St., New York

notes · 
Same Selchow & Righter advertisement as in the 5 March 1891 issue of American Stationer.
collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2328
published in · 
American Stationer
date · 
2 April 1891
title · 
“Crickets on the Hearth.”
citation · 
page 730, 731 • column 3 (page 730), 1 (page 731)
content

Selchow & Righter are in the field with a new game. It is illustrated on this page and is known as “Crickets on the

Illustration of wooden game board with a vertical hearth apparatus.
"CRICKETS ON THE HEARTH."

The game is somewhat similar to “Tiddledy Winks.” The board on which the game is played consists of a floor divided into spaces and a fireplace with mantel and a hole in the wall over the mantel. In playing a small chip, called a “cricket,” is placed on a felt disk located in the square farthest from the fireplace and is then snapped with a large chip. If the cricket goes through the hole it counts the player 100, if it remains on the mantel it counts seventy-five, while if it lands in the squares directly in front of the fireplace it scores ten or twenty points according as it is the left or right hand square. The implements of the game are the shelf, by which name the board is known, ten crickets and one large chip for snapping. The game is very interesting and possesses capabilities which will no doubt be freely developed by the children of this country. The shelf folds up, inclosing within it the “crickets” and the large chip. The firm will be pleased to give the rade all information which may be desired in regard to this new and attractive game.

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
important
tw-ref-ID · 
2329
published in · 
American Stationer
date · 
9 April 1891
title · 
CRICKET ON THE HEARTH
citation · 
page 781 • column 2, 3
content

JUST READY

An Improvement on the Popular Game of Tiddledy Winks.

Snap the Counters same as Tiddledy Winks; if they go through the opening the count is 100; on the shelf, 75; in the space below, 10, 20 or nothing, as may be.

ATTRACTIVE. GOOD. CHEAP.

Retail at 10c. Price, $9.00 per Gross.

Samples mailed, postpaid, on receipt of 10 cents.

SELCHOW & RIGHTER,
MAKERS,
41 JOHN STREET, NEW YORK.

Illustration at right of the wooden game board and vertical hearth target.
collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
important
tw-ref-ID · 
2330
published in · 
American Stationer
date · 
16 April 1891
citation · 
page 845 • column 2, 3
content

JUST READY

An Improvement on the Popular Game of Tiddledy Winks.

Snap the Counters same as Tiddledy Winks; if they go through the opening the count is 100; on the shelf, 75; in the space below, 10, 20 or nothing, as may be.

ATTRACTIVE. GOOD. CHEAP.

Retail at 10c. Price, $9.00 per Gross.

Samples mailed, postpaid, on receipt of 10 cents.

SELCHOW & RIGHTER,
MAKERS,
41 JOHN STREET, NEW YORK.

Illustration at right of the wooden game board and vertical hearth target.
notes · 
Same Selchow & Righter advertisement as in the 9 April 1891 issue of American Stationer.
collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
important
tw-ref-ID · 
2331
published in · 
American Stationer
date · 
7 May 1891
column title · 
Trade Items
citation · 
page 970, 971 • column 3 (page 970), 1 (page 971)
content

Selchow & Righter are now in their new quarters at 390 Broadway, where they will be glad to see all their friends in the trade.

The new store is very deep, is nicely arranged and presents an air of prosperity and activity which is very pleasing. Then there is a cellar and sub-cellar, both of which are crowded with toys, games, &c. This firm has just issued its spring catalogue, which contains eighty pages devoted to descriptions and illustrations of equipments for croquet, lawn tennis, baseball, football and in fact all indoor and outdoor sports; hammocks, fishing outfits, air guns, fire cracker cannon, small steam engines, tiddledy winks, parcheesi, planchette and a thousand and one other games. The catalogue will be sent to anyone who is sufficiently interested to make a request for it.

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2333
published in · 
American Stationer
date · 
23 May 1891
column title · 
Trade Items
citation · 
page 857 • column 2, 3
content

JUST READY

An Improvement on the Popular Game of Tiddledy Winks.

Snap the Counters same as Tiddledy Winks; if they go through the opening the count is 100; on the shelf, 75; in the space below, 10, 20 or nothing, as may be.

ATTRACTIVE. GOOD. CHEAP.

Retail at 10c. Price, $9.00 per Gross.

Samples mailed, postpaid, on receipt of 10 cents.

SELCHOW & RIGHTER,
MAKERS,
41 JOHN STREET, NEW YORK.

Illustration at right of the wooden game board and vertical hearth target.
notes · 
Same Selchow & Righter advertisement as in the 9 April 1891 issue of American Stationer.
collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
important
tw-ref-ID · 
2332
published in · 
American Stationer
date · 
13 August 1891
column title · 
Communications
title · 
Travelers' Expense Accounts.
subtitle · 
Dayton, Ohio, August 5, 1891.
citation · 
volume 30 • page 324 • column 2
content

As “P.D.Q.” says, houses should not send men out whom they cannot trust to use moderation in all things except getting business. I attended the convention of the U. C. T. held in this place recently, and on the last page of the banquet menu were the toasts, followed by what was supposed to be a list of the average traveler's expenses. It was as follows:

  • Hotel… $5.00
  • Seeing frield… 2.50
  • Railroad ticket… 1.00
  • Bus… 6.00
  • Hair cut… .15
  • Gave a blind man… 4.00
  • Porter… 25c.
  • More porter… 3.75
  • On account of a weak hand… 8.00
  • Prescription… Quinine… .20
  • Whiskey… 3.00
  • Tiddledy Winks&hellips; 7.00
  • Stamps… 2.75

Now, the average firm might in justice kick on the item, “weak hand;” but the “prescription” and “tiddledy winks” ought to “go.” The “bus” item, too, is quite reasonable, especially if it were incurred in Pittsburg.

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2335
published in · 
American Stationer
date · 
27 August 1891
citation · 
volume 30 • page 417 • column full width
summary

Selchow & Righter advertisement for “Snap Dragon”, “Pedro”, “Juno”, and two varieties of “Cricket on the Hearth”. Illustrated.

content
Illustration of the horizontal base and vertical targets of the Snap Dragon game.
SNAP DRAGON.
Illustration of the horizontal base and vertical targets of the Pedro game.
PEDRO.
Illustration of the horizontal base and vertical targets of the Juno game.
JUNO.
Illustration of the horizontal base and vertical targets of the Cricket on the Hearth game.
CRICKET ON THE HEARTH.
Five Editions.
Four of the latest and best Home Games on the market. Each in polished box, which closes up when not in use. Each game is an improved Tiddledy Winks, the principle of playing being similar. Bo better 25c. games can be offered. Just ready. Each, price, $2.00 per dozen. Samples of either mailed post paid, on receipt of 25c.

CRICKET ON . .
. . THE HEARTH

AN IMPROVEMENT ON THE POPULAR GAME OF TIDDLEDY WINKS.

Snap the counters same as Tiddledy WInks; if they go through the opening the count is 100; on the shelf, 75; in the space below, 10, 20, or nothing, as may be.

GOOD. CHEAP. ATTRACTIVE.

Retail at 10c. Price, $9.00 per Gross.

Samples mailed, post paid, on receipt of 10c.

Illustration of the horizontal base and vertical targets of this game.

ALL OF THESE GAMES ARE MANUFACTURED BY

SELCHOW & RIGHTER.

390 BROADWAY, Formerly at 41 John St., NEW YORK

PUBLISHERS OF AND WHOLESALE DEALERS IN

Games and Home Amusements.

THE FINEST VARIETY TO BE FOUND ANYWHERE.

collection · 
photocopy, digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
important
tw-ref-ID · 
2334
published in · 
American Stationer
date · 
27 August 1891
title · 
New Toys and Games.
citation · 
volume 30 • page 503 • column full width
summary

Article describing Selchow & Righter’s “Pedro”, “Juno”, “Snap Dragon”, and “Cricket on the Hearth”. Illustrated.

content

Selchow & Righter are in the field with a host of new goods for fall trade, all of which are on exhibition at their salesrooms, 290 Broadway, and some of which are illustrated in this number of The Stationer. In the way of games there are four which are variations of the “Cricket on the Hearth” which was brought out some time ago by this house. In “Pedro” there is a clown’s face with wide open mouth into which one snaps small brass rings. On the clown's nose and cheeks there are hooks, and rings which are caught thereon count the player a certain number of points. Then there is “Cricket,” wherein a very good representation of a fireplace is arranged, with swinging pot, mantel and an upper mantel holding two pots. Brass rings are used and snapped, as are the chips in “Cricket on the Hearth,” and the score is increased as the rings drop into the pots or rest on the shelves.

In “Juno” there is a small spring board by which the rings are thrown and the field on which they land has cups and pins of varying value. The fourth game, which is not illustrated here, is known as “Snap Dragon,” and is played with rings which are thrown at hooks which have various values.

Illustrations of three games, from left to right: Pedro, Juno, and Cricket, with corresponding captions.
collection · 
photocopy, digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
important
tw-ref-ID · 
2336
published in · 
American Stationer
date · 
22 October 1891
column title · 
Trade Novelties
title · 
"LO LO."
citation · 
volume 30 • page 871 • column 1
summary

“Lo Lo The New Parlor Croquet Game”, by L. E. Lawrence, introduced by E. I. Horsman. Illustrated.

content

A new parlour croquet game, known as “Lo Lo,” is being introduced by E. I. Horsman, New York. This is the latest and is believed to be the best thing in the way of a “Tiddledy Winks” game yet brought out.

Illustration of the "Lo Lo" game cover.
“LO LO,” OR NEW PARLOR CROQUET

The cut illustrates the cover of the box containing the game and shows the method of playing.

The implements of the game consist of a piece of green felt, 11 by 23 inches, with a border stamped in black. On this felt there is a regular croquet lay out of wire arches and stakes. Six colored bone disks and six "mallet disks" complete the outfit. The colored disks represent the balls and the "mallet disks" are used to snap them into positions or through the arches.

collection · 
photocopy, digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
important
tw-ref-ID · 
2337
published in · 
American Stationer
date · 
22 October 1891
title · 
Parker's Games
citation · 
volume 30 • page 898 • column 1, 3
content

The Salem game publishers are said to make the largest line of “Tiddledy WInks” issued, not only from wood, bone and composition, but also from genuine celluloid and vegetable ivory.

“Hop Scotch Tiddledy WInks,” one of the most popular elaborations of that game, is an article of especially large sale.

Illustration of the cover of “HOP SCOTCH (TRADE MARK) Tiddledy Winks”
“HOP SCOTCH TIDDLEDY WINKS.”
collection · 
photocopy, digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
important
tw-ref-ID · 
2338
published in · 
American Stationer
date · 
19 November 1891
column title · 
Trade Novelties
title · 
NEW PATENTS.
citation · 
volume 30 • page 1063 • column 3
summary

Patent listing of George Scott’s US patent

content

No. 432,170. Game.—George Scott, Birkenhead, County of Chester, England.

A game apparatus comprising a course having an elastic surface and provided at intervals with obstacles, such as counters and springers.

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2339
published in · 
American Stationer
date · 
9 November 1893
title · 
Games and Toys.
citation · 
volume 34 • page 963 • column 1
summary

"Sweet Wedding Bells", introduced by Selchow & Righter, jobbers.

content

This is the time of the year when the trade all over the country are interested in toys and games, and when stocks of these goods are laid in for the holidays. Selchow & Righter devote all of their energies to catering to this class of trade and this year they present an unusually fine line for consideration. […]

Illustration of the box cover of “SWEET WEDDING BELLS”.
“SWEET WEDDING BELLS”.

“Sweet Wedding Bells” is an entirely new game, introducing in its use the always popular feature of shooting small ivory or bone counters, used in the well-known game of “tiddledy winks.” The implements used in playing the game are in the first place necessary to build up a tower or church front, representing an old ivy cut of a church. This tower is put together in a very easy and simple manner, which is a feature of the game. Suspended in the tower is a brightly polished bell, which hangs directly in the centre of the tower, between the four windows. The counters are to be snapped through these windows of the tower, striking the bell and ringing it. Every time the bell is rung the fortunate player scores one point. It is put up in a large box, attractive in appearance, and must prove to be a very popular toy. The box is 7½ inches square and 1¼ inches deep.

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
important
tw-ref-ID · 
2340
published in · 
American Stationer
date · 
23 August 1902
title · 
Selchow & Righter
subtitle · 
Some of the New Goods That This Firm Is Showing—All Meeting with Approval
citation · 
volume 52 • issue 8 • page 4 • column 2, 3
summary

Descriptions of "Table Golf" (with illustration), "Tiddledy Winks Pool" (with illustration) and Tiddledy Winks Ring Game"

content

Table Golf is another new game offered to the trade by the same house [transcriber note: Selchow & Righter]

TIDDLEDY WINKS POOL.

that has caught the popular fancy owing to the prevalence of the golf craze. "To try it is to buy it" tells the story in regard to this thoroughly up-to-date game of golf that can be played on the parlor table. Links provided with bunkers, water hazard, tee and the regulation nine holes. All the elements of the regular outdoor golf Links are laid out on a felt 22x15 inches to which are fastened nine wooden cups (holes) while three places are marked thereon for the bunkers, and a pond of water is outlines. The implements consist of four bone chips (balls) and a piece of wood called the "Baffy." The game is played as "Tiddledy Winks," using the "Baffy" to propel the chips (balls) as per rules on cover of the box. All packed in neat box, 18½x10 inches, with attractive label on cover.

"Tiddledy Winks Pool" is a very attractive game of "Tiddledy Winks," being sold by Selchow & Righther. It consists of a box with handsome lithograph on cover, on the bottom of which is lithographed at>/p>
TIDDLEDY WINKS RING GAME.

one end a pool pyramid with depressions numbered from 1 to 15, and at the other end is a felt disk from which the shooting is done. The implements are two Tiddledys and six Winks, and the object of the game is to make the highest score shooting from the spot (felt). Full instructions with each game.

Another attractive game of "Tiddledy Winks," known as "Tiddledy Winks Ring Game," is similar to above except that at one end of the bottom of the box is a circle in which are set fourteen pins, each inside a smaller circle and numbered from 1 to 14. The felt disk is the same. The implements are two Tiddledys and four

TABLE GOLF.

Ring WInks. The game is played on the order of quoits, the object being to ring the pins counting the highest numbers.

tw-ref-ID · 
3788
published in · 
American Stationer
date · 
17 August 1907
title · 
PARKER BROTHERS
citation · 
volume 62 • page 57 • column full width
content

PARKER BROTHERS

(INCORPORATED)

NEW Offices
12th Floor, Flatiron Building
New York

Branch
London, England

Factory
Salem, Massachusetts

NEW GAMES & BRIDGE GOODS

Illustration of 5 adults around a table, playting the game POP-IN-TAW

POP-IN-TAW

GREAT NEW NOVELTY FOR THIS WINTER

A Fun Making Game for Any Number and All Ages

Pop-in-Taw is a rollicking game of the class which only makes its appearance at intervals of a few years. It is a “society[”] game in the same general class as Pillow Dex, Tiddledy Winks and Ping-Pong.

[…]

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2342
published in · 
American Stationer
date · 
31 August 1907
title · 
Parker Games
citation · 
volume 62 • page 28 • column 1
content

“Pop-in-Taw” is the very latest Parker game. It is a rollicking game of the class which only makes its appearance at intervals of a few years. It is a society game in the same general class as “Pillow Dex,” “Tiddledy Winks” and “Ping-Pong.”

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2341
The Annual American Catalogue (catalog)
publisher · 
Office of the Publishers' Weekly (R. R. Bowker)
location · 
New York, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
546

Toggle showing 2 tiddlywinks references for The Annual American Catalogue.
published in · 
The Annual American Catalogue
date · 
1892
title · 
Index to Books of 1891
subtitle · 
By Author, Title and Subject
citation · 
page 6 • column 1
content

Tiddledywink tales. (Ds) D. $1.25.
De Witt Pub. Ho

notability rating · 
minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2343
published in · 
The Annual American Catalogue
date · 
1892
title · 
1891
subtitle · 
Of Books recorded January 1 to December 31, 1891, will full titles and descrip[tive] notes, arranged alphabetically by Authors.
citation · 
page 13 • column 2
content

Bangs, J: Kendrick. Tiddledywink tales by C: Howard Johnson. N. Y. [De Witt Publishing House,] 1891. c. 5-236 p. il. D. cl., $1.25.

Jimmieboy was a little lad of four years, who had just been presented with a set of Tiddledy winks. After playing with his gift all day, Jimmieboy went to bed and was immediately transported to the realm of the Tiddledywinks. The strange and amusing sights that the young hero saw did not prevent a constant interchange of thought between himself and the small pieces of celluloid that comprise the game.

tw-ref-ID · 
2344
Annual Catalogue (catalog)
publisher · 
McLoughlin Brothers
location · 
New York, New York, USA
Notes

Title may vary.

tw-pub-ID · 
796

Toggle showing 13 tiddlywinks references for Annual Catalogue.
published in · 
Annual Catalogue
date · 
1895 (unmarked)
title · 
Annual Catalogue
by · 
McLoughlin Bros.
citation · 
page 70
content

No. 490.—KING'S QUOITS

Illustration of game box cover. The cover shows four royal persons at an angle in each corner.

Size, 15 x 17 inches

This game is a parlour quoit game played with light brass rings and a target-board filled with pegs for catching them.

There is also a tiddledy-winks game to be played upon the same target-board with perforated bone discs instead of chips, which is of merit equal to the regular quoits.

The game is very bright and attractive, as well as very simple to play. It is adapted to the use of children or young people.

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
interesting
type · 
catalog
tw-ref-ID · 
2901
published in · 
Annual Catalogue
date · 
1895 (unmarked)
title · 
Annual Catalogue
by · 
McLoughlin Bros.
citation · 
page 110
content

No. 850. TIDDLEDY WINKS — No. 0, 25 Cents.

No illustration

Duranoid Winks.
Box 3 x 4½ inches.

This game is similar to No. 1 wood pot, except that it has "Winks" and "Tiddledies" of duranoid instead of bone. This is neatly put up and a good Tiddledy Winks game, but is not quite so pleasant to play as a set with the bone winks.

No. 851. — TIDDLEDY WINKS — No. 1, 30 Cents.

No illustration

Size, 3 x 4½ inches, wood pots.
" 4½x 4½ " glass pots.

The game is played the same as that described under Tiddledy Winks, No. 2, above. These sets have not mats, but are intended to be used on a soft table cover. One to four may play.

We regard the wood pot as preferable to the glass for children, as it is much safer. The glass pot gives an attractive resonant sound as the chips fall into it, which induces some to prefer it.

No. 852.—TIDDLEDY WINKS — No. 2.
50 Cents.

Illustration of game with woman's hand at right shooting winks off soft pad towards pot at left. Game is marked "PATENT NOV. 18, 1890"

4½ x 8 inches.

The game of Tiddledy Winks is played with six round bone chips, or "Winks," ⅝ of an inch in diameter, one large chip, 1⅛ inches in diameter, a soft mat or table cover for each player, and a cup or "pot" for common use.

To play, a small chip is put on the mat; the large chip, grasped between the forefinger and thumb, is pressed upon its centre and drawn steadily away from the "pot." When the edge of the small chip, or Wink, is reached, it flies forward and upward toward the pot. The game is to put the Winks in the "pot" in this manner, as in the picture above. No. 2 has six sets of men, three mats, one for each pair of partners, and a wooden cup, or Wink pot.

The label is printed in colors.

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
interesting
type · 
catalog
tw-ref-ID · 
2902
published in · 
Annual Catalogue
date · 
1897 Season
title · 
Annual Catalogue
by · 
McLoughlin Bros.
citation · 
page 89
content

No. 490.—KING'S QUOITS

Illustration of game box cover. The cover shows four royal persons at an angle in each corner.

Size, 15 x 17 inches

This game is a parlour quoit game played with light brass rings and a target-board filled with pegs for catching them.

There is also a tiddledy-winks game to be played upon the same target-board with perforated bone discs instead of chips, which is of merit equal to the regular quoits.

The game is very bright and attractive, as well as very simple to play. It is adapted to the use of children or young people.

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
interesting
type · 
catalog
tw-ref-ID · 
2903
published in · 
Annual Catalogue
date · 
1897 Season
title · 
Annual Catalogue
by · 
McLoughlin Bros.
citation · 
page 123
content

No. 850. TIDDLEDY WINKS — No. 0, 25 Cents.

No illustration

Duranoid Winks.
Box 3 x 4½ inches.

This game is similar to No. 1 wood pot, except that it has "Winks" and "Tiddledies" of duranoid instead of bone. This is neatly put up and a good Tiddledy Winks game, but is not quite so pleasant to play as a set with the bone winks.

No. 851. — TIDDLEDY WINKS — No. 1, 30 Cents.

No illustration

Size, 3 x 4½ inches, wood pots.
" 4½x 4½ " glass pots.

The game is played the same as that described under Tiddledy Winks, No. 2, above. These sets have not mats, but are intended to be used on a soft table cover. One to four may play.

We regard the wood pot as preferable to the glass for children, as it is much safer. The glass pot gives an attractive resonant sound as the chips fall into it, which induces some to prefer it.

No. 852.—TIDDLEDY WINKS — No. 2.
50 Cents.

Illustration of game with woman's hand at right shooting winks off soft pad towards pot at left. Game is marked "PATENT NOV. 18, 1890"

4½ x 8 inches.

The game of Tiddledy Winks is played with six round bone chips, or "Winks," ⅝ of an inch in diameter, one large chip, 1⅛ inches in diameter, a soft mat or table cover for each player, and a cup or "pot" for common use.

To play, a small chip is put on the mat; the large chip, grasped between the forefinger and thumb, is pressed upon its centre and drawn steadily away from the "pot." When the edge of the small chip, or Wink, is reached, it flies forward and upward toward the pot. The game is to put the Winks in the "pot" in this manner, as in the picture above. No. 2 has six sets of men, three mats, one for each pair of partners, and a wooden cup, or Wink pot.

The label is printed in colors.

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
interesting
type · 
catalog
tw-ref-ID · 
2904
published in · 
Annual Catalogue
date · 
1898 Season
title · 
Annual Catalogue
by · 
McLoughlin Bros.
citation · 
page 98
content

No. 490.—KING'S QUOITS

Illustration of game box cover. The cover shows four royal persons at an angle in each corner.

Size, 15 x 17 inches

This game is a parlour quoit game played with light brass rings and a target-board filled with pegs for catching them.

There is also a tiddledy-winks game to be played upon the same target-board with perforated bone discs instead of chips, which is of merit equal to the regular quoits.

The game is very bright and attractive, as well as very simple to play. It is adapted to the use of children or young people.

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
interesting
type · 
catalog
tw-ref-ID · 
2905
published in · 
Annual Catalogue
date · 
1898 Season
title · 
Annual Catalogue
by · 
McLoughlin Bros.
citation · 
page 135
content

No. 850. TIDDLEDY WINKS — No. 0, 25 Cents.

No illustration

Duranoid Winks.
Box 3 x 4½ inches.

This game is similar to No. 1 wood pot, except that it has "Winks" and "Tiddledies" of duranoid instead of bone. This is neatly put up and a good Tiddledy Winks game, but is not quite so pleasant to play as a set with the bone winks.

No. 851. — TIDDLEDY WINKS — No. 1, 30 Cents.

No illustration

Size, 3 x 4½ inches, wood pots.
" 4½x 4½ " glass pots.

The game is played the same as that described under Tiddledy Winks, No. 2, above. These sets have not mats, but are intended to be used on a soft table cover. One to four may play.

We regard the wood pot as preferable to the glass for children, as it is much safer. The glass pot gives an attractive resonant sound as the chips fall into it, which induces some to prefer it.

No. 852.—TIDDLEDY WINKS — No. 2.
50 Cents.

Illustration of game with woman's hand at right shooting winks off soft pad towards pot at left. Game is marked "PATENT NOV. 18, 1890"

4½ x 8 inches.

The game of Tiddledy Winks is played with six round bone chips, or "Winks," ⅝ of an inch in diameter, one large chip, 1⅛ inches in diameter, a soft mat or table cover for each player, and a cup or "pot" for common use.

To play, a small chip is put on the mat; the large chip, grasped between the forefinger and thumb, is pressed upon its centre and drawn steadily away from the "pot." When the edge of the small chip, or Wink, is reached, it flies forward and upward toward the pot. The game is to put the Winks in the "pot" in this manner, as in the picture above. No. 2 has six sets of men, three mats, one for each pair of partners, and a wooden cup, or Wink pot.

The label is printed in colors.

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
interesting
type · 
catalog
tw-ref-ID · 
2906
published in · 
Annual Catalogue
date · 
1899 Season
title · 
Annual Catalogue
by · 
McLoughlin Bros.
citation · 
page 99
content

No. 490.—KING'S QUOITS

Illustration of game box cover. Cover has "KING'S" at upper right and "QUOITS" at lower left, with royal scenes in other quadrants of cover.

Size, 15 x 17 inches

This game is a parlour quoit game played with light brass rings and a target-board filled with pegs for catching them.

There is also a tiddledy-winks game to be played upon the same target-board with perforated bone discs instead of chips, which is of merit equal to the regular quoits.

The game is very bright and attractive, as well as very simple to play. It is adapted to the use of children or young people.

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
interesting
type · 
catalog
tw-ref-ID · 
2907
published in · 
Annual Catalogue
date · 
1899 Season
title · 
Annual Catalogue
by · 
McLoughlin Bros.
citation · 
page 137
content

No. 850. TIDDLEDY WINKS — No. 0, 25 Cents.

No illustration

Duranoid Winks.
Box 3 x 4½ inches.

This game is similar to No. 1 wood pot, except that it has "Winks" and "Tiddledies" of duranoid instead of bone. This is neatly put up and a good Tiddledy Winks game, but is not quite so pleasant to play as a set with the bone winks.

No. 851. — TIDDLEDY WINKS — No. 1, 30 Cents.

No illustration

Size, 3 x 4½ inches, wood pots.
" 4½x 4½ " glass pots.

The game is played the same as that described under Tiddledy Winks, No. 2, above. These sets have not mats, but are intended to be used on a soft table cover. One to four may play.

We regard the wood pot as preferable to the glass for children, as it is much safer. The glass pot gives an attractive resonant sound as the chips fall into it, which induces some to prefer it.

No. 852.—TIDDLEDY WINKS — No. 2.
50 Cents.

Illustration of game with woman's hand at right shooting winks off soft pad towards pot at left. Game is marked "PATENT NOV. 18, 1890"

4½ x 8 inches.

The game of Tiddledy Winks is played with six round bone chips, or "Winks," ⅝ of an inch in diameter, one large chip, 1⅛ inches in diameter, a soft mat or table cover for each player, and a cup or "pot" for common use.

To play, a small chip is put on the mat; the large chip, grasped between the forefinger and thumb, is pressed upon its centre and drawn steadily away from the "pot." When the edge of the small chip, or Wink, is reached, it flies forward and upward toward the pot. The game is to put the Winks in the "pot" in this manner, as in the picture above. No. 2 has six sets of men, three mats, one for each pair of partners, and a wooden cup, or Wink pot.

The label is printed in colors.

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
interesting
type · 
catalog
tw-ref-ID · 
2908
published in · 
Annual Catalogue
date · 
1900 Season
title · 
Annual Catalogue
by · 
McLoughlin Bros.
citation · 
page 101
content

No. 490.—KING'S QUOITS

Illustration of game box cover. Cover has "KING'S" at upper right and "QUOITS" at lower left, with royal scenes in other quadrants of cover.

Size, 15 x 17 inches

This game is a parlour quoit game played with light brass rings and a target-board filled with pegs for catching them.

There is also a tiddledy-winks game to be played upon the same target-board with perforated bone discs instead of chips, which is of merit equal to the regular quoits.

The game is very bright and attractive, as well as very simple to play. It is adapted to the use of children or young people.

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
interesting
type · 
catalog
tw-ref-ID · 
2909
published in · 
Annual Catalogue
date · 
1900 Season
title · 
Annual Catalogue
by · 
McLoughlin Bros.
citation · 
page 139
content

No. 850. TIDDLEDY WINKS — No. 0, 25 Cents.

No illustration

Duranoid Winks.
Box 3 x 4½ inches.

This game is similar to No. 1 wood pot, except that it has "Winks" and "Tiddledies" of duranoid instead of bone. This is neatly put up and a good Tiddledy Winks game, but is not quite so pleasant to play as a set with the bone winks.

No. 851. — TIDDLEDY WINKS — No. 1, 30 Cents.

No illustration

Size, 3 x 4½ inches, wood pots.
" 4½x 4½ " glass pots.

The game is played the same as that described under Tiddledy Winks, No. 2, above. These sets have not mats, but are intended to be used on a soft table cover. One to four may play.

We regard the wood pot as preferable to the glass for children, as it is much safer. The glass pot gives an attractive resonant sound as the chips fall into it, which induces some to prefer it.

No. 852.—TIDDLEDY WINKS — No. 2.
50 Cents.

Illustration of game with woman's hand at right shooting winks off soft pad towards pot at left. Game is marked "PATENT NOV. 18, 1890"

4½ x 8 inches.

The game of Tiddledy Winks is played with six round bone chips, or "Winks," ⅝ of an inch in diameter, one large chip, 1⅛ inches in diameter, a soft mat or table cover for each player, and a cup or "pot" for common use.

To play, a small chip is put on the mat; the large chip, grasped between the forefinger and thumb, is pressed upon its centre and drawn steadily away from the "pot." When the edge of the small chip, or Wink, is reached, it flies forward and upward toward the pot. The game is to put the Winks in the "pot" in this manner, as in the picture above. No. 2 has six sets of men, three mats, one for each pair of partners, and a wooden cup, or Wink pot.

The label is printed in colors.

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
interesting
type · 
catalog
tw-ref-ID · 
2910
published in · 
Annual Catalogue
date · 
1914
title · 
Annual Catalogue
by · 
McLoughlin Bros.
citation · 
page 29
content

No. 5555.--KING'S QUOITS
Retail $1.10, Express extra
This is a "parlor quoits" game, played by snapping brass rings on to a target board. A tiddledy-wink game may also be played with the men.

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
interesting
type · 
catalog
tw-ref-ID · 
2911
published in · 
Annual Catalogue
date · 
1914
title · 
Annual Catalogue
by · 
McLoughlin Bros.
citation · 
page 62
content

No. 850A. — TIDDLEDY WINKS No. 00

Illustration of game box cover. Shows title text, "THE GAME OF TIDDLEDY WINKS" in an ornate font on a banner angling toward upper right.

Size, 5½ x 4½ inches

This box contains a full set of bone "winks" etc. and a cup. The label is in full colors and varnished.

Put up in dozens.

No. 7728 — TIDDLEDY WINKS, No. 0

Illustration of game box cover. Cover shows cat in hat and dress skipping rope. Title: "TIDDLEDY WINKS A Round Game"

Size, 4½ x 7 inches

This box contains a full set of bone chips for 4 players and a wooden cup.

The label is lithographed in full colors and varnished.

Put up in dozens

No. 7738. — TIDDLEDY WINKS, No. 1

Illustration of game box cover. Cover is triptych with winks flying in left and right sections, and in center section, a hand from upper left is shooting winks at a glass cup with rays of light streaking from it.

Size, 8½ x 5½ inches

This box contains a full set of bone chips for 6 players, and a glass cup.

The label is in full lithographic colors and varnished.

Put up in dozens.

No. 7748.—TIDDLEDY WINKS, No. 2, COMBINATION

Illustration of game box cover. Cover shows two cats sitting behind a cauldron-shaped pot.

Size, 9 x 12½ inches

This box contains a full and handsome equipment for six players. In addition, there is a device with which two interesting target games can be played. The label is in full colors and varnished.

Put up in ½ dozens

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
interesting
type · 
catalog
tw-ref-ID · 
2912
published in · 
Annual Catalogue
date · 
1914
title · 
Annual Catalogue
by · 
McLoughlin Bros.
citation · 
page 63
content

No. 7735.—DUTCH WINKS

Illustration of game box cover. Cover shows boy and girl in Dutch-style clothing, facing right.

Size, 5½ x 5½ inches

The equipment in this set consists of sufficient bone chips for 4 players, and a glass cup. The box label is brightly lithographed in full colors.

Put up in dozens.

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
interesting
type · 
catalog
tw-ref-ID · 
2913
Annual Report of the State Board of Education and of the Commissioner of Education of New Jersey (annual report)
With Accompanying Documents
publisher · 
The Unionist-Gazette Association, State Printers
location · 
Somerville, New Jersey, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
657

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Annual Report of the State Board of Education and of the Commissioner of Education of New Jersey.
published in · 
Annual Report of the State Board of Education and of the Commissioner of Education of New Jersey
date · 
year ending 30 June 1919 published 1920
title · 
Commissioner of Education
subtitle · 
School Report
citation · 
page 70
content

The two rooms have movable seats. In one room we had a “Solomon Grundy” party for those who did not dance. I wish I could have had a movie of those people playing ” tiddledy-winks,” “straws,” etc.

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2536
Antique Toy World (magazine)
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
547

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Antique Toy World.
published in · 
Antique Toy World
date · 
September 1987
citation · 
volume 17 • issue 9 • page cover • column full
summary

Photo of The Big Game Hunter (Bruce Whitehill) with games, including Lo Lo by E.I. Horsman and Crickets on the Grass

notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2345
The Antique Trader Guide to Antique Prices (catalog)
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
548

Toggle showing 2 tiddlywinks references for The Antique Trader Guide to Antique Prices.
published in · 
The Antique Trader Guide to Antique Prices
date · 
Fall 1982
citation · 
page 37
summary

Price listing

notability rating · 
minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2346
published in · 
The Antique Trader Guide to Antique Prices
date · 
October 1982
citation · 
page 54
summary

Price listing

notability rating · 
minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2347
Antiques and Collectibles (magazine)
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
549

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Antiques and Collectibles.
published in · 
Antiques and Collectibles
date · 
June 1979
citation · 
page 17
summary

Ad by Fred Shapiro (same text as in Hobbies magazine).

tw-ref-ID · 
2348
The Antiques Journal (magazine)
publication ID · 
ISSN 0003-5963
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
550

Toggle showing 2 tiddlywinks references for The Antiques Journal.
published in · 
The Antiques Journal
date · 
December 1974
title · 
The games people played
by · 
Andrea Lovejoy
citation · 
page 22
summary

Rehash of Parker Brothers' 90 Years of Fun book.

content

Collectors who themselves played a game called “Tiddledy Winks” will want to search for Parker’s first edition of this stil popular recreational item. Born as a board game in the late 1890s the “Tiddledy Winks” success inspired variations such as “Tiddledy Winks Hopscotch” and “Tiddledy WInks Tennis”.

collection · 
transcript (NATwA)
notability rating · 
minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2349
published in · 
The Antiques Journal
date · 
May 1979
title · 
Ask Us
citation · 
volume 34 • issue 5 • page 48 • column 2
summary

Query by Rick Tucker and Fred Shapiro.

collection · 
original (NATwA); digitized image copy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2350
Journal of Applied Statistics (journal)
tw-pub-ID · 
551

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Journal of Applied Statistics.
published in · 
Journal of Applied Statistics
date · 
May 2003
title · 
A new sports ratings system: The tiddlywinks world ratings
by · 
Patrick Barrie
citation · 
volume 30 • issue 4 • page 361 to 372
content

A system for calculating relative playing strengths of tiddlywinks players is described. The method can also be used for other sports. It is specifically designed to handle cases where the number of games played in a season varies greatly between players, and thus the confidence that one can have in an assigned rating also varies greatly between players. In addition, the method is designed to handle situations in which some games in the tournament are played as individuals (“singles’), while others are played with a partner (“pairs’).

tw-ref-ID · 
2351
Proceedings of the Aristoleian Society (journal)
publisher · 
Oxford Univesity Press
associated with · 
The Aristoleian Society
tw-pub-ID · 
575

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Proceedings of the Aristoleian Society.
published in · 
Proceedings of the Aristoleian Society
date · 
2006
title · 
Games and the Good
by · 
Thomas Hurka and John Tasioulas
citation · 
volume 80 • page 239 • column 1
content source · 
www.jstor.org/stable/4107044
content

Sports are activities the successful pursuit of which characteristically invited the display of some kind of physical prowess; indeed, having the opportunity to display such prowess is part of the point of engaging in sporting activities. This is why many jib at awarding unathletic indoor games such as tiddlywinks, darts or billiards the honorific description ‘sport’.

notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2393
ARTnews (magazine)
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
552

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for ARTnews.
published in · 
ARTnews
date · 
January 1980
title · 
Unexpected Treasures of England’s Stately Homes
subtitle · 
Donatello tiddlywinks and Ming in the lavatory
citation · 
page 85
content
Photograph of the round bronze bowl by Donatello.
A 15th-century Donatello bronze, The Madonna and Child, served the Fitzwilliam family as a tiddlywinks bowl until the Victoria and Albert Museum recognized its importance.
collection · 
photocopy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2352
Association Boys (magazine)
tw-pub-ID · 
553

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Association Boys.
published in · 
Association Boys
date · 
July 1903
title · 
Boys as Savages
by · 
Edgar M. Robinson
citation · 
volume 1 • issue 4 • page 139
content

We can but mention the influence of the games and athletics of camp. Though they may vary with the locality, one thing seems to characterize them everywhere. They demand strength, and fleetness, and agility. None of the “tiddledy winks” kind of expertness counts for much. Group games as a rule predominate, and in the subordination of self to the team, as others have shown, lay the foundation for self-sacrifice and other

notability rating · 
minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2353
Association Monthly (magazine)
Official organ of the Young Women's Christian Associations of the United States of America
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
554

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Association Monthly.
published in · 
Association Monthly
date · 
May 1920
title · 
The Test of Going Home
by · 
Mabel Ward Fraser
citation · 
volume 14 • issue 5 • page 229 • column 1
content

At first thought such serious planning seems to eliminate the fun with which we habitually associate vacation days, but not to her who tries it. Her body and spirit need play as they need sunlight and fresh air. So do her friends and neighbors. For every college girl who is finer and stronger for having learned to play there are numberless girls and boys and grown-ups who do not know how. One’s very play time, then, whether it be given to tennis or tiddledy winks, may become a service of dignity and worth.

notability rating · 
minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2354
The Atlantic Monthly (magazine)
alternate name · 
The Atlantic
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
555

Toggle showing 6 tiddlywinks references for The Atlantic Monthly.
published in · 
The Atlantic Monthly
date · 
1 April 1891
column title · 
Comment on New Books
citation · 
volume 67 • whole 402 • page 565 • column 1
content

The Young Folks’ Cyclopædia of Games and Sports, by John D. Champlin, Jr., and Arthur E. Bostwick. (Holt.) Eight hundred double-columned pages, full of descriptive illustrations, and so brought to date that the noble game of Tiddledy Winks has more than a column. We object seriously to one of the rules: “A player may not intentionally cover any of his opponent’s counters.” Why, the snap is taken out of the game when one can cover accidentally only.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2355
published in · 
The Atlantic Monthly
date · 
September 1902
title · 
On the Off-Shore Lights
by · 
Louise Lyndon Sibley
citation · 
volume 90 • whole 539 • page 383 • column 1
content

” [...] ’T is long ter set. I wisht I could feel ter play tiddledy-winks,” she said wistfully.

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2356
published in · 
The Atlantic Monthly
date · 
November 1917
title · 
The Contributor’s Club
subtitle · 
The Floor
citation · 
volume 120 • page 715 • column 2
content

The only parallel that I can think of is the way in which, during very early childhood, we sometimes played tiddledywinks. When the man-made rules of that staid sport became too wearing for our advanced intellects, we used to get to snapping all at once, promiscuously. Everybody snapped everybody else’s wink, at the bull’s-eye or the eye of his neighbor, regardless. This indiscriminating sort of think lends a lawless charm most bracing to tiddledywinks, but it cancels conversation.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2357
published in · 
The Atlantic Monthly
date · 
May 1956
title · 
What shall we do with the dullards
by · 
Caspar D. Green
citation · 
page 74
content

There is no doubt that algebra, geography, English composition, civics, history, and literature are fun. But they are not fun like dancing, basetball, tiddlywinks, or tag; they are fun like algebra, geography, English composition, civics, history, and literature.

collection · 
excerpt (NATwA)
notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2358
published in · 
The Atlantic Monthly
date · 
April 1990
title · 
Hollywood: The Ad
by · 
Mark Crispin Miller
citation · 
page 41 or later
tw-ref-ID · 
2359
published in · 
The Atlantic Monthly
date · 
June 1994
title · 
Busy, busy, busy
by · 
Cullen Murphy
citation · 
volume 273 • issue 6 • page 24 • column 3
content

Larry Kahn, of the North American Tiddlywinks Association, in Silver Spring, Maryland, explains that most of the 100 dues-paying “winkers” in his group are men, and that most have a background in mathematics or computers. In the United States major tiddlywinks tournaments are held four or five times a year. NATwA has a sister organization, known as ETwA, in England; of English winkers Kahn observes, “They’re even nerdier than we are.” Like participants in many other sports and games, winkers have developed a distinctive jargon. They may say, for instance, “I can’t pot my nurdled wink, so I’ll piddle you free and you can boondock a red.” Tiddlywinks apparently enjoyed something of an efflorescence in the United States in the late 1960s and the 1970s, after which it entered a period of mild decline. Kahn blames this on the nation’s having experienced a time of cynical economic opportunism and creeping spiritual discontent, which together eroded the bedrock of silliness upon which the edifice of tiddlywinks is erected. Or so I inferred. Actually, what he said when asked about the cause of the decline was simply, “Reagan.”

collection · 
digitized copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
important
tw-ref-ID · 
2360
Australian Law Times (journal)
location · 
Australia
tw-pub-ID · 
229

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Australian Law Times.
published in · 
Australian Law Times
date · 
1890
summary

A report on whether the term "tiddledy winks" is libelous.

notes · 
Cited in an article in the Cincinnati Enquirer, 13 December 1890, page 234, column 6.
tw-ref-ID · 
814
Baseball Weekly (magazine)
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
556

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Baseball Weekly.
published in · 
Baseball Weekly
date · 
18 May 1994
title · 
Waxing nostalgic for weathered leather we once wore
by · 
Lisa Winston
citation · 
page 34
content

The last one picked for every team from softball to tiddlywinks.

collection · 
digitized copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2361
The Billboard (magazine)
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
557

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for The Billboard.
published in · 
The Billboard
date · 
18 August 1951
column title · 
Television-Radio
title · 
The Rayburn and Finch Show
citation · 
page 9 • column 1
content

In spite of these negative factors, the boys work very well together and deliver a solid number of yocks. Their scene from Shakespeare, the play-by-play of the tiddly-winks championship from the Harvard field house, the Hollywood number interlaced with a satire on movie columnists, were all on the strong side.

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2362
The Black Cat (magazine)
A Monthly Magazine of Original Short Stories
location · 
Boston, Massachusetts, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
558

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for The Black Cat.
published in · 
The Black Cat
date · 
July 1903
title · 
An Arctic Scoop
by · 
Walter Tallmade Arndt; Philip Loring Allen
citation · 
volume 8 • issue 10 • page 16
content

As the papers never published any telegraph news their duties were not onerous and they spent most of their time playing tiddledywinks and tit-tat-too at the Red Walrus.

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2363
The Book World (magazine)
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
560

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for The Book World.
published in · 
The Book World
date · 
March 1901
column title · 
SPORTS
title · 
The Joys of Sport
by · 
W. Y. Stevenson
citation · 
volume 6 • issue 3 • page 270 • column 1
content

Mr. Stevenson is what is called an all-around sportsman. He has tried them all. Take golf, for example. “Gawf,” he says, “is a great game, but shiver me niblicks if I think it comes up to tiddledy-winks.” It is played “with a couple of farms, a river or so, two or three sand hills, a number of implements resembling dentists’ tools, a strange language, much like Hindoostani, any old clothes and a large assortment of oaths.”

notability rating · 
minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2365
Bookman (magazine)
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
559

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Bookman.
published in · 
Bookman
date · 
September 1926
citation · 
page 90
summary

Quick book review of Sinclair Lewis’ book, Mantrap.

content

MANTRAP—Sinclair Lewis—Harcourt, Brace. The great realist plays an amusing game of tiddlywinks in the north woods.

collection · 
transcript (NATwA)
notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2364
Boys’ Life (magazine)
associated with · 
Boy Scouts of America
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
561

Toggle showing 5 tiddlywinks references for Boys’ Life.
published in · 
Boys’ Life
date · 
July 1916
title · 
BOYS PLAY “GRASSHOPPER TENNIS”
citation · 
volume 6 • issue 4 • page 35 • column 2
content

BOYS PLAY “GRASSHOPPER TENNIS”

in Camp or on Vacation, day or night, rain or shine

Most interesting, exciting, and snappy; the game sensation of 1916.

A combination of Lawn Tennis and Tiddledy-Winks. Two, three or four can play.

It’s just the thing for those rainy days or dull nights.

Comrades club together and send $1 for a barrel of fun.

Send for a booklet how to run a Championship Tennis Tournament.

Agents wanted

C. H. Belknap, 46 Fulton Street, Brooklyn, N.Y.

collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
notability rating · 
important
tw-ref-ID · 
2366
published in · 
Boys’ Life
date · 
September 1928
title · 
Words Across the Net
by · 
Harold M. Sherman
citation · 
volume 18 • issue 9 • page 12 • column 2
content

The big match of the day is to be a clash between Little Bill Johnston and Big Bill Tilden and Sandy keeps telling us to wait for this, that “we ain’t seen nothing yet.” But we think we’re seeing plenty. We’ve seen enough already to let us know we haven’t even been playing tiddledy-winks.

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2367
published in · 
Boys’ Life
date · 
October 1930
title · 
On the Last Down
by · 
Harold M. Sherman
citation · 
volume 20 • issue 10 • page 5 • column 3
content

No coach cared to jeopardize youths who were not physically fitted to look out for themselves on the bruising gridiron. Football was no game of tiddledy-winks. You had to be strong enough and tough enough to survive on the bottom of jamming, twisting heap of elbows, fists, knees, feet and heavy bodies—with your face pushed into the dirt and your legs and arms in anything but a comfortable position!

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2368
published in · 
Boys’ Life
date · 
October 1931
title · 
Radio Control
by · 
Henry B. Comstock
citation · 
volume 21 • issue 10 • page 18
content

“What tha blankety-blank-blank did you think you was doing? Having a game of tiddly-winks, or three deep, or slap the baby, or what?”

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2369
published in · 
Boys’ Life
date · 
July 1975
title · 
Wink Tennis
by · 
Bob Loeffelbein and John Taylor
citation · 
page 52 to 53 • column 2 (page 52); 1 (page 53)
summary

Constructing a custom “Wink Tennis” table game. With photograph of two boys playing and an illustration of the tennis court.

collection · 
photocopy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2370
The Bridgemen's Magazine (magazine)
associated with · 
International Association of Bridge, Structural and Ornamental Iron Workers
location · 
American Central Life Building, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
563

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for The Bridgemen's Magazine.
published in · 
The Bridgemen's Magazine
date · 
April 1918
title · 
(no title)
by · 
J. Stitt Wilson
citation · 
volume 18 • issue 4 • page 195 • column 2
content

There is only one crime in human history, and we are seeking it now. That crime is the assumption by any kind of a specimen of a human being that dares to possess the earth or rule and deny the humblest human being the highest opportunity of a son of God on earth. There is no other crime; the rest are the tiddledy-winks acts of our human failure. That is the only crime, and correspondingly the supremest virtue in the world, the supremest significance of being a human being, is to stand up for the rights of man, to stand up for all men, and if need be to die for man against that crime of the ages.—J. Stitt Wilson.

notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2372
Bucks County Life (magazine)
location · 
Bucks County, Pennsylvania, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
565

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Bucks County Life.
published in · 
Bucks County Life
date · 
October 1962
summary

Coverage of Oxford match against Bucks County Playhouse actors.

notability rating · 
potentially interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2374
Buddy Book Treasures (magazine)
publisher · 
The Children's House
location · 
Boston, Massachusetts, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
564

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Buddy Book Treasures.
published in · 
Buddy Book Treasures
date · 
November 1928
summary

Catalog-like entry for tiddley winks

tw-ref-ID · 
2373
Business Week (magazine)
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
183

Toggle showing 3 tiddlywinks references for Business Week.
published in · 
Business Week
date · 
4 December 1971
title · 
TEXAS TIDDLYWINKS
by · 
Bill Mauldin (editorial cartoonist for the Chicago Sun-Times)
citation · 
page 26 • column 2
summary

Bill Mauldin cartoon of John Connally playing “Texas Tiddlywinks” with dollar and yen.

collection · 
original (Drix/NATwA); digital copy (NATwA); photocopy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2375
published in · 
Business Week
date · 
2 October 1978
title · 
Where nuclear plants get grins—not growls
citation · 
edition Industrial Edition • page 22C
tw-ref-ID · 
2376
published in · 
Business Week
date · 
2 April 1984
title · 
High-Tech Exports: Sparks are About to Fly
citation · 
page 30
tw-ref-ID · 
2377
The Business World (magazine)
publisher · 
Business World Company
location · 
Tribune Building, New York, New York, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
567

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for The Business World.
published in · 
The Business World
date · 
15 October 1906
column title · 
Business Articles in the Magazines
title · 
Fortunes in Games
citation · 
volume 26 • issue 10 • page 828 • column 2
content

“Tiddledy-winks,” a game in which flipping small counters into a cup plays the chief part, has proved a gold mine in its way. This game was first played by some members of a club who were waiting for a card table. One of them started to try to flip a poker chip into his glass with a coin, and, as he failed, a friend thought he could do better. This led to bets being made, and in the end nearly all the members who were present in the club had gathered round the table and were breathless with excitement over this new game. Eventually it was decided to patent the game, and since then the public have paid something like two hundred throusand dollars to the retailers of “tiddledy-winks”

collection · 
digital copy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2378
The Camera (magazine)
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
568

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for The Camera.
published in · 
The Camera
date · 
August 1932
by · 
Bruce Metcalfe (photographer)
citation · 
volume 45 • issue 2 • page 107
summary

“TIDDLYWINKS” photograph from the Fourth Chicago International Photographic Salon.

collection · 
original (NATwA)
notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2379
Canadian Magazine (magazine)
location · 
Canada
Notes

Sunday newspaper magazine insert?

tw-pub-ID · 
177

Toggle showing 2 tiddlywinks references for Canadian Magazine.
published in · 
Canadian Magazine
date · 
February 1971
title · 
He Squidges! He Pots!… Canada Has A Great Chance In The North American Tiddlywinks Championships
summary

Includes photograph(s)

tw-ref-ID · 
542
published in · 
Canadian Magazine
date · 
1 May 1971
title · 
Canada's great tiddlywinks hope: they would up third
citation · 
page 24 to 25
summary

Includes photograph(s)

content

Perhaps, on balance, our forecasts have been pretty accurate. With the notable exception, that is, of tiddlywinks.

Black and white photograph of seven winkers looking at the camera.

[...]

collection · 
photocopy (Drix/NATwA); digital of photocopy copy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
541
Catalog of Copyright Entries (official records)
publisher · 
Library of Congress
location · 
Washington, District of Columbia, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
569

Toggle showing 7 tiddlywinks references for Catalog of Copyright Entries.
published in · 
Catalog of Copyright Entries
date · 
1928
citation · 
volume 25 • section Part 1 New Series • page 201 • column 1
content

Alderman, Fairchild co.*, Rochester, N. Y. 6519-6526

Blinky blinx- tiddledy winks. Directions for playing the game. no. 411. Sheet. © Feb. 4, 1928; 2 c.and aff. Feb. 20 ; A 1066418.

tw-ref-ID · 
2380
published in · 
Catalog of Copyright Entries
date · 
1928
citation · 
volume 25 • section Part 1 New Series • page 834 • column 1
content

Parker bros., inc.*, Salem, Mass.

Directions for playing. 1928. Each. sheet. 26047-26059 [...]

Pyramid tiddledy winks. © May 8; 2 c. and aff. May 11; A 1076759.

tw-ref-ID · 
2381
published in · 
Catalog of Copyright Entries
date · 
1928
citation · 
volume 25 • section Part 1 New Series • page 1004 • column 1
content

Parker bros., inc.*, Salem, Mass. 31017-31024
Directions for playing. 1928.

Games of base ball: Steeple chase [!] Hop in the Tub: Tiddledy winks. © May 18; 2 c. and aff. June 4; A 1079805.

tw-ref-ID · 
2382
published in · 
Catalog of Copyright Entries
date · 
1936
citation · 
volume 30 • section Part 4: Works of Art, Etc. New Series • page 24 • column 1
content

Einson-Freeman co., inc. 1282-1311

[Box design]: Baseball tiddledy winks, 1603, Basket-ball tiddledy winks, 1600. […] © Mar. 7, 1935; K 25331-2533[2] [...].

[Game design]: Baseball tiddledy winks, 1603, Basket-ball tiddledy winks, 1600. […] © Mar. 7, 1935; K 25336, 25340 [...].

tw-ref-ID · 
2383
published in · 
Catalog of Copyright Entries
date · 
1936
citation · 
volume 30 • section Part 4: Works of Art, Etc. New Series • page 42 • column 2
content

Gabriel (Saml) sons & co. [...] 2998

Tiddledy winks, T 220. © Mar. 1, 1934; K [...] 22499

tw-ref-ID · 
2384
published in · 
Catalog of Copyright Entries
date · 
January 1949 to June 1949
citation · 
volume 23 • section 3rd Series Volume 3 Part 1B • issue 1 • page 45 • column 1
content

Bradley (Milton) Company ©

Tiddledy winks tennis; a game for 2, 3 or 4 players. Instructions. 4808. Springfield, Mass., © 9Mar48. AA103131.

tw-ref-ID · 
2385
published in · 
Catalog of Copyright Entries
date · 
July 1969 to December 1969
citation · 
volume 23 • section 3rd Series Part 1 Section 1 • issue 2 • page 2671 • column 1
content

WARNER U.S.A.

Fill the ark; a Bible tiddlywinks game. Appl. author: Warner Press,Inc. © Warner U.S.A. a.a.d.o.W arner Press, Inc.; 15Jan69; A79259.

tw-ref-ID · 
2386
Century (magazine)
location · 
New York, New York, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
570

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Century.
published in · 
Century
date · 
May 1919
title · 
The Archer
by · 
Richard Matthews Hallet
citation · 
page 585
content

In the case in question they spun away from the strongbacks like tiddledewinks.

collection · 
transcript (NATwA)
notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2387
Century Advertising Supplement (to Century Magazine) (magazine)
location · 
USA
Notes

Available at the Library of Congress.

tw-pub-ID · 
571

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Century Advertising Supplement (to Century Magazine).
published in · 
Century Advertising Supplement (to Century Magazine)
date · 
December 1890
by · 
E. I. Horsman
tw-ref-ID · 
2388
Changing Times (magazine)
The Kiplinger Magazine
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
572

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Changing Times.
published in · 
Changing Times
date · 
October 1949
title · 
So You Want to Invent a Game
citation · 
page 29
content

With a few exceptions, Parker Brothers own almost all the well-known proprietary games. Many old games, such as chess, checkers, Chinese checker and tiddlywinks, are open games, not owned by anyone. They are in the public domain.

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2389
Chatterbox (magazine)
publisher · 
The Page Company
location · 
53 Beacon Street, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Notes

John Erskine Clarke, M.A. (founder)

tw-pub-ID · 
573

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Chatterbox.
published in · 
Chatterbox
date · 
1919
title · 
The Home Toy-Shop
subtitle · 
I. Games for a Rainy Day
citation · 
page 28 to 29 • column 1 (page 28); 1 (page 29)
content

You mark out a square on a piece of stout cardboard severn inches by seven inches, and rule it into forty-nine equal squares of one inch. On twenty-five separate one-inch squares of card put the numbers one to twenty-five, and set these on the board in any way, the positions being changed after each game. In the illustration (fig. 1), the twenty-five numbered pieces form a compact square in the twenty-five inner compartments.

Illustration of a 7 by 7 array of square cells, with most but not all of them marked with a number from 1 to 25 and also C, A, and B.
Fig. 1 .—A Walling-off Game.

The same board can be used as a scoring-board f[or the] well-known game of “Tiddley-Winks,” the nu[mbered] squares being distributed in any uneven way.

Illustration of a stack of 4 bound books at left and the same at right, with a wire spanning across them. A human figure is balanced on the wire above the table surface.
Fig. 2.—A Tiddleywinks Target.

A target can be set up as shown in fig. 2, for ‘Tiddley-Wink’ players to shoot at. Cut out some comical cardboard figure, about two inches long, and across the chest glue a strip of match-wood. A few books with a lenght of thread twisted tightly round the topmost make a suitable tight-rope on which the figure can be balanced by means of the short piece of match-wood. When [...] the small counters should be placed on a double [...] cloth, and then chipped by the edge of a larger [counter.]

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2390
Child Development (journal)
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
574

Toggle showing 2 tiddlywinks references for Child Development.
published in · 
Child Development
date · 
March 1963
title · 
Development of sex differences in play choices during preadolescence
by · 
Brian Sutton-Smith, B. G. Rosenberg, and E. F. Morgan Jr.
citation · 
page 121
tw-ref-ID · 
2391
published in · 
Child Development
date · 
1964
title · 
Measuring Masculinity and Femininity by Children’s game choices
by · 
Richard N. Walker
citation · 
page 965
tw-ref-ID · 
2392
Children's Work for Children (magazine)
publisher · 
Women’s Foreign Missionary Organizations
associated with · 
Board of Foreign Missions of the Presbyterian Church
tw-pub-ID · 
578

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Children's Work for Children.
published in · 
Children's Work for Children
date · 
April 1892
title · 
Geographical Tiddledywinks
citation · 
volume 17 • issue 4 • page 69
content

A half-dozen, little full-blooded Indian girls, were in my room a few evenings since, playing Tiddledywinks, a game sent us from the east.

collection · 
original (NATwA)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2396
Christianity Today (magazine)
tw-pub-ID · 
579

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Christianity Today.
published in · 
Christianity Today
date · 
12 September 1994
title · 
Blinded by the ‘lite:’ dying modernity is “into” spirituality
citation · 
volume 38 • issue 10 • page 14 • column 2
tw-ref-ID · 
2397
Collier's (magazine)
The National Weekly
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
580

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Collier's.
published in · 
Collier's
date · 
8 February 1919
title · 
Signor Pug
by · 
Mildred Cram
citation · 
page 7 • column 3
content

There’s trouble down there, and I’ve been playing tiddledy-winks on Broadway!

collection · 
photocopy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2398
The Colorado Magazine (magazine)
location · 
Colorado, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
581

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for The Colorado Magazine.
published in · 
The Colorado Magazine
date · 
April 1893
title · 
Mrs. Gaskell's Tiddledy-Winks
by · 
Carol Foster
citation · 
volume 1 • page 267 to 270
content
Cartoon depicting a man sitting in a chair at left, with his hands on a table playing tiddlywinks. A woman appears at right, standing in front of a chair. Another man is observing at rear left.
Mrs. Gaskell's Little Game.

MRS. GASKELL determined to give a party. Not a crush with trains, and décolleté, and all that the resources of the village quite precluded anything of the kind—but just a “small and early,” which should embrace only the best families. And it should be something out of the ordinary run of tea and gossip—she was resolved upon that—but what? It was a very proper community, and cards and dancing were not to be thought of, and quiltings and apple-bees were voted old-fashioned—still there must be something by which sociability could be galvanized intolife and she did not despair. Her horizon was a little broader than that of her neighbors, for she had a city sister to whom she was indebted for many a suggestion and to her she carried the present perplexity. Letters of advice and counsel flew back and forth and at length, one day. everybody that was anybody in Clinton received a card like the following:

Mrs. Gaskell
will be pleased to see
you on Tuesday, March 31st,
from 2 till 5 o’clock.

Tiddledy-Winks.

It was a bomb shell! Everyone felt flattered to be invited to Mrs. Gaskell’s, as she was popularly supposed to know what was what, but that mystic word in the left hand corner was a puzzler. It might be an old story in other localities but rustic Clinton had never seen nor heard it. And then only ladies were invited, which, in itself was an innovation—what were we coming to anyhow?

Grand-father Jones put on his best glasses, sighted the card at arm’s length and then peered at it near by, turned it wrong side up. and up side down but could make nothing of it. Grand-daughter Nelli peeped over his shoulder, and said, maybe Mrs. Gaskell forgot to cross the first letter and it was an “F” instead of a “T” and ” Winks” was his last name.

Mrs. Bird thought it must mean that you should bring your babies, and when they were “Tiddled” awhile, they could be laid away for the traditional forty winks while their mothers enjoyed themselves, and she “must say it was very thoughtful in Mary Ann Gaskell, who had no children of her own.”

Mr. Larkin, who was the village politician “‘lowed it was a kind o’ female suffrage meetin’ and for his part he hadn’t much opinion o’ hen parties, no how.”

Some thought it might be a joke, others a surprise, and one or two ventured to ask Mrs. Gaskell herself about it, but she only smiled mysteriously and bade them come and see.

As might be expected, on the appointed day every guest was present, and on tiptoe with curiosity. When they found the pleasant parlors filled with tables, and each flanked by four chairs, some of the older ladies put on their severest looks, as though scenting wickedness in the air, but Mrs. Gaskell was deaf and blind to every such symptom, and, producing six neat little boxes, proceeded to explain the beauties and intricacies of “Progressive Tiddledy-Winks.” Such a chattering as there was! “How do you do it?” “I never saw the game before in my life.” “Who plays first?” “When do you begin?” and kindred questions were heard in all directions. A less efficient hostess would have been distracted. But partners were at length chosen, and the game settled down after the well-known rules of progressive euchre only here they were not well-known, and it took some time to learn that the winners at lower tables always progressed towards the top, and that the winners at the top remained there so long as they continued winners. It was a lively scene, and when a half-dozen games had been played, nobody wanted to stop, even though a lovely supper stood ready for them.

After supper, a new surprise awaited the guests. Mrs. Gaskell announced that she had provided a little souvenir of the occasion for the lady who had won most games, and also one for her who had least. What a counting up of scores there was. and when one prize was awarded to Mrs.Davies, and the other to Miss Hart, everyone declared that they would have worked twice as hard if they had known there was anything half so lovely among the possibilities. And so the party broke up, all declaring this was a red-letter day in Clinton society.

But this was not the end. The complacency with which Mrs. Gaskell had regarded the success of her party, was turned to gall and wormwood, when, on the next Sabbath, Parson Brown preached a sermon on the iniquity of gambling. As it was a sin entirely unknown in the village, the discourse seemed as innocent as one against the drama, for instance, in the wilds of Africa, and it took Mrs. Gaskell a good while to realize that her weil-meant attempt at entertainment was being used to “point a moral and adorn a tale.” The reverend speaker spoke of the wiles of theDevil, of the wicked amusements of the city being transplanted into our peaceful community, of the unholy passions that were aroused thereby, and especially the depths of depravity that followed the sin of covetousness. and as the full force of it all grew upon her, Mrs. Gaskell went home full of wrath and indignation. A night’s rest did much to calm her feelings, and as she reflected that the parson probably knew as little of any gambling game as he evidently did of Tiddledy-Winks, a smile played about her mouth, and she determined to give another entertainment, but this time for “gentlemen only.” Shortly after dinner she sent out three dainty little notes, one to Rev. Zephaniah Brown, and one each to the two elders of his church,Messrs. Davies and Burt. Each asked the person addessed to call on her that evening, and were all exactly alike, save that the Parson was asked to come at seven, Elder Davies at half-past seven, and Elder Burt at eight. As the time was so short, she thought it unlikely they would have an opportunity to compare notes, but in any event she must take her chance of that.

At seven o’clock Mr. Brown rang the bell, and was shown into the pleasant parlor, where Mrs. Gaskell received him in her most bewitching manner. But the Reverend gentleman was ready for Delilah and wore his most forbidding frown—he made nodoubt that his sermon had struck home and was prepared to do his duty in admonishing a repentant sinner or calling down the terrors of the law on a stiff-necked and rebellious one. Mrs. Gaskell read him like an open book, and after a few general remarks led the conversation to the subject in hand.”

Mr. Brown,” she said, ” I took the liberty of intruding on your valuable time to ask you who it is that has been introducing gambling into this quiet nook? You know my husband is a Justice of the Peace, and I want to urge him to get out a warrant and stop such wickedness.”

The minister looked a little nonplussed, but bringing the tips of the fingers of both hands together, said solemnly, “He that regardeth iniquity in his heart is no less wicked than he that committeth the overt act.”

Mrs. Gaskell dropped her anxious look and settling back into her chair with a sigh of relief, said, “Oh, that is it! Of course it is very wicked, but I cannot help being glad that no one has really done it yet, because you know some one else might have seen it and been led astray. But,” sheadded, looking up into his face with the confidingness of a child “do you think it would do to arrest them for thinking about gambling?”

Mr. Brown had an uncomfortable feeling of being quizzed, and said severely, ” Madam, I am sorry to say that it is by you our young people are being led astray.”

”I!” was the exclamation, in great surprise;” I beseech you tell me how that can be?”

”Yes, Madam, you, with your unholy games.”

”Is it possible.” was the reply, “that by all these dreadful things you mean my poor little Tiddledy-Winks party?”

”I know nothing of the names by which the Devil chooses to deceive even the very elect at times, but from what I have heard, I believe this to be one of those sinful games that lead to all manner of iniquity.”

It was hard for Mrs. Gaskell to look becomingly penitent and serious, but she said, “Surely Mr. Brown, you have never seen the game,” and before the gentleman could remonstrate she had pulled from behind a screen a little table tightly covered with felt, with a box of Tiddledy-Winks in the center. Talking as fast as she could to prevent interruption, she went on: “Of course I will never play again if you really disapprove it, and I am very sorry I should have been the means of introducing it to others, but really it does not seem quite fair that you should altogether condemn us without seeing what the game is. Just look at that simple little box—you will see that it is a game in which there can be no money, no stake of any kind—just these little bits of ivory and that tiny giass. We place the glass in the middle, so—and divide up these little ‘winks’ (isn’t it a funny name?), putting six on each side the table like that; then suppose I was the first player, I would take this largest bit of ivory and try to flip a small one into the glass. There, you see I got that one in, and that gives me another trial—there, that one missed—you see it is quite a silly game, but some persons are more successful in playing than others.”

The Parson listened in spite of himself and as he watched the slim little fingers toying with the bits of ivory, he thought he could put them in oftener in spite of his larger hands. Mrs. Gaskell went on explaining, he got interested without intending it. and did not realize that they were really playing a game till the door opened noiselessly, and Elder Davies was shown into the room. The Parson looked very much confused, but Mrs. Gaskell never changed her position, only offered her hand cordially and said, “I am so glad you have come Mr. Davies; I was showing Mr. Brown how much he was mistaken about my poor Tiddledy -Winks; now I can show you at the same time. Pray take a seat there between us. Place those six little green buttons in front of you and with the larger one in your hand, you will soon see what an innocent amusement it is.”

”Thank you.” said Mr. Davies, who was delighted to find himself in such good company; “my wife has told me a great deal about the delightful time she had at your party, and it is contrary to all discipline, you know, for the Elder’s wife to know more than the Elder!”

And thus it happened that for half an hour Mrs. Gaskell had a very lively three-handed game in her parlor, which was only interrupted by the entrance of Elder Burt. To say that all three gentlemen were astonished is to put it very mildly, and the hostess was the only one thoroughly at ease. With the sweetest smile, she shook hands with the new guest, and. making room for him beside herself, said:

”You are just in time Mr. Burt. Someone has been maligning my little game and I was showing our good friends here what a harmless thing it is. I could not be happy a moment if the leading gentlemen of the community disapproved it,” and she bowed comprehensively, “but really I think when you know what it is you will all agree with me that it is better than talking about one’s neighbors as we are so apt to do when we have nothing special to occupy us. Mr. Davies, will you please pass me those small white men that Mr. Burt may see for himself how it is?”

At last Mrs. Gaskell felt herself a success. In spite of prejudice and the pride of consistency, she was playing a four-handed game in her own parlor with the minister and both his elders. The time flew on fairy wings for these staid gentlemen, all unused as they were to any form of amuse-ment and when at length the door opened again, and a trim little maid entered with cups of strong aromatic coffee, such as elderly men love, together with some dainty cakes, all were surprised and just a little ashamed to find that it was late. Mrs. Gaskell bowed them sweetly from the door, and she always said her only regret was that her husband was from home and did not witness her victory.

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2399
Computer Weekly (magazine)
location · 
UK
tw-pub-ID · 
582

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Computer Weekly.
published in · 
Computer Weekly
date · 
late 1979 ?
notes · 
Mentioned in Winking World 34, page 6.
tw-ref-ID · 
2400
Confidential Price List and Telegraph Code (catalog)
publisher · 
McLoughlin Brothers
location · 
New York, New York, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
795

Toggle showing 2 tiddlywinks references for Confidential Price List and Telegraph Code.
published in · 
Confidential Price List and Telegraph Code
date · 
1894 to 1895
title · 
Kings Quoits
by · 
McLoughlin Brothers
citation · 
page 18 • column 1
content

Code: SPIRAL
Nos.: 490
King's Quoits
Price Per Gross: 72 00

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
interesting
type · 
catalog
tw-ref-ID · 
2899
published in · 
Confidential Price List and Telegraph Code
date · 
1894 to 1895
by · 
McLoughlin Brothers
citation · 
page 25 • column 1
content

Code: Pansy
Nos.: 850
Tiddledy Winks No. 0, [crossed out: Duranoid] Bone [written in] Chips
Price per Gross: $12.00

Code: Parade
Nos. 851
Tiddledy Winks No. 1, Bone Chips ...
Price per Gross: $18.00

Code: Parcel
Nos. 852
Tiddledy Winks No. 2, Bone Chips ...
Price per Gross: $36.00

Code: Parish
Nos. 853
Tiddledy Winks No. 3, Bone Chips ...
Price per Gross: $72.00

Code: Padlock
Nos. 854
Game of Hurdles ...
Price per Gross: $36.00 not determined to be tiddlywinks

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
interesting
type · 
catalog
tw-ref-ID · 
2900
The Contemporary Review (magazine)
publisher · 
Isbister and Company Limited
location · 
15 and 16 Tavistock Street, Covent Garden, London, London, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
584

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for The Contemporary Review.
published in · 
The Contemporary Review
date · 
August 1894
title · 
The Home or the Barrack for the Children of the State
by · 
Henrietta O. Barrett
citation · 
volume 66 • page 246 • column 1
content

Recreation rooms were provided for both boys and girls, and the long winter evenings were anything but dreary, for when school was done and work over the children gathered in the brilliantly lit, hot-pipe-heated rooms and played draughts, bagatelle, lotto, or tiddly-winks.

collection · 
transcript (NATwA)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2403
The Cosmopolitan (magazine)
publisher · 
The Cosmopolitan Press
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
585

Toggle showing 3 tiddlywinks references for The Cosmopolitan.
published in · 
The Cosmopolitan
date · 
July 1895
title · 
The Maltese Cat
by · 
Rudyard Kipling
citation · 
volume 19 • issue 3 • page 308 • column 2
content

“Who said anything about biting? I’m not playing tiddlywinks. I’m playing the game.”

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2404
published in · 
The Cosmopolitan
date · 
October 1895
title · 
The Parker Games
subtitle · 
They are Played in a Million Homes
citation · 
volume 19 • issue 6 • page unnumbered, 6 pages after 704
content

Our illustrated catalogue describing “Innocence Abroad,” “Chivalry,” “Penny Post,” “Kringle,” “Tiddledy Winks,” and 100 other games, on receipt of 2c. stamp.

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2405
published in · 
The Cosmopolitan
date · 
~ April 1976
title language · 
English
citation · 
page 38 to 39
summary

"Tiddly-Winks™" bra and lingerie from The WARNACO Group

collection · 
original (Rick Tucker collection)
notability rating · 
not tiddlywinks game
tw-ref-ID · 
3802
Current Opinion (magazine)
tw-pub-ID · 
586

Toggle showing 2 tiddlywinks references for Current Opinion.
published in · 
Current Opinion
date · 
September 1891
column title · 
Current Literature
title · 
Brief and Critical Comment
citation · 
volume 8 • issue 1 • page 159 to 160
content

Mrs. Amelia E. Barr, writing in The North American Review, takes this view of the matter: “The true writer gives his whole intellect and his whole time to his work, and he is satisfied to do so. He has no time and no interest to spare for tiddledy-winks and donkey parties, nor even for progressive euchre. […]”

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2406
published in · 
Current Opinion
date · 
July 1924
title · 
The Golden Honeymoon
by · 
Ring Lardner
citation · 
page 57
tw-ref-ID · 
2407
Delta Upsilon
associated with · 
Delta Upsilon
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
335

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Delta Upsilon.
published in · 
Delta Upsilon
date · 
16 September 1907
title · 
Looking Backward
subtitle · 
"Before-the-Charter" Reminiscences
by · 
William Hardy Alexander
citation · 
volume 25 • issue 4 • page 333
summary

Reprinted from "News of our Chapter" of the Toronto Chapter.

content

Well, this quartette of worthies was thusly gathered one autumn evening on Breadline—Lord ! Breadalbane—Street: enter to them the present writer, a sophomore, who, having accepted the invitation of the "frat." a day or so previously, mainly because he didn't know how to refuse, had now come to be initiated. Don't talk to me about bum initiations ! That was the limit far and away. I came over prepared to be killed, if necessary, and all they made me do was to swear politely eternal brotherhood and all the rest of the tiddledy-winks. Was I sorry I had joined ? Let us be quite frank.

links · 
Google Books – digitized image (free) (tw-ref-link-id 2340)
tw-ref-ID · 
1428
Dimensions (magazine)
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
588

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Dimensions.
published in · 
Dimensions
date · 
around Winter 1983 to 1984
summary

Listing of NATwA’s Continentals tournament

tw-ref-ID · 
2409
Disarmament Times (magazine)
associated with · 
United Nations Non-Governmental Organization Disarmament Committee
tw-pub-ID · 
589

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Disarmament Times.
published in · 
Disarmament Times
date · 
6 October 1980
title · 
Back to the drawing board on the NPT!
citation · 
page 4
summary

Figurative use of the word tiddlywinks.

collection · 
transcript (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2410
Discover (magazine)
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
590

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Discover.
published in · 
Discover
date · 
April 1993
title · 
Loops of space
citation · 
volume 14 • issue 4 • page 60(9)
summary

(a possible theory of quantum gravity), mention.

tw-ref-ID · 
2411
The Draughts Players’ Weekly Bulletin (magazine)
publisher · 
J. A. Kear & Son
location · 
5, Beaumont Street, Stapleton Road, Bristol, Bristol, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
592

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for The Draughts Players’ Weekly Bulletin.
published in · 
The Draughts Players’ Weekly Bulletin
date · 
21 November 1896
column title · 
London Notes
citation · 
volume 1 • issue 3 • page 35 • column 1
content

I am the happy possessor of a monster pen’north in the “Sunlight” Yearbook.” In addition to treatises on Veal stuffing, Tiddley Winks and Double Sixes, the work contains an article on Draughts in which the gifted author is good enough to remark that the game “may call forth a fair amount of skill.”

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2413
Dun’s Business Month
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
593

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Dun’s Business Month.
published in · 
Dun’s Business Month
date · 
November 1981
title · 
Satisfying Cable’s Vast Appetite for Programming
citation · 
page 84
collection · 
excerpt (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2414
The Economist (magazine)
location · 
UK
tw-pub-ID · 
594

Toggle showing 5 tiddlywinks references for The Economist.
published in · 
The Economist
date · 
18 November 1947
title · 
End of Act Two
citation · 
page 626 • column 1
content

The storm was long predicted; Ministers have had the most ample warning; yet when its first icy gust blew in the windows of the Cabinet room last February, it found Ministers playing tiddleywinks.

These are hard words. But politics is the art of the possible and he who would condemn a group of politicians for their misuse of power must first convince himself that a more effective grouping was possible.

notes · 
Fred Shapiro indicates that this usage "alerted lexicographers to figurative usage” of the word, tiddlywinks.
collection · 
photocopy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2415
published in · 
The Economist
date · 
27 December 1980
title · 
Marching Past Georgia
citation · 
page 13
collection · 
excerpt (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2416
published in · 
The Economist
date · 
10 December 1988
title · 
By the squidging of their thumbs….
citation · 
whole 7580 • page 45 • column 2
summary

Preventing multiple voting in Ghana.

content

Ghana's local elections on December 6th involved a lot of ink. Voters queued outside polling stations in village post offices and schools to have their hands marked with indelible violet crosses that would betray them if they tried to vote again. They then had to squidge their thumbs into dark blue pads and press them on the ballot papers.

notability rating · 
not tiddlywinks game
tw-ref-ID · 
2417
published in · 
The Economist
date · 
4 March 1989
title · 
A gap in the learning market
subtitle · 
Britain’s only private university has lessons for its state-financed competitors
citation · 
volume 310 • whole 7592 • page 57 • column 2
summary

About the University of Buckingham

content

Earnest study. With such a concentrated study programme, there is little time for partying, student politics, or tiddlywinks societies.

collection · 
photocopy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2418
published in · 
The Economist
date · 
27 February 1993
title · 
The royal game
by · 
David Manasian
citation · 
volume 326 • whole 7800 • page 96
summary

Concerning the game of court tennis

content

Do not, however, assume a contest on a physical par with tiddlywinks: real tennis (meaning “royal”, rather than “genuine”, and also known as court tennis) is the finest racquet sport of all.

collection · 
digital copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2419
Journal of Educational Sociology (journal)
associated with · 
American Sociological Association
tw-pub-ID · 
595

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Journal of Educational Sociology.
published in · 
Journal of Educational Sociology
date · 
October 1933
title · 
A Discussion of Criteria or Standards of Educational Value with Special Reference to Woodworking
by · 
Fred Strickler
citation · 
volume 7 • issue 2 • page 121
content source · 
www.jstor.org/stable/2961684
content

When I begin to think of boys and girls I begin to think of their eager pursuit of some activity because of its special appeal and their special interest in doing some particular phase of it. They must choose, they must identify themselves with the activity whole-heartedly or they would better be playing “tiddledy-winks” or thinking about nothing in particular.

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2420
Journal of English and Germanic Philology (journal)
publisher · 
University of Illinois Press
tw-pub-ID · 
577

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Journal of English and Germanic Philology.
published in · 
Journal of English and Germanic Philology
date · 
October 1953
title · 
Elements of Criticial Theory by Wayne Shumaker
by · 
W. K. Wimsatt, Jr.
citation · 
volume 52 • issue 4 • page 587 • column 1
content source · 
www.jstor.org/stable/27713615
content

do not believe Mr. Shumaker has written his book with the conscious aim of destroying literary criticism. But it would be difficult to conceive a way better calculated to reduce criticism to one of the most conspicuously futile forms of tiddlywinks in the range of civilized activities.

Yale University

W. K. Wimsatt, Jr.

notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2395
The English Illustrated Magazine (magazine)
publisher · 
The Central Publishing Company
location · 
358, Strand, W. C., London, London, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
596

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for The English Illustrated Magazine.
published in · 
The English Illustrated Magazine
date · 
May 1908
title · 
A Scientific Game
by · 
Agnes Hood
citation · 
volume 39 • whole 62 • page 155
content

The lady speaks: “Oh, yes, I’m devoted to whist; I know you men think we poor women can’t play a bit, but really you’re quite wrong. I’ve been told I play a very pretty game. It is so nice and intellectual, isn’t it? It makes one think. No, I don’t care for most games, they are such waster of time, don’t you think so? A friend of mine spends hours, positively hours, over Tiddleywinks. I often say to her, my dear Mary, how can you? I call it really wicked to waste one’s time so.

notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2421
The English Journal (journal)
tw-pub-ID · 
597

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for The English Journal.
published in · 
The English Journal
date · 
March 1919
title · 
Protecting the Theme-Reader
by · 
Homer A. Watt
citation · 
volume 8 • issue 3 • page 170 • column 1
content

The principal charge against Freshman English is that it is uninspiring. It does not engage the teacher’s mind sufficiently nor pay back in intellectual stimulation the efforts expended upon it. To descend from several years of graduate study of the best literature in the world to extensive and intensive reading of what the Atlantic Clubber calls the worst literature in the world is like a descent from chess to tiddledywinks.

notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2422
Entertainment Weekly (magazine)
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
598

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Entertainment Weekly.
published in · 
Entertainment Weekly
date · 
16 June 1995
title · 
Head Over Heels
citation · 
issue 279 • page 58(2)
summary

Mention in sound recording reviews

tw-ref-ID · 
2423
Esquire (magazine)
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
599

Toggle showing 3 tiddlywinks references for Esquire.
published in · 
Esquire
date · 
September 1949
title · 
Love and Tiddlywinks
by · 
Martin Gardner
citation · 
volume 31 • issue 3 • whole 190 • page 76 to 77
content

So the first word I called out was ‘Tiddlywinks.’

collection · 
original (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2424
published in · 
Esquire
date · 
February 1984
column title · 
American Beat
title · 
For Members Only
by · 
Bob Greene
citation · 
page 12
summary

Includes a section about Larry Kahn

collection · 
original (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2425
published in · 
Esquire
date · 
29 January 2007
column title · 
The Screen
title · 
And the Leni Riefenstahl ward for Rabid Nationalism Goes to…
by · 
Tom Carson
citation · 
edition online
content

Spielberg turns him back into Sergeant York, and his feats make the real one’s look like tiddlywinks.

tw-ref-ID · 
2426
Ethnology (journal)
tw-pub-ID · 
600

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Ethnology.
published in · 
Ethnology
date · 
April 1962
title · 
Child training and game involvement
by · 
J. M. Roberts & Brian Sutton-Smith
citation · 
volume 1 • issue 2 • page 177 • column 1
content

TABLE 7

Number of Games Differentiating Between the Sexes at p = .05 or Better

Game Classes—Pure Physical Skill

Nonsignificant—Quoits (1)

Favoring Girls— Hopscotch, Jump Rope, Jacks, Tiddleywinks (4)

Favoring Boys—Bowling, Horseshoes, Racing, Tug of War, Darts, Shuffleboard, Bows & Arrows, Throwing Snowballs, Shooting (9)

notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2427
Everybody's (magazine)
location · 
UK
tw-pub-ID · 
601

Toggle showing 4 tiddlywinks references for Everybody's.
published in · 
Everybody's
date · 
April 1906
title · 
The Gathering of the Churches
subtitle · 
Graft in the Wage System
by · 
Eugene Wood
citation · 
volume 14 • issue 4 • page 466 • column 1
content

“Open and honorable competition!” What do our “moral teachers” think the scuffle for a living is? A game of tiddledywinks?

notes · 
Publication name is: Everybody's Magazine.
tw-ref-ID · 
2428
published in · 
Everybody's
date · 
March 1912
title · 
Otherwhere
by · 
Leon Rutledge Whipple
citation · 
volume 26 • issue 3 • page 527 • column 2
content

The lambs bounced away on springs, “baa-baa-ing” plaintively. [...]

“They hop like tiddledywinks on green felt,” she called to John, laughing against the fence.

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2429
published in · 
Everybody's
date · 
3 May 1958
title · 
Well and True Tiddled
by · 
Russell Gordon
citation · 
page 14 to 15
notes · 
Includes an illustration.
collection · 
original (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2430
published in · 
Everybody's
date · 
17 May 1958
by · 
Peter Downes
summary

Tiddlywinks query by Peter Downes

notes · 
Mentioned in an edition of Winking World.
tw-ref-ID · 
2431
Fab (magazine)
location · 
UK
tw-pub-ID · 
602

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Fab.
published in · 
Fab
date · 
1965
summary

Mention in an article about musician Spencer Davis.

content

Graduate in German, Spencer Davis, likes best to sleep and eat—but not both at once. As a group, the Spencer Davis mob are keen tiddlywinkers and carry their sets around with them. Drummer Pete York, 6 ft. 3 in. tall, is known as Tiddler and is great with the winks. They seem to have started quite a trend and got the Manfreds and Animals interested too. So if you see the boys hopping around on the floor, don't disturb them. A match point might be at stake.

notes · 
Mentioned in Winking World 8, page 16.
notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2432
Fabrics Fancy Goods and Notions
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
603

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Fabrics Fancy Goods and Notions.
published in · 
Fabrics Fancy Goods and Notions
date · 
October 1905
title · 
Dolls and Toys
citation · 
volume 39 • issue 10 • page 32 • column 2
content

The Tiddledy Winks Ring game is another attractive game of Tiddledy Winks. At one end of the bottom of the box there is a circle in which are set fourteen pins, each one inside a smaller circle and numbered from one to fourteen. The implements consist of two Tiddledys and four Ring Winks, which are snapped from a felt disc. The game is played very much on the order of quoits, the object being to ring the pins counting the highest numbers, and it requires considerable skill to do this. The game sells for $2.00 a dozen, and each one is supplied with full instructions as to how it is played.

notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2433
Famous Jersey Cattle (magazine)
Serial Historical Magazine
tw-pub-ID · 
604

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Famous Jersey Cattle.
published in · 
Famous Jersey Cattle
date · 
November 1922
title · 
Tiddledywink’s Majesty King 181784, AJCC
by · 
Cedar Run Farm (Phoenixville, Pennsylvania)
citation · 
volume 1 • section Advertising section • issue 1 • page 14 and others • column 1
content

We placed Tiddledywink's Majesty King in service with the conviction that through his use “Cedar Run” would to a degree step ino the shoes of White Horse Farmes, now being dispersed after thirteen years’ intelligent and effective breeding by its late owner.

notability rating · 
not tiddlywinks game
tw-ref-ID · 
2434
Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction (magazine)
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
643

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction.
published in · 
Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction
date · 
August 1955
collection · 
photocopy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2521
Focus (magazine)
tw-pub-ID · 
605

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Focus.
published in · 
Focus
date · 
August? 1999
content

NASA should hire tiddlywink players to be astronauts

tw-ref-ID · 
2435
Forbes (magazine)
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
606

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Forbes.
published in · 
Forbes
date · 
10 December 2007
title · 
You Don't Know Tiddly
by · 
Dick Teresi
citation · 
section Forbes Life section
content

In the bare-knuckle world of competitive tiddlywinks, squops, gromps and Bristols are all fair play.

When Dave Lockwood sidled up to the pad to face Larry “King” Kahn in the penultimate round of the championship series, the tension in the room was so palpable one could cut it with a dull squidger–not that anyone in this crowd, which included four former world champions, would be in possession of a dull squidger.

Lockwood, trailing Kahn in the overall competition by three points and needing a decisive win to pull ahead, launched an all-out attack. We’re not talking about a nancy-boy, Indianapolis Colts, Peyton Manning attack, but rather a 1985 Chicago Bears attack, both safeties and every linebacker on a blitz, to hell with the consequences.

It started to work, too. Lockwood commandeered a huge pile of winks, but then Kahn, a former world champion, executed a masterly Bristol, and the 2007 North American Singles Tiddlywinks title was his. It is here that the responsible journalist should explain what a Bristol is, but let us put such technicalities aside for the moment in favor of a revelation:

Tiddlywinks is a sport, or so the winkers, playing here at the local high school in Ithaca, New York, kept telling me. It requires the foresight and strategy of chess, but, as one must shoot the winks to the desired location, the game takes a good bit of physical prowess as well. Former world champion Severin Drix called tiddlywinks a cross between chess and pool, an ideal mix of skill, strategy and luck. I would add “obsession.”

Created in 1888 by an English pub owner to amuse his patrons between brawls, tiddlywinks was a simple game in which a player pressed one disk, a squidger, down on the edge of another to force it to fly through the air and into a cup, a move called “potting.” For decades it remained a pastime primarily for children.

The game was transformed in 1955 at Cambridge University, where students instituted a set of rules more prolix than the Salt II accord. Tiddlywinks now takes place on a six-foot-long table covered with a mat, these days made of orthopedic foam, which provides lift and predictability when squidging a wink.

Tiddlywinks is normally a pairs game, with four colors of winks: blue, green, red and yellow. Each player gets six winks of the same color: four small winks of 16-millimeter diameter and two larger 22mm winks. Blue and red are partners, as are green and yellow (in singles, players take two colors). Play proceeds alphabetically (blue, green, red, yellow), with each player starting at a corner of the table. A small pot, 38mm high, with a 48mm opening at the top, sits in the center.

Scoring is what primarily separates the adult game from the child’s version. A player earns three points for each wink he has shot into the pot and one point for each wink that remains uncovered by an opponent’s wink. This means that tiddlywinks is mainly a defensive game.

At the Ithaca tournament, I tried my hand at potting. I barely missed my first attempt, then potted six straight winks from various distances and angles. I thought, aha, I finally have found my sport. That would be true if we were playing the old pub brand of tiddly. But in the Cambridge- improved version, potting isn’t everything. In fact, I witnessed many matches in which nary a wink ended up in the pot. As in golf, you pot for show, and “squop” for dough. If only there were some dough.

Covering, or squopping, your opponent’s wink, which takes it out of play, turns out generally to be a better strategy than going for the pot. The odds favor the player who controls the field of winks and plays for a low score over he who guns for three-pointers. Players vie to control ever-growing piles of winks by landing one of their colors on top. A single wink can theoretically squop any number of winks. Picture here not a neat stack, like a column of poker chips, but a “shingled” pile, a cascade of winks, each covering the one beneath like a fanned-out deck of cards.

At the national championships, I watched Ferd “the Bull” Wulkan take on Joe Sarnelle in an early round. Severin Drix served as my game-day commentator. Drix, a high school math teacher, and Wulkan, a labor organizer, both attended the Bronx High School of Science, graduating in 1964.

Drix explained that there are two American capitals of winking: Ithaca and Cambridge, Massachusetts. Wulkan went on to MIT, where he helped spark the Cambridge effort, while Drix attended Cornell and spearheaded the Ithaca winking machine. Since 1965, the bulk of American winkers have come from Cornell, MIT and Harvard.

Alas the game has never moved into the mainstream, as Drix was reminded a few years ago when he attempted to cross the Canadian border. Border guards asked what business Drix and his party had in Toronto. Drix replied, “We’re going to a tiddlywinks tournament.” The guards tore their cars apart.

Drix provided analysis as Wulkan and Sarnelle went at it. Early on Wulkan “nurdled” a wink. A nurdle is a wink that lands too close to the pot so it can’t be potted on a subsequent shot. It is an embarrassing but not fatal error. The game moved swiftly under a 20-minute clock, the players spending fewer than 30 seconds on each move. Wulkan took control quickly, squopping Sarnelle’s winks. At one point, one of Wulkan’s piles was threatened, so he executed a “gromp.” That is, he was able to squidge the entire pile so it moved to a more advantageous position en masse. Soon, Wulkan was taking three turns to Sarnelle’s one. When one player squops all his opponent’s winks of one color, the opponent cannot move those winks and loses that color’s turn. Start losing this kind of defensive battle, and you are trapped in an inexorable downward spiral. Offense cannot save you. The denouement came when Sarnelle potted one of his few un-squopped winks from a prodigious distance. It traced a long, lovely parabola in the air and clinked beautifully in the center of the pot. I thought, “Wow, three points.”

Drix said, “That’s Joe’s way of resigning.” What winks were not squopped were virtually unusable. His situation was “constipated,” in the parlance. Sarnelle had given up with a dramatic potting gesture. Wulkan won 6-1 under a scoring system that converts total points to “ordinals” in the color scheme and well, let’s just say that the crowd went wild.

Most of the matches I watched during the tournament were defensive struggles like this one, games that came down to squops, gromps and Bristols. Other maneuvers included the feeb, piddle, boondock, kumquat, megacrud, xylophone and the lunch. About which, the less known the better.

The big talk at the tournament, however, was about the impending “squidger shortage.” Winkers carry little tins full of different squidgers just as golfers carry a bag of clubs. Drix showed me his. He uses at least six, all within the allowable size of 1 to 2 inches in diameter: a medium-size potting squidger, a very thick one for long distance, a grainy disk for more friction, a large squidger that allows him to squidge more than one wink at a time, a special squopping squidger and a thin squidger for getting into dense piles. Drix said there is not much financial impetus driving manufacturers to devote a factory or two to squidger fabrication given that there are approximately 70 major-league winkers in North America. Many winkers make their own squidgers using a drill press or sometimes reshaping a poker chip on a lathe.

But, to paraphrase Lance Armstrong, it’s not about the squidger. I keep thinking about Larry Kahn’s Bristol against Dave Lockwood in the pivotal match. Let’s allow Lockwood to explain: “A Bristol, named for its invention at the University of Bristol in the UK, is a subset of gromps, which moves a pile of winks together to try to capture additional enemy winks. The two-wink Bristol shot in my game with Larry came after he blew up a pile, a few preliminary squops occurred, and then I squopped onto a pile with several of my winks. This is the one shot I regret, because I didn’t take the pile sufficiently far from Larry’s single squop. He was able to Bristol over and squop my wink. This pile eventually swallowed most of my winks, and what was a close game after the blowup turned into a solid win for Larry.”

The important thing is, nobody got hurt.

notability rating · 
important
tw-ref-ID · 
2436
Fortune (magazine)
location · 
New York, New York, USA
website · 
tw-pub-ID · 
213

Toggle showing 3 tiddlywinks references for Fortune.
published in · 
Fortune
date · 
22 October 1990
title · 
Do You Push Your People Too Hand?
by · 
Thomas A. Stewart
citation · 
edition online • volume 122 • issue 10 121(3)
content

Striking machinists drove Eastern Air Lines into bankruptcy when asked to tighten their belts once too often. Many workers simply burn out. (To avoid this, British Airways puts most employees through group training programs, which can include such surprising team-building activities as tiddlywinks, jigsaw puzzles, and Lego-building.)

collection · 
digital text (NATwA)
links · 
Fortune magazine – digitized text (free) (tw-ref-link-id 354)
tw-ref-ID · 
707
published in · 
Fortune
date · 
22 November 1993
title · 
Smart Marketing: The best ways to reach your buyers
subtitle · 
(The Tough New Customer)
by · 
Patricia Sellers
citation · 
volume 128 • issue 13 14(4)
content

With consumers choosing whether they will watch your ad, marketers will look beyond TV in search of captive audiences. Hence the growing popularity of sponsoring live events. No one watching the game can shut out your name if it's plastered on banners around a football stadium, racetrack, or even the Twinville Tiddlywinks Tourney.

notes · 
Autumn-Winter edition.
links · 
Fortune magazine – digitized text (free) (tw-ref-link-id 356)
tw-ref-ID · 
708
published in · 
Fortune
date · 
2 July 2015
title · 
Venture capitalist Reid Hoffman talks unicorns, valuations, and bitcoin
by · 
Leena Rao
citation · 
edition online
content

Q: Is the scale that Silicon Valley has achieved, with the massive amount of companies being built, good for the ecosystem overall?

Hoffman: Unequivocally yes. It’s not to say that there isn’t a bunch of noise, like an app launching for counting Tiddlywinks or something.

tw-ref-ID · 
709
Game Researchers' Notes (journal)
associated with · 
American Game Collectors Association
publication ID · 
ISSN 1050-6608
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
608

Toggle showing 20 tiddlywinks references for Game Researchers' Notes.
published in · 
Game Researchers' Notes
date · 
October 1966
by · 
Rick Tucker
citation · 
whole 24 • page front cover
summary

Illustration from Charles Zimmerling's tiddlywinks game patent.

collection · 
original (NATwA)
notability rating · 
important
tw-ref-ID · 
2455
published in · 
Game Researchers' Notes
date · 
October 1966
title · 
Tiddlywinks: The Classic Victorian Pastime: On Target for the 21st Century
by · 
Rick Tucker
citation · 
whole 24 • page 5552 to 5561
summary

Includes 6 photographs of antique sets.

collection · 
original (NATwA)
notability rating · 
important
tw-ref-ID · 
2456
published in · 
Game Researchers' Notes
date · 
October 1966
by · 
Rick Tucker
citation · 
whole 24 • page back cover
summary

Illustration of E. I. Horsman’s “Ring-A-Peg” tiddlywinks game

collection · 
original (NATwA)
notability rating · 
important
tw-ref-ID · 
2457
published in · 
Game Researchers' Notes
date · 
June 1988
title · 
Archives Information Listing
citation · 
whole 3 • page 5032 • column all
content

Type – Company – Game – Date – Contributor

Instr – E. I. Horsman – Tiddledy Winks – ca. 1890 – Lee & Rally Dennis

Instr – E. I. Horsman – Tiddledy Wink Tennis – 1890 – Lee & Rally Dennis

also Tidly Winks The New Round Game

Instr – McLoughlin Bros – Tiddledy Winks – 1890 – Lee & Rally Dennis

collection · 
photocopy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2438
published in · 
Game Researchers' Notes
date · 
June 1988
title · 
Archives Information Listing
citation · 
whole 3 • page 5034 • column all
content

Type – Company – Game – Date – Contributor

Instr — ? – Tiddledy Winks — ? – John Overall

collection · 
photocopy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2439
published in · 
Game Researchers' Notes
date · 
June 1988
citation · 
whole 3 • page 5042 • column all
summary

Reprint of ad for Horsman’s Tiddledywink Tennis

content

Tiddledy Winks Tennis © 1890 by E. I. Horsman; From the collection of Lee & Rally Dennis

collection · 
photocopy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2440
published in · 
Game Researchers' Notes
date · 
December 1989
column title · 
Games Wanted
citation · 
whole 6 • page 5103 • column 1
content

Chuck Hoey is looking for early Lawn Tennis (pre-1900) & all racket games. In particular Geo. S. Parker […] Tiddledy Winks Tennis […], E. I. Horsman […] Tiddledy Winks Tennis

collection · 
original (NATwA)
notability rating · 
minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2441
published in · 
Game Researchers' Notes
date · 
December 1989
column title · 
Game Catalog Responses
citation · 
whole 6 • page 5104 • column 1
content

All Fair, Inc. – 1928 Blinky Blinx (#411)

collection · 
original (NATwA)
notability rating · 
minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2442
published in · 
Game Researchers' Notes
date · 
August 1992
title · 
Robinson Crusoe’s Farmyard and The Wide, Wide World; How a Card Game led to the publication of a Victorian Best-seller
citation · 
whole 12 • page 7
content

It was a far better game than “Tiddle-de-Winks’”.

collection · 
original (NATwA)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2443
published in · 
Game Researchers' Notes
date · 
August 1992
citation · 
whole 12 • page 17
summary

“Four Moons Tiddledy Winks” listed for Selchow & Righter for 1865 (sic; year around 30 years too early)

collection · 
original (NATwA)
notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2444
published in · 
Game Researchers' Notes
date · 
June 1993
title · 
Jaymar is Game for 70th Anniversary
by · 
Bruce Whitehill
citation · 
whole 14 • page 5321
content

Donald Duck’s Tiddley Winx

collection · 
original (NATwA)
notability rating · 
minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2445
published in · 
Game Researchers' Notes
date · 
June 1993
citation · 
whole 14 • page 5323
content

Chuch Hoey is looking for […] M.B.’s Tiddeldy Wink Tennis” (sic)

collection · 
original (NATwA)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2446
published in · 
Game Researchers' Notes
date · 
June 1994
title · 
The Leo Hart Company and Playtime House: Rochester Printer and Puzzle Maker
by · 
Anne D. Williams
citation · 
whole 17 • page 5374, 5377 • column 2 (page 5374); all (page 5377)
content

As of January 1, 1945, the Hart Company adopted the name of Playtime House for a subsidiary specializing in puzzles, games, activity sets (paper dolls, sewing cards, stencils, etc.), and cloth books for infants. Most of the games were old standbys like bingo, lotto, anagrams, tiddly winks, checkers, Chinese checkers, Old Maid, and Pin the Tail on the Donkey.

These are some of the Playtime House products that are being featured by the leading retailers of America. [...]

GAMES [...]

Tiddly Winks

This 1946 advertisement shows the Playtime House logo.
collection · 
original (NATwA)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2447
published in · 
Game Researchers' Notes
date · 
February 1995
title · 
Comics and Cartoons Board Games
by · 
Alex G. Malloy
citation · 
whole 19 • page 5421
content

Disney did well getting their games into the marketplace. In the 1930s Whitman produced various Disney games including […] Disney Tiddley Winks

collection · 
original (NATwA)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2448
published in · 
Game Researchers' Notes
date · 
June 1995
column title · 
News
title · 
AGCA Mid-West Regional Meeting
citation · 
whole 20 • page 5467
content

a display of early games from the Midland County Historical Society, which included […] Tiddly Wink games;

collection · 
original (NATwA)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2449
published in · 
Game Researchers' Notes
date · 
February 1996
title · 
The Lilly Library Archives
by · 
Jim van Fleet
citation · 
whole 22 • page 5505
summary

Mentions the antique set “Over the Garden Wall” by E. I. Horsman, in the Lilly Library collection

collection · 
original (NATwA)
notability rating · 
important
tw-ref-ID · 
2450
published in · 
Game Researchers' Notes
date · 
February 1996
title · 
The Lilly Library Archives
by · 
Jim van Fleet
citation · 
whole 22 • page 5506
summary

2 black & white photos of “Over the Garden Wall”

collection · 
original (NATwA)
notability rating · 
important
tw-ref-ID · 
2451
published in · 
Game Researchers' Notes
date · 
February 1996
title · 
Keeping in Touch
by · 
Robert Finn
citation · 
whole 22 • page 5513
summary

Refers to Rick Tucker’s tiddlywinks web site on the Internet

collection · 
original (NATwA)
notability rating · 
minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2452
published in · 
Game Researchers' Notes
date · 
February 1996
citation · 
whole 22 • page 5516
summary

Black & white reproduction of Rick Tucker’s tiddlywinks home page on the Internet

collection · 
original (NATwA)
notability rating · 
minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2453
published in · 
Game Researchers' Notes
date · 
February 1996
title · 
An Important Antique Toy & Game Auction
citation · 
whole 22 • page 5522
summary

Cites McLoughlin Bros.’ “Combination Tiddley (sic) Winks”

collection · 
original (NATwA)
notability rating · 
minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2454
Game Times (newsletter)
associated with · 
American Game Collectors Association
publication ID · 
ISSN 1050-6594
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
609

Toggle showing 13 tiddlywinks references for Game Times.
published in · 
Game Times
date · 
April 1966
title · 
Subject: RE: Monopoly on the cereal box……
by · 
Rick Tucker
citation · 
volume 12 • issue 1 • whole 29 • page 630
summary

Includes Rick Tucker's email excerpt re Trix cereal tiddlywinks

collection · 
original (NATwA)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2470
published in · 
Game Times
date · 
Spring 1985
title · 
Games People Played—and Still Do!
citation · 
volume 1 • issue 1 • whole 1 • page 5
content

Many more games from the late 1800s and early 1900s are still with us. TIDDLY WINKS, also spelled TIDDLEDY, can be found before the turn of the century with instructions as to how to “tiddle the wink”, the tiddle being the larger disk which was snapped against the wink, or smaller disk.

collection · 
original (NATwA)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2458
published in · 
Game Times
date · 
Spring 1985
title · 
Game Trivia
citation · 
volume 1 • issue 1 • whole 1 • page 5
content

1. What does it mean to “tiddle your wink”?

collection · 
original (NATwA)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2459
published in · 
Game Times
date · 
Spring 1985
title · 
Common Games
citation · 
volume 1 • issue 1 • whole 1 • page 11
content

Generic Games […] TIDDLEDY WINKS

collection · 
original (NATwA)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2460
published in · 
Game Times
date · 
Late Summer 1985
title · 
Game Tally
citation · 
volume 1 • issue 2 • whole 2 • page 12
content

Chaffee & Selchow […] TIDDLEDY WINKS

collection · 
photocopy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2461
published in · 
Game Times
date · 
Summer 1987
column title · 
Featured Company
title · 
Transogram
citation · 
volume 3 • issue 2 • whole 7 • page 105
content

The 1930s also saw Transogram expand into the area of games. From the 1935 BIG BUSINESS to the 1938 GAME OF INDIA and TIDDLEDY WINKS, the company started featuring more colorful graphics and more interactive games.

collection · 
original (NATwA)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2462
published in · 
Game Times
date · 
August 1992
title · 
Fish... to Games... to Gardening
by · 
Anne Williams
citation · 
volume 8 • issue 2 • whole 18 • page 377
summary

Refers to the North American Tiddlywinks Association

collection · 
original (NATwA)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2463
published in · 
Game Times
date · 
April 1994
title · 
Tiddleywinks: Plain & Exotic
by · 
Rick Tucker
citation · 
volume 10 • issue 1 • whole 23 • page 504
collection · 
original (NATwA)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2464
published in · 
Game Times
date · 
August 1994
title · 
All-Fair Games, Cards, and Puzzles
by · 
Anne D. Williams
citation · 
volume 10 • issue 2 • whole 24 • page 517
summary

Refers to tiddlywinks in Fairchild’s 1958 catalog

collection · 
original (NATwA)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2465
published in · 
Game Times
date · 
August 1994
title · 
All-Fair Games, Cards, and Puzzles
by · 
Anne D. Williams
citation · 
volume 10 • issue 2 • whole 24 • page 519
summary

Reproduction of Alderman-Fairchild’s ad in Playthings
(1928) with Blinky Blinx Tiddledy Winks

collection · 
original (NATwA)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2466
published in · 
Game Times
date · 
December 1995
title · 
Subject: Aftermath
by · 
Rick Tucker
citation · 
volume 11 • issue 3 • whole 28 • page 602
summary

Rick Tucker’s email re Bloomington convention. of the American Game Collectors Association

collection · 
original (NATwA)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2467
published in · 
Game Times
date · 
December 1995
citation · 
volume 11 • issue 3 • whole 28 • page 607 and 608
summary

Photographs of Rick Tucker “as a tiddlywink” at the Bloomington convention

collection · 
original (NATwA)
notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2468
published in · 
Game Times
date · 
December 1995
title · 
Online
citation · 
volume 11 • issue 3 • whole 28 • page 613
summary

Refers to Rick Tucker's tiddlywinks web page.

collection · 
original (NATwA)
notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2469
Games (magazine)
tw-pub-ID · 
610

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Games.
published in · 
Games
date · 
February 1992
title · 
The Game and Puzzle Events Calendar
citation · 
page 54
summary

Tiddlywinks listing

collection · 
original (NATwA)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2471
Games and Puzzles (magazine)
location · 
UK
tw-pub-ID · 
611

Toggle showing 2 tiddlywinks references for Games and Puzzles.
published in · 
Games and Puzzles
date · 
November 1973
title · 
Tiddlywinks
by · 
Alan Dean
citation · 
whole 19 • page 7
notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2472
published in · 
Games and Puzzles
date · 
May 1974
title · 
Tiddly-winks (American style)
by · 
Philip M. Cohen
citation · 
whole 24 • page 22
summary

This is an early version of Philip M. Cohen's article on tiddlywinks terminology that later appeared in the journal, Verbatim.

tw-ref-ID · 
2473
Journal of Genetic Psychology
tw-pub-ID · 
613

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Journal of Genetic Psychology.
published in · 
Journal of Genetic Psychology
date · 
May 1960
title · 
A revised conception of masculine-feminine differences in play activities
by · 
B. G. Rosenberg & Brian Sutton-Smith
citation · 
volume 96 • page 168
content

Tiddle di winks

collection · 
transcript (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2476
Golf Illustrated (magazine)
location · 
UK
tw-pub-ID · 
614

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Golf Illustrated.
published in · 
Golf Illustrated
date · 
11 May 1900
column title · 
On the Ladies’ Links
title · 
A New Golf Game
citation · 
volume 4 • issue 48 • page 129 • column 2
content

“Golf Links” is the title of a new parlour game invented by Major Barter. Without being so ambitious and complicated as some of the variations on Golf which we have seen, it appears to be full of interest and to resemble the game closely enough to justify its title. The board, which is of a handy size for a morning room table, represents a short course, and in the centre is placed a circular box divided into compartments of different values. From the green felt-covered corners of the board the players flick their counters into the box on the “tiddly wink” principle. A small leaden sphere, flattened at the bottom, represents the actual ball and is placed in the position on the board which the number scored by the player entitles it to. The course abounds in hazards which entail the regular golfing penalties. “Golf Links” should provide a fund of amusement for winter evenings and wet days. It can be obtained at the Army and Navy Stores for 3s. 9d.

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2477
Golfers Magazine (magazine)
location · 
US
tw-pub-ID · 
615

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Golfers Magazine.
published in · 
Golfers Magazine
date · 
January 1922
citation · 
page 40
content

You Can Do Everything You Do on a Regular Golf Course with Holland’s Indoor Golf Game

The Most Fascinating Indoor Game Invented in Years

You “hook em,” “slice em,” “dub em” but practice will make you a perfect player.[…]

Illustration of the golf game board>

collection · 
digitized copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2478
GQ (magazine)
alternate name · 
Gentlemen's Quarterly
location · 
US
tw-pub-ID · 
616

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for GQ.
published in · 
GQ
date · 
December 1992
title · 
Tom Cruise From the Neck Up
citation · 
page 186 • column 2
collection · 
original (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2479
Harper's Bazar (magazine)
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
618

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Harper's Bazar.
published in · 
Harper's Bazar
date · 
March 1910
column title · 
New Games
citation · 
page 196 • column 4
content

There is a new tiddledy-winks game, with spring-boards from which to snap the chips and numbered openings.

collection · 
transcript (NATwA)
notability rating · 
minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2483
Harper's New Monthly Magazine (magazine)
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
617

Toggle showing 3 tiddlywinks references for Harper's New Monthly Magazine.
published in · 
Harper's New Monthly Magazine
date · 
January 1891
column title · 
London Music Halls
by · 
F. Anstey
citation · 
volume 82 • whole 498 • page 198 • column 1
content

No, she won’t, old Tiddlywinks!’ says the boy, rising suddenly from his hiding-place

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2480
published in · 
Harper's New Monthly Magazine
date · 
December 1891
column title · 
Literary Notes
citation · 
volume 84 • whole 499 • page 3 • column 2
content

He had not been fed on caramels, he had never been taught to drum on the piano in country hotels, and he had never played Tiddledy Winks.

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2481
published in · 
Harper's New Monthly Magazine
date · 
January 1893
title · 
The Old Way to Dixie
by · 
Julian Ralph
citation · 
volume 86 • whole 512 • page 170 • column 2
content

There was a desk and a student-lamp in the great cabin, and, alas for the unities! on the desk lay a pad of telegraph blanks—“the mark of the beast.” But they evidently were only a bit of accidental drift from wide-awake St. Louis, and not intended for the passengers, because the clerk came out of his office, swept them into a drawer, and invited me to join him in a game of tiddledywinks. He added to the calm pleasures of the game by telling of a Kentucky girl eleven feet high, who stood at one end of a very wide table and shot the disks into the cup from both sides of the table without changing her position. I judged from his remarks that she was simply a tall girl who played well at tiddledywinks.

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2482
Hobbies (magazine)
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
619

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Hobbies.
published in · 
Hobbies
date · 
April 1979
title · 
Tiddlywinks Games
by · 
Fred Shapiro
citation · 
page 161 • column 3
collection · 
photocopy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2484
The Illustrated American (magazine)
publisher · 
The Illustrated American Publishing Co.
location · 
Bible House, New York, New York, USA
Notes

Also at 142 Dearborn Street, Chicago, Illinois USA

tw-pub-ID · 
620

Toggle showing 2 tiddlywinks references for The Illustrated American.
published in · 
The Illustrated American
date · 
23 May 1891
column title · 
Current Comment
citation · 
volume 7 • issue 66 • page 3 to 4 • column 2 (page 3), 1 (page 4)
content

DOORATCHKY.”—There is no simpler game of cards than the Russian “dooratchky,” which may be freely translated as “tiddly-winks.” It was introduced into the fashionable world of St. Petersburg by Miss Goolak Artemovskaya, whose personal charms were so great that half the young dandies in the capital were soon engaged in playing "dooratchky " at her table. As she cheated them, the government sent her to Siberia.

One of her admirers had become so passionately devoted to "dooratchky" that he followed Miss Goolak Artemov-skaya into exile at Irkutsk, where lie married her. Here they met the good Bishop Benjamin, an excellent prelate with a weakness for card-playing. They had little difficulty in teaching him " dooratchky " ; and the bishop, falling in love with the game, persuaded the government to allow the late Miss, now Mrs. Goolak Artemovskaya to open a house at Irkutsk for the playing of "dooratchky." She cheated the youth of Irkutsk as she had cheated the youth of St. Petersburg, and her husband finally abandoned her, vowing that he would never play a game of "dooratchky" again.

Then came to Irkutsk the daughter of a Moscow merchant, who bore a striking resemblance to Mrs. Goolak Artemovskaya, not only in her physical charms but also in her love for "dooratchky." Under the spell of that fascinating game she and Goolak Artemovskaya became bosom friends, and not long afterward she was found lying dead by a river-bank, and Goolak Artemovskaya disappeared with her passports. The police, however, were too quick for that disciple of "dooratchky "; they brought her back to be tried for murder at Irkutsk, and the game of "dooratchky " is under a cloud throughout the Russian dominions.

notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2485
published in · 
The Illustrated American
date · 
1 August 1891
column title · 
Correspondence
citation · 
volume 7 • issue 76 • page 523 • column 1
content

If you find it quite impossible to provide for dancers, try progressive games. Have as many tables as you like, and arrange a different game at every table. At one, jackstraws; at another, jack-stones; for the third, bagatelle; for the fourth, checkers; and so on till the last table, where euchre is played. Lotto parties are very nice sometimes, and for just the kind of entertainment you wish, tiddleywinks is played.

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2486
The Illustrated London News & Sketch (magazine)
location · 
London, London, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
621

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for The Illustrated London News & Sketch.
published in · 
The Illustrated London News & Sketch
date · 
1970
citation · 
volume 257 • issue 1
content

a favorite during student rags recently became so popular that the English Tiddlywinks Association published a set of international rules.

Pundits will argue hours over two competing strategies. The “Pot-Squop” school plump for one player in a tiddley pair to pot his winks while the other delays the opposition team by “squopping” (covering) their winks with his own.

The ”Double-Squop” school prefers both players of the pair to cover their opponents’ winks before going for the pot.

tw-ref-ID · 
2487
Illustrated World (magazine)
tw-pub-ID · 
622

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Illustrated World.
published in · 
Illustrated World
date · 
December 1917
title · 
Toys Made from Odds and Ends
by · 
Jane Nesbitt
citation · 
volume 28 • issue 4 • page 582 and 620
content

Illustration at top of a fort with open windows, to be used as targets in the game of tiddlywinks.

An appropriate war game may be made after the fashion of “Tiddley-winks”. The front elevation of a fort is drawn in pencil on a piece of stout cardboard and colored with paints or crayons. Windows are cut out,and the whole is made to stand upright by the addition of two or three triangular supports.

Each player in turn places his small counters (generally six) anywhere in front of the fortress. He is now the attacking party, and his object is to shoot his counters through the different windows. If he succeeds in sending a counter through the window, then he “kills” a certain number of the “enemy”. The winner is the player who “kills” the greatest number in a given time. Any shot missing the fort entirely, going over, or missing at the sides, is a wasted shot, and counts one figure off the player’s score.

notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2488
The Independent (magazine)
publisher · 
Independent Corporation
location · 
130 Fulton Street, New York, New York, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
623

Toggle showing 2 tiddlywinks references for The Independent.
published in · 
The Independent
date · 
7 January 1904
title · 
An Excursion in Higher Criticism
by · 
Frank Crane, D.D.
citation · 
volume 56 • page 495
content

A RECENT ministerial meeting discussed the question as to the ethical bearings of the game called tiddledy-winks. Becoming interested in this matter I have been at some pains to investigate it thoroughly, and now, with considerable misgivings offer the results of my research to te public. While presenting the following views with a deep sense of humility and deeply conscious of possible errors in judgment, yet it seems to me that the eminent authorities quoted should have considerable weight.

Note, first, the nature of the issue. The question is not whether the game of tiddledy is harmful to the young, nor the game of winks, but tiddledy-winks, a compound expression, embodying two ideas in one. Each part of the given subject should therefore be separately examined, and the mutual interactive influences of each upon the other carefully gauged.

Taking up the first seed-thought, tiddledy, we may as well dismiss at once the theory (Meyer, Olshaufen Katzenellenbogen, Schnupfenannehmen) that this has any reference to one T. D. Winks, a prominent controversialist of Amsterdam in the sixteenth century. [...]

The ripest scholarship has decided that tiddledy has really a composite origin. [...]

notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2489
published in · 
The Independent
date · 
20 September 1919
title · 
Pebbles
subtitle · 
Personal
citation · 
volume 99 • whole 3693 • page 379 • column 3
content

From the Personal column of the London Times:

PERSONAL:

Would like to play Tiddlywinks.—Sweetheart.

notes · 
Early use of the spelling, “tiddlywinks”.
notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2490
Instructor (magazine)
publisher · 
F. A. Owen Publishing Company
tw-pub-ID · 
624

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Instructor.
published in · 
Instructor
date · 
1979
citation · 
volume 89
content

[...] David Lockwood. Flipping little disks into a cup may be acceptable for five-year-olds, but for tournament players, it’s the “squop” shotv[...]

tw-ref-ID · 
2491
The International Bookseller (magazine)
tw-pub-ID · 
625

Toggle showing 2 tiddlywinks references for The International Bookseller.
published in · 
The International Bookseller
date · 
26 March 1892
citation · 
volume 1 • issue 1 • page 6 • column 2
content

De Witt Publishing House […]The same house has just issued a new book by John Kendrick Bangs, author of “Tiddledy-wink Tales,” which proved to be the best child’s book of the year. The new volume is called The Tiddledywink’s Poetry Book,” and is a large quarto with full-page illustrations by Charles Howard Johnson. The text is printed in a colored border, and the cover alone will recommend it to the heart of every child.

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2492
published in · 
The International Bookseller
date · 
1 October 1892
citation · 
volume 1 • issue 27 • page 459 • column 1
content

The De Witt Publishing House (R. H. Russell & Son, proprieters), announce a number of most attractive juveniles [...] . “In Camp with a Tin Soldier,” by John Kendrick Bangs, is a sequel to the delightful “Tiddledywink Tales,” and recounts the further adventures of that engaging little lad, Jimmieboy; it is charmingly illustrated by E. M. Ashe, and can be had separately or in a box with “Tiddledywink Tales.” Mr. Bangs has also prepared a large picture book with humorous verses called “The Tiddledy-wink’s Poetry Book,” illustrated by Charles Howard Johnson. This book will be as popular with the children as the Brownie books were. Large quarto, with illuminated covers, 30 full-page illustrations, and colored borders to text. Bound in boards.

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2493
Jouets et Jeux de France (magazine)
location · 
France
tw-pub-ID · 
627

Toggle showing 2 tiddlywinks references for Jouets et Jeux de France.
published in · 
Jouets et Jeux de France
date · 
1953
title · 
Puces
citation · 
volume 3rd edition • page 304
summary

Listing of 8 French tiddlywinks manufacturers

collection · 
photocopy (NATwA); original (Pascal Pontremoli)
notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2495
published in · 
Jouets et Jeux de France
date · 
1956
title · 
Puces
citation · 
volume 5th edition • page 266
summary

Listing of 12 French tiddlywinks manufacturers

collection · 
photocopy (NATwA); original (Pascal Pontremoli)
notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2496
The Judge (magazine)
location · 
New York, New York, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
629

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for The Judge.
published in · 
The Judge
date · 
1921
citation · 
volume 81 • page 31
content

Page 31, illustration at right: Mr. Monk—Take my advice—quit golf and stick to tiddledy-winks! Page 31 (heading): When It Took Courage to Keep StillBy Minnie Leona Upton […]

tw-ref-ID · 
2499
Journal of Jurisprudence and Scottish Law Magazine (journal)
location · 
Scotland, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
628

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Journal of Jurisprudence and Scottish Law Magazine.
published in · 
Journal of Jurisprudence and Scottish Law Magazine
date · 
November 1890
column title · 
This Month
citation · 
volume 34 • issue 407 • page 609 to 610
content

Tiddley-Winks.—There is a report of a case in the Australian Law Times which involved the question whether the word “tiddley-wink” is libellous. A Chief Justice and two puisne judges deliberated upon this delicate matter, and decided in the negative. An “expert in slang” was called as a witness at the trial, who defined “tiddley-winking” to mean “using little dodges to obtain his own ends.” The jury declined to find this libellous, and the Court refused to disturb their decision. It is clear that the “expert in slang” did not know what he was talking about. Tiddley-winks, as most people know, is a game played with counters on a table, the object being to jerk the counters into a small cup in the centre of the table. To call a man a tiddley-wink, therefore, is no more libellous than to call him a lawn-tennis racquet.

tw-ref-ID · 
2498
Kindergarten Review (magazine)
publisher · 
Milton Bradley Co.
location · 
Springfield, Massachusetts, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
630

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Kindergarten Review.
published in · 
Kindergarten Review
date · 
April 1909
title · 
Happy Farmers
by · 
Camilla Kendall
citation · 
volume 19 • page 505 • column 1
content

Kenneth, whose father is a draughtsman and skillful with a knife, brought a most perfectly made windmill for the barnyard, and Edwin furnished a “Tiddledy Winks” cup for a watering trough.

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2500
Ladies’ Home Journal (magazine)
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
631

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Ladies’ Home Journal.
published in · 
Ladies’ Home Journal
date · 
June 1991
title · 
Playing Together
citation · 
page 82 and later
summary

Family recreation for the summer months.

tw-ref-ID · 
2501
League of American Wheelmen Bulletin and Good Roads (magazine)
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
632

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for League of American Wheelmen Bulletin and Good Roads.
published in · 
League of American Wheelmen Bulletin and Good Roads
date · 
19 April 1895
title · 
Spokes from the Felloes
citation · 
volume 21 • issue 16 • page 30
content

The senior editor and his associate will be the guest of the Woodbridge Club on Wednesday evening of this week, and we believe that no other gentlemen will be present. The two knights of the pen are not very strong at whist, and for their special entertainment a program has been arranged, which will allow them to revel in the delights of jackstraws and tiddledywinks. We never could absorb ourselves in whist when a pretty girl was smiling at us from across the way, but tiddledy-winks is full of delightful opportunity, especially when the young lady wears an expression on her face that is most becoming.

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2502
Liberty Review
A Magazine of Politics, Economics, and Sociology
location · 
17, Johnson's Court, Fleet Street, E.C., London, London, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
634

Toggle showing 2 tiddlywinks references for Liberty Review.
published in · 
Liberty Review
date · 
January 1903
column title · 
To Those Whom It May Concern
citation · 
volume 13 • issue 1 • page 22
content

SPORTSMAN.—We thank you for sending us the catalogue of Messrs. John Jaques & Son, 102, Hatton Garden, E.C., giving particulars of the latest “Parlour Games.” These prove unmistakably that the march of intellect is becoming quicker every day we live. “Wibbly-Wob”; the new varieties of “Tiddledy-Winks”; “Snick-Kick”; “Blow Football”; “Ludo”; “Pliffkins”; “Bumble-Puppy”; “Curliwigs”; “Loto”; “Flitterkins”; “Shantu”; and the rest of these pastimes which we see, are described as “intellectual and exciting,” are a complete justification of State-supported schools and free libraries. We hold that, in view of these marvellous evidences of the blessings of popular education, the citizen who curses the upward tendency of the school-rate is a disgrace to the enlightened age in which he lives. It may or may not be true that Wellington declared that the Battle of Waterloo was won on the playing fields of Eton: of this be assured, all future British victories will be entirely due to either “Wibbly-Wob” or “Bumble-Puppy.” We have already seen, in South Africa, what an intimate knowledge of the rules of “Ping-Pong” can do for the British Army; and the way in which General Buller crossed and recrossed the Tugela till he did not know which side he was on, or whether he was in the middle, demonstrated conclusively that “Tiddledy-Winks” is an indispensable adjunct to the study of military manœvres.

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2504
published in · 
Liberty Review
date · 
April 1918
title · 
The Housewife’s Glee
by · 
Carolyn Wells
citation · 
volume 43 • page 240
content

Here are some records, old, I know

But they’ll like any song;

And these nice games must surely go —

Tiddledy-winks, ping-pong.

notes · 
Reprinted from Life magazine.
collection · 
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2505
Library Journal (magazine)
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
633

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Library Journal.
published in · 
Library Journal
date · 
15 April 1978
title · 
Books or tiddlywinks?
by · 
Lillie Struble
citation · 
volume 103 • issue 8 • page 790 • column 3
content

Wouldn't librarians do better to be excellent librarians instead of running kindergartens, craft shops, and clubhouses? What has happened to the traditional concept of the librarian as a lover of books able to guide people to the recorded wisdom of the past? Have we sold our precious heritage in exchange for frivolity and a game of tiddlywinks?

collection · 
photocopy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2503
Life
location · 
19 West 31st Street, New York, New York, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
635

Toggle showing 2 tiddlywinks references for Life.
published in · 
Life
date · 
1 October 1896
title · 
At Tiddly-winks-by-the-Sea
citation · 
volume 28 • whole 718 • page 245 • column 1
content

THE season at Tiddly-Winks had not been over-successful. The genial proprietor of Tiddly-Winks Inn had enforced the regulation against Hebrews strenuously, but the Christian element had not responded as he had expected. As a result he had intimated to his clerks, towards the end of the summer, that if any of the chosen people who looked profitable appeared, they should not be scrutinized too closely.

Mr. Dreistein, who is well-known in the cloak line, happened down the coast, and hearing of the quarantine at Tiddly-Winks was seized with the characteristic longing of his race to evade it. Greatly to his suprise he was not informed after he had registered that the house was full. For a day or two he strutted the piazzas, in his full panoply of diamonds and gold-rimmed pince-nez. But his proud secret burned within him. Finally he sat down at the end of the piazza, in a vacant chair, next a dwarfed and hump-backed gentleman who was looking at the sea-scape. Dreistein ventured a remark about the weather which received a courteous reply. Finally, Dreistein, bursting with pride, went further.

"My tear sir," he said, "can you keep a segret?"

"I fancy so," replied the deformed man.

"Veil, I must tell you a good choke. You know der rule in this hotel about Hebrews?''

"Yes."

"Veil, I vas a Jew myselluf." And a broad smile of conscious cleverness inundated Dreistein's curved beak and other features.

"Can you keep a secret ?" asked the other.

"Zertainly," replied Dreistein, "I can keep anything that comes my way."

"Well, said his new acquaintance, "don't you tell a soul on earth, but I'm a hump-back."

notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2506
published in · 
Life
date · 
29 November 1917
title · 
The Housewife’s Glee
by · 
Carolyn Wells
citation · 
whole 1831 • page 863
content

A BOON the soldiers are to me.

With joy to them I send

Old magazines and books, you see,

And papers without end.

This “Care of Children ” I can spare,

And just as well as not

They can have that old Bible there—

That fine-print polyglot.

Then here is “Hints for Losing Weight”;

And now—just let me see—

Yes, I’ll send ” Bridge Rules Up-to-date “;

The date is ’93.

Oh, here’s a row of funny books.

Well, I won’t touch that shelf;

They’re full of stories, by their looks,

I’d like to read myself.

Here are some records, old, I know,

But they’ll like any song;

And these nice games must surely go—

Tiddledy-winks, ping-pong.

These playing-cards will make them glad!

They’re sticky, I’m afraid—

But in our club we’ve always had

Caramels while we played.

There! I’ve worked hard those boys to please.

You see, I hate to knit,

And so I send such things as these.

And feel I’ve done my bit!

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2507
Life (magazine)
location · 
New York, New York, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
211

Toggle showing 11 tiddlywinks references for Life.
published in · 
Life
date · 
5 December 1938
by · 
O. Schoenhut, Inc. (2001 E. Hagert Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)
citation · 
volume 5 • issue 23 • page 88 • column 3
content

TIDDLE TENNIS

Table tennis with tiddly winks, 50c

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
minor
tw-ref-ID · 
667
published in · 
Life
date · 
9 December 1940
title · 
Christmas Toys
subtitle · 
They Give Great Fun to Old and Young
citation · 
volume 9 • issue 24 • page 97 • column 3
content

But [F. A. O.] Schwarz still has a steady, satisfying demand for standbys like fluffy dolls, tiddlywink sets, express wagons.

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
675
published in · 
Life
date · 
27 December 1948
column title · 
Letters to the Editors
by · 
Mal Higgins (Cottage Grove, Oregon)
citation · 
volume 25 • issue 26 • page 2 • column 3
content

Sirs:

I admire your marvelous courage in doing "The Chicago Rackets" but aren't you risking a kick in the teeth or a slug in the belly?

You spoiled a beautfiful illusion with this writer by digging up the ghosts of Capone. I thought they had all turned to tiddlywinks.

But as long as they have evidently tucked away their heaters, are making their graft payments happily and are keeping Chicagoans and suburbanites biologically, economically and psychologically merry, why not let sleeping dogs keep their bones buried?

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
668
published in · 
Life
date · 
3 July 1950
title · 
What Will the Sergeant Think?
citation · 
volume 29 • issue 1 • page 24 • column 3
content

Fortunately none of the people in these pictures happened to die, but only because there was Someone watching over them who did not give one tiddlywink what anybody thought.

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
674
published in · 
Life
date · 
28 April 1952
title · 
Eisenhower of Abiliene
citation · 
volume 32 • issue 17 • page 117 • column 2
summary

About Dwight D. Eisenhower

content

At one time he threatened to get interested in life and won his "A" by being the most promising back in Eastern football—but the Tufts game broke his knee and the promise. Now Ike must content himself with tea, tiddledywinks and talk, at all of which he excels.

notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
669
published in · 
Life
date · 
unconfirmed 22 August 1960
summary

Ad or reference to a Harvard University tiddleywinks competition (unconfirmed)

tw-ref-ID · 
670
published in · 
Life
date · 
14 December 1962
title · 
In a tense game of tiddlywinks, Harvard is heartened by an odd Ivy cheer…
subtitle · 
…Hold that Squop!
citation · 
volume 53 • issue 24 • page 121 to 122 • column all
summary

Coverage of match between Harvard's Gargoyle Undergraduate Tiddlywinks Society (GUTS) and Brown University on 17 November 1962 at Phillips Brooks House in Harvard Yard, Cambridge, Massachusetts

content
Black and white photograph of four male winkers leaning over a table with a cup and winks on the mat.
Black and white photograph of six female cheerleaders with pom-poms cheering on the winkers below.

The touch that won a tiddle title

In the gathering gloom of a New England Saturday, the score lay deadlocked, 9 to 9. An underdog Brown team had held its own against the favored Harvards. The Crimson spectators stood silent, sensing an upset. Then a crucial Harvard play clicked. Harvard's defensive specialist tiddled a deft squop. Another Harvard scored on a long, soaring squidge. "Hold that squop," cheered the spectators. Wink snapped after wink, and now the Crimson onslaught could not be denied. Squopping and squidging with nimble-fingered accuracy, Harvard went on to win, 40 to 16, and left the table to the triumphal bleats of its band.

It was the climactic game of a tense athletic rivalry. So heartened was Harvard by its hands-down victory that it went on to beat its arch-rival Yale 32 to 10 the next week and emerged undefeated in national competition. The rivalry—which has occupied the earnest efforts of some 25 collegs this year and already generated a legend and language of its own—centers around an innocent parlor pastime of children turned diabolical in the hands or more-or-less grownups: tiddlywinks.

Intercollegiate tiddling infected America last fall when a team from Oxford came to the U.S. English students had been winking it up since 1955 and they felt like showing off in the colonies. The game they brought over complicated tiddlywinks' essentially simple challenge, which uses a large plastic disk to snap a smaller disk into a cup. They had grafted on to it a complexity worthy of a country which has produced such bizarre complications as cricket and English grammar. It embraced such concepts as "the squidge,", i.e., the basic winking shot, the shooting of a disk into the tiddlepot, or cup; and the "squop," a crucial defensive maneuver which immobilizes an opponent by landing your disk on top of his. The well-thumbed Oxonians defeated 25 U.S. teans in a row. Sniifed one, "The best tiddlywinks player in America appears to be only slightly better than the worst."

But Harvard was not put off by the arrogant Oxford tour. It formed its own varsity, practiced hard and scheduled not only some traditional Ivy League rivals but also Mt. Holyoke, Simmons and Wellesley. Soon the dexterous Harvards were making intercollegiate wink lore of their own. They perfected the crowd-pleasing "Carnovsky," named after Steve Carnovsky, varsity candidate who sank four table-length shots in a row during fall practice. (Weaker at short range, Carnovsky failed to make the team. Harvard was quick to put the finger on the idea of offensive and defensive specialists. It set up two-man units each with a powerful offensive squidger and a canny defensive squopper. Harvard's top scorer is John Kernochan, class of '64. His defensive partner, the Crimson Chinese bandit, it Thomas R. Houston, '64. Harvard's splendid 11 and 0 season has been encouraged by a traveling entourage of comely cheerleaders from nearby girls' colleges (previous page, bottom) whose repertoire has included such tiddilating exhortations as "Apply Game Theory!", "Use Effective Strategy! and the basic cheer, "Tiddle the Wink!"

Black and white photograph at top right of a male winker at left leaning down to shoot a wink, with many onlookers and fellow winkers behind him at to the right of the mat.
Before tense spectators at match, Stephen Goldberg (above) of Brown aims a "squidge" or "long bomb."
Black and white photograph at center right of a winker wearing glasses leaning down close to the match and holding his squidger near a large pile adjacent to the pot.
Right: Harvard Captain Parry tries delicate shot at Tiddlecup's rim.
Black and white photograph at bottom right of six Harvard winkers, each tensing one or more of their fingers for the camera.
Unvanquished in American competition, Harvard's proud varsity tiddlywinkers stand in college yard and display the deft hands and dour concentration that won them tiddle title.
collection · 
original copy (NATwA); digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
important
tw-ref-ID · 
671
published in · 
Life
date · 
11 January 1963
column title · 
Letters to the Editor
title · 
HOLD THAT SQUOP
by · 
Avrom I. Doft
citation · 
volume 54 • issue 2 • page 22 • column 3 to 4
content

Sirs:

Your article on Tiddlywinks (Dec. 14) brings back fond memories of four years ago when I was the Abbott of the Wink, the leader and founder of the Society for the Advancement of Tiddlywinks at the University of Pennsylvania (SATUP).

So your article is in error in stating that inter-collegiate tiddling first infected America last fall. SATUP was organized in 1958.

Oxford claimed the championship that year, but SATUP immediately challenged them and arrangements were made for a match to be held in the U.S. When Oxford failed to show, SATUP claimed the title.

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
672
published in · 
Life
date · 
9 October 1964
column title · 
Letters to the Editor
title · 
EDITORIAL: CUP RACES
by · 
N. W. Potter (Tacoma, Washington)
citation · 
page 29 • column 3
content

Sirs:

I wholeheartedly disagree with your editorial "Good Luck to Sovereign." With that line of reasoning we should have allowed the Russian track team (men) to defeat our team in L.A. and give the Communists Southeast Asia because the Communists have been trying so hard and so long for these goals. Thank goodness our forefathers did not have this belief. As for me, I want the U.S.A. on top, be it tiddlywinks, sailing or Vietnam.

tw-ref-ID · 
677
published in · 
Life
date · 
10 October 1969
column title · 
LIFE Comment
title · 
The Game That Blooms in Calmer Times
subtitle · 
Baseball: The Other Fabulous Invalid
by · 
Wilfred Sheed
citation · 
volume 67 • issue 15 • page regional (6 pages before 25) • column 3
content

The other main problem—that there is just too much baseball every summer—is less easy to fix. [...]

As to the argument from fashion, let us hear a word from Mahatma Dal Gosht, the rage of the East. "Your modern youth has taken a definite turn toward contemplation and inner peace. The unseemly hustle of his elders is not for him, oh no, For after-yoga relaxation—tiddlywinks, perhaps, or a quiet game of Mah-Jongg. But baseball is too fast." If you struck out too often in grade school, you'll believe it.

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
676
published in · 
Life
date · 
September 1988
citation · 
volume 11 • issue 11 • page 82(4)
content

Obsessed: says America's Cup sailor Dennis Cooper, 'Competition is life's blood, and I'm a vampire.'

tw-ref-ID · 
673
Light (magazine)
A Journal of Social Worcester and her neighbors
location · 
Worcester, Massachusetts, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
636

Toggle showing 5 tiddlywinks references for Light.
published in · 
Light
date · 
20 September 1890
citation · 
volume 2 • issue 30 • page 21 • column 3
content

Tiddledy Wink !

JUST OUT. The most enchanting and fascinating game for young or old in the market. All the rage in Boston and New York. Price, only 25c. For sale by

C. F. HANSOM & CO., 317 Main Street.

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2508
published in · 
Light
date · 
27 September 1890
title · 
With Reed and Lyre and Voice
citation · 
volume 2 • issue 31 • page 12 • column 2
content

It appears that Mr. Johnson is striking out in the right direction. His dramatic singing is prov- ing satisfactory in large measure, and it is pleasant to hear that fine voice in something beside the tiddledy-winks which the Ruggles Street Quartet has to sing frequently. He sang down the orchestra, with the brass a trille headstrong, very satisfactorily.

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2509
published in · 
Light
date · 
27 September 1890
citation · 
volume 2 • issue 31 • page 27 • column 2
content

Tiddledy Wink !

JUST OUT. The most enchanting and fascinating game for young or old in the market. All the rage in Boston and New York. Price, only 25c. For sale by

C. F. HANSOM & CO., 317 Main Street.

notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2510
published in · 
Light
date · 
4 October 1890
citation · 
volume 2 • issue 32 • page 3 • column 1, 2
content

Society must have its favorite game each season. Last winter Worcester played whist, whist, whist, nothing but whist. Occasionally a euchre party intervened, or an evening of “progressive hearts”—though, for that matter, “progressive hearts” was probably played (without the cards) at a good many of the other parties. Poker, too, is said to be becoming quite the game in a social way. But late advices, which the newspapers are fond of talking about, seem to indicate that progressive tiddledy-wink will be one of the great games this winter, if not the leader of all. A Worcester lady who played it with the people at Bar Harbor, this summer, tells Light thatit had an immense vogue there and that it is really “great fun.” Light has not yet played tiddledy-wink, but there is a fascination about the name, and a tiddledy-wink party seems to sound just as well as a progressive whist séance. At any rate, the world must have its pastimes, and this seems to be a harmless and pleasurable one

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2511
published in · 
Light
date · 
18 October 1890
column title · 
About Folks
citation · 
volume 2 • issue 34 • page 5 • column 3
content

Worcester has a citizen named Winks. He is not a relative of Tiddledy.

notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2512
Linn's Stamp News (newspaper)
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
637

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Linn's Stamp News.
published in · 
Linn's Stamp News
date · 
18 December 1978
title · 
Tiddlywinks Topical
by · 
Rick Tucker
citation · 
page 6
summary

Query by Rick Tucker.

collection · 
original (NATwA)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2513
The Literary World (Boston) (magazine)
A Fortnightly Review of Current Literature
publisher · 
E. H. Hames & Company
location · 
Boston, Massachusetts, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
639

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for The Literary World (Boston).
published in · 
The Literary World (Boston)
date · 
17 December 1892
title · 
Holiday Books
citation · 
volume 23 • issue 26 • page 480 • column 1, 2
content

L. Prang & Co. issue among their many pleasing Christmas publications […] two humourous pictures of four owls playing “Whist” and four cats engaged at “Tiddledy-Winks,” by Mrs. S. C. Winn […]

notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2515
The Literary World (London) (magazine)
publisher · 
James Clarke & Co.
location · 
13 & 14 Fleet Street, E.C., London, London, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
638

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for The Literary World (London).
published in · 
The Literary World (London)
date · 
13 May 1892
title · 
Nonsense and Fairy Stories
citation · 
volume 45 New Series • whole 1176 • page 457, 458
content

Tiddledywink Tales. By John Kendrick Bangs. Illustrated by Charles Howard Johnson. (Griffith, Farran, and Co. 2s. 6d.)

Although it is nonsense pure and simple, yet we venture to predict that Mr. Bangs's new book, Tiddledywink Tales, will be read and laughed over by a large number of grown-up readers, in addition to those for whom it was presumably intended. The story describes the adventures of an engaging little lad, Jimmieboy by name, in the land of the Tiddledywinks after he had been put to bed. Mr. Bangs is an American writer, which may render it necessary to explain to juvenile readers the meaning of some of the allusions made; but it is to be hoped that the book will not fall into the hands of young people with inquiring minds. Should it do so, parents will have a hard time in trying satisfactorily to explain the many absurdities in situation and dialogue. For instance, who would not rather have the following taken on trust than be compelled to explain the salient points in it to an infant terror?

The Techeelephant.

Just then there came to Jimmieboy's care the greatest din he had ever heard, and he noticed that the Red Tiddledywink looked very much frightened—in fact, he had turned pink with fear.

‘What is the matter?’ asked Jimmieboy. ‘Nuffin’s wrong I hope.’

‘No,’ returned the Red Tiddledywinks, ‘but we wamt to get out of this as quickly as we can, because the Techeelephant is coming, and if he sees me we won't get away for two hours, and then we shall be late for the Athletic Sports and the Blue Tiddledywink’s Ball.’ [...]

‘Oh, fank you,’ cried Jimmieboy, jumping down and running to the Tiddledywink’s side. ‘Tell him Blackey's Hoodoo verse,’ he whispered.

notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2514
M (magazine)
The Magazine for Civilized Men
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
641

Toggle showing 2 tiddlywinks references for M.
published in · 
M
date · 
May 1989
citation · 
page cover
collection · 
original (NATwA, Dave Lockwood)
tw-ref-ID · 
2517
published in · 
M
date · 
May 1989
title · 
Civilized Fun
subtitle · 
Child's Play at Oxford
citation · 
page 4 to 6
summary

Article about the Cambridge University Tiddlywinks Society, with 5 black-and-white photographs.

collection · 
original (NATwA, Dave Lockwood)
notability rating · 
important
tw-ref-ID · 
2518
Mad (magazine)
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
642

Toggle showing 2 tiddlywinks references for Mad.
published in · 
Mad
title · 
Tiddleywinks Finals
by · 
Severin (artist)
summary

In Wide World of Sports

tw-ref-ID · 
2520
published in · 
Mad
date · 
September 1970
title · 
Makeus Sickby M.D.
citation · 
whole 137 • page 43 to 48
tw-ref-ID · 
2519
Management Today (magazine)
tw-pub-ID · 
644

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Management Today.
published in · 
Management Today
date · 
January 1992
title · 
Power, Pride and Prejudice
citation · 
page 5
summary

About women in management

tw-ref-ID · 
2522
Marketing News (magazine)
location · 
Illinois, Chicago, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
10

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Marketing News.
published in · 
Marketing News
date · 
13 August 1994
title · 
Consumers go POG wild; marketers milk latest craze
by · 
Tim Triplett
citation · 
volume 28 • page 1
content

POGs? Flat marbles. Round trading cards. New Age tiddlywinks.

keywords

pogs

collection · 
digital copy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
42
Maxim (magazine)
tw-pub-ID · 
645

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Maxim.
published in · 
Maxim
date · 
May 2000
title · 
The Best of British
citation · 
whole 62 • page 62
summary

Mention of Alan Dean’s World Singles win.

tw-ref-ID · 
2523
McClure's Magazine (magazine)
publisher · 
The McClure Publications, Inc.
location · 
New York and London, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
646

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for McClure's Magazine.
published in · 
McClure's Magazine
date · 
February 1918
title · 
Leaks and Letters
citation · 
volume 51 • issue 4 • page 46 • column 3
content

PERHAPS you will remember the time when we came very near having a smart brush with one of the big powers over a small, yet meaningful incident that occurred about a Latin American country. We took our stand on the Monroe doctrine and told the Big Power to go chase itself. Whether or not the B. P. woidd pay any attention to our warning was another matter. Things looked very tense and exciting for a while. A lot of the jingo papers began calling for support of the President, no matter whether he declared war or not, and urging him to go the limit, in the defense of our dignity. Various legations hummed with activity and our state department worked all night and every night. The navy was put in lighting order — oh. we gave every sign of pulling up our shirt sleeves and getting ready to give somebody a good licking. Cables hummed and the Cabinet met every day in long strenuous sessions. <Pour-parlers were tossed back and forth between our country and the Big Power like tiddledy winks and the war cloud got blacker and blacker and more menacing with every second.

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2524
Mind and Body (journal)
A Monthly Journal Devoted to Physical Education
publisher · 
Western Photo-Engraving Company
location · 
St. Louis, Missouri, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
647

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Mind and Body.
published in · 
Mind and Body
date · 
June 1899
title · 
The Developmental Influences of Play
by · 
James Herbert McKee, M.D.
citation · 
volume 6 • issue 64 • page 77 • column 1
content

Boys delight in the use of tools during this period and in building all sorts of things ; making little streams and dams, paddle-wheels and boats, simple machinery of all kinds. Many games are now played — “duck-on-the-rock,” “black man,” “crokinole,” “leap-frog,”—simple feats of all kinds, turning somersaults, rolling over backward, marbles, “mumble-the-peg,” “prisoner’s base,” “puss in the corner,” ” tiddledy winks,” “touch wood.”

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2525
Missions (magazine)
An International Baptist magazine
location · 
Ford Building, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
648

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Missions.
published in · 
Missions
date · 
January 1917
title · 
Wants for Some One to Fill
citation · 
volume 8 • issue 1 • page 48 • column 1
content

The following is a list of game Miss Carpenter would like very much to have for use in her clubs for boys and girls. […] Brevet, Wonder Garden, Chuck a Luck, Wonderland Zoo, Parcheesi, Puff Billiards, Wall Toss, Funny Face Game, Parlor Croquet, Halma, Ping Pong, Picture Lotto, Jack Straws, Putting Tail on Donkey, King Ring, Hopla, TIddledy Winks, Croquet

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2526
Modern Language Notes (journal)
publisher · 
Johns Hopkins University Press
tw-pub-ID · 
576

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Modern Language Notes.
published in · 
Modern Language Notes
date · 
December 1945
title · 
Anglo-French Etymologies
by · 
Leo Spitzer
citation · 
volume 60 • issue 8 • page 514 • column 1
content source · 
www.jstor.org/stable/2910470
content

In view of the French names of children's games which are derived from the pirouette tiddlywinks ‘a game in which one tries to throw small disks into a small cup’ with the medieval pilliwinks. The NED s. v. tiddlywink lists the following meanings:

[... to be retrieved]

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2394
The Monthly Magazine (magazine)
Or, British Register
publisher · 
Sherwood, Gilbert, and Piper
location · 
London, London, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
650

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for The Monthly Magazine.
published in · 
The Monthly Magazine
date · 
December 1840
title · 
The Knave and the Deuce
subtitle · 
A Horrible Story
by · 
Sir Ephialtes Mooncalf, Knight-Mayor
citation · 
volume 4 • issue 24 • page 571 • column 1
content

He cared not for ghosts, but he’d watched like a lynx

For the deuce when the dice he would rattle,

And then the bad spirits he’d met with, methinks,

At the low country taverns they call tiddleywinks,

Might have used him to that sort of cattle.

notability rating · 
pub
tw-ref-ID · 
2529
Mosher's Magazine (magazine)
Official organ of the Catholic Summer School and Home Study and Reading Circle
publisher · 
The Mosher Publishing Co.
location · 
New York, New York, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
651

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Mosher's Magazine.
published in · 
Mosher's Magazine
date · 
April 1902
column title · 
Book Reviews
citation · 
volume 20 • issue 1 • page 135 • column 1
content

From Benziger Brothers comes a goodly number of the excellent short stories for youth, which they publish in good form and, as a rule, with excellent discrimination. [...] Bunt And Bill, by Clara Mulholland, opens with an exciting account of a game at tiddledy-winks, and has a masked lady in it.

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2530
MPLS-St. Paul Magazine (magazine)
location · 
Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
649

Toggle showing 2 tiddlywinks references for MPLS-St. Paul Magazine.
published in · 
MPLS-St. Paul Magazine
date · 
April 1995
title · 
Fifty-two weekend getaways
citation · 
volume 23 • issue 4 • page 34(22)
summary

In the Upper Midwest region

tw-ref-ID · 
2527
published in · 
MPLS-St. Paul Magazine
date · 
August 1995
title · 
Bingo! Five rows, five columns of good clean fun
citation · 
volume 23 • issue 8 • page 52(2)
tw-ref-ID · 
2528
Proceedings, National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (journal)
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
652

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Proceedings, National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America.
published in · 
Proceedings, National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
date · 
26 October 1999
title · 
Vocal imitation in zebra finches is inversely related to model abundance
by · 
Ofer Tchernichovski, Thierry Lints, Partha P. Mitra, and Fernando Nottebohm
citation · 
volume 96 • issue 27 • page 12901 to 12904
content

Song Tutoring Apparatus

Each bird was kept singly in a soundproof box (50 × 30 × 27 cm3) throughout the experiment. The box contained two keys, 1 inch above each of two perches. Keys were prepared from 2-g lever switches (Cherry Elect E22–85HX; Wallingford, CT). We glued a red, ½-inch round, plastic tiddlywinks piece to the end of the lever and, above this, attached a small piece of cuttlebone. By pecking either of the keys, the bird could induce song playbacks from a 11/4-inch samarium cobalt speaker (Intervox S125RL; Washington, DC) hidden inside a plastic model of an adult zebra finch male (6). Birds had free access to the keys and to the plastic male model throughout the experiment. All birds started pecking the key within 2–5 days of being placed in the training cage, at a posthatching age of 32–37 days. Key pecking persisted throughout the experiment.

notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2531
National Magazine (magazine)
An Illustrated American Monthly
publisher · 
“The National” Press; W. W. Potter Co.
location · 
41 West First Street, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
653

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for National Magazine.
published in · 
National Magazine
date · 
October 1902
title · 
PING PONG
subtitle · 
The Greatest of In-Door Games
by · 
Henry Essex
citation · 
volume 17 • issue 1 • page 127
content

This winter Ping-Pong will doubtless reach the greatest point of popularity that a game has ever attained.In the last twenty years there have been three great furores in games. These were Tiddledy Winks, flippant and foolish but still fascinating; Pillow Dex, the immensely popular game played with inflated Pillow Dex ballons, (which are struct to and fro across a dividing line) and Ping-Pong:—

And the greatest of these is Ping-Pong.

It is a notable and significant fact that all three of these games are games in which the element of physical skill enters. It is also a notable fact that all three of them are purely of English derivation, although the American game publishing house of Parker Brothers is responsible for the last two furores, and is the sole maker of both Ping-Pong and Pillow Dex in the United States.

Mp>Of these three game Tiddledy Winks is entirely devoid of generalship or mental skill. Pillow Dex has use for a certain degree of intelligence, while Ping-Pong, on the other hand, possesses large opportunities for ability and strategy. The English people are very fond of games in which physical skill is employed. They are, in fact, also very fond of mental board games requiring strategy, although no good strategical board game has come out from England, while the United States has produced, in recent years, the great games of skill—Go Bang, Halma and Chivalry. [...]

notability rating · 
ridicule
tw-ref-ID · 
2532
Neuropsychologia (journal)
publisher · 
Elsevier Ltd.
tw-pub-ID · 
654

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Neuropsychologia.
published in · 
Neuropsychologia
date · 
7 February 2009
title · 
Pointing to two imaginary targets at the same time: Bimanual allocentric andegocentric localization in visual form agnosic D.F
by · 
David P. Carey, H. Chris Dijkerman, A. David Milner
citation · 
volume 47 • page 1469
content

In the later experiments, we showed that requiring a sensorimotor response is not in itself sufficient to allow for near-normal localization in pointing. D.F. made aiming movements directly to coloured tokens (“tiddlywinks”) on a fixed workspace containing 3–5 elements

notability rating · 
minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2533
New England Monthly (magazine)
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
655

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for New England Monthly.
published in · 
New England Monthly
date · 
October 1986
title · 
Caution: Geniuses at Work and Play
summary

About MIT; mentions tiddlywinks

notes · 
Reprinted in Reader's Digest, October 1987.
tw-ref-ID · 
2534
New Era (magazine)
The official monthly magazine for youth of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
656

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for New Era.
published in · 
New Era
date · 
March 1978
title · 
Oh, Tiddledywinks
by · 
Nancy Hinsdale Wilcox
citation · 
page 48
content

The players are in their appointed places, eyes ahead and breath held. Every muscle is tensed, every nerve ending ready for the signal that will mean the start of a long-awaited, precision competition.

“Ready?” the referee barks. The competitors nod silently. “Okay then. Ready, set … tiddledy!”

Tiddledy?

Yes, tiddledy. At the command the first contestant expertly flips a plastic disk toward a small, round container in the center of the table, having used eye, hand, and mind in the effort. Success! There is a faint plastic plop as the disk settles into the cup.

“Darn!” The opponent says to himself. “I’ll really have to squidge the wink into the tub carefully this time.”

Squidge? Wink? Tub? What is this, anyway?

This, in case you have not already guessed, is that game you probably discarded years ago with your dolls or toy trucks. If you didn’t, you better get it out of your little brother’s toy box or the attic; the tiddledywink revival is on its way.

Although there was no tiddling team in the Olympics, the game—or sport, as enthusiasts prefer to call it—has enjoyed popularity on college campuses for years. Many universities sponsor an annual tournament (probably in conjunction with their frog-jumping and frisbee-throwing contests) to pit top tiddlers against each other. In fact, one year the Harvard team hosted an international meet, only to be out-winked by the Oxford flippers 25–0. This did not inhibit them, however, and they went on to capture all of the Ivy League titles for that year.

The sport is ideal for parties, activities, and socials. Almost everyone can participate, whether it is as a competitor, scorekeeper, referee, or cheerleader (“T-I-D, D-L-E, Tiddle-that-wink!”). Rounds can move fast enough for a fairly large group to play and a tournament champion can emerge in fairly short order. However, for the more intense, six-hour winkathons have been known to occur.

Interested? It is easy to learn, and a few minutes of tiddling will probably bring it all back to you. So dig out that dilapidated box and prepare yourself to become an expert.

Perhaps the pieces have been scattered or lost over the years, so it might be a good idea to take inventory. Official rules list equipment as follows: (1) at least 15 small disks in assorted colors, 7/8 inch in diameter and 0.057 inch thick (but don’t get out the measuring tape—most assembled games are regulation size); (2) a cup, 1 1/2 inches in diameter and 1 1/2 inches high; (3) a larger disk of unspecified size; and (4) felt launching pads, usually thick and square.

Rules can be simple or complex, but the basic move is the same no matter which method you choose. The cup is always placed two feet from the launching pads, and the player presses the edge of the large disk against a smaller one, causing it to flip into the air—hopefully to land in the cup.

In tournaments there are men’s and women’s singles and doubles, and it is quite easy to mix the teams. In singles, each player flips 15 winks; in doubles, each team flips a total of 25, with at least ten apiece.

There are basically three types of scoring. The first, similar to golf, gives each player the total number of tries it takes to flip all disks into the cup. The player with the lowest score wins.

The second method is the kind you’ll most likely find explained in your childhood set. Often, a plastic mat will be included, with the cup as the bull’s-eye and concentric circles of lower scores as the wink lands farther away from the cup. In this case, each disk is flipped only once.

The second method may be combined with the third or the third may be used alone for the more experienced player. It also consists of one flip per wink and scores as follows:

10 points if it lands and stays in the cup

5 points if it lands in and then bounces outside the cup

3 points if it grazes the cup in the air

1 point if it grazes the cup on a bounce from the table.

Any of these methods can be adapted to suit your particular winkers’ wants.

Now that you know the basics, here are a few terms to help you hoodwink your opponent into thinking you are an old pro, even if you haven’t squidged a disk in years.

PLOP: another word for the landing of the wink. “That was just a lucky plop”

SHOOTER: the largest disk

SQUIDGE: another word for shooting, in which the largest tiddledy (“squidger”) sends the wink flying

TIDDLEDY: the large disk

TIDDLEPOT: the cup

TUB: another word for the cup

WINK: the smaller disks

There you have it. You are now ready to tackle the squidgers in another ward or Mutual class, or even in your own family. Organizing a competition should be easy, especially if the top tiddler receives a chocolate cake decorated with candy tiddlies. But even if you lose, what could be better than getting flipped a wink by that boy or girl you’ve had your eye on all year?

media description

Illustrated by Julie F. Young

notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2535
The New Leader (magazine)
tw-pub-ID · 
658

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for The New Leader.
published in · 
The New Leader
date · 
17 November 1986
title · 
Spain’s rocky straits
citation · 
volume 69 • page 6(3)
summary

Sovereignty issues over the Straits of Gibraltar

tw-ref-ID · 
2537
New Monthly Magazine and Humorist (magazine)
Edited by Theodore Hook, Esq.
publisher · 
Henry Colburn
location · 
13, Great Marlborough Street, London, London, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
659

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for New Monthly Magazine and Humorist.
published in · 
New Monthly Magazine and Humorist
date · 
1837
title · 
High Connexions
by · 
A. A. G.
citation · 
volume 50 • page 399 • column 1
content

There’s Lady Flash, the Earl of Trumps,

And old Sir Abel Addle.—

Lord Tidley Winks, and Viscount Frumps,

And Lady Fiddlefaddle;—

Some others I could mention, too,

And give you their directions:

Why, bless your soul, these are but few

Of all her high connexions.

links · 
New Monthly Magazine and Humorist (tw-ref-link-id 1727)
notability rating · 
not tiddlywinks game
tw-ref-ID · 
2538
New Republic (magazine)
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
661

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for New Republic.
published in · 
New Republic
date · 
30 April 1966
title · 
Indonesia for Indonesians
citation · 
page 11
summary

Figurative usage of tiddlywinks

content

But if the Army were careless, and Dr. Subandrio gained power again, he could make what has happened recently in Indonesia look like a game of tiddlywinks.

collection · 
transcript (NATwA)
notability rating · 
minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2539
New Scientist and Science Journal (magazine)
tw-pub-ID · 
459

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for New Scientist and Science Journal.
published in · 
New Scientist and Science Journal
date · 
1 April 1971
title · 
Counting Cosmic Rays
citation · 
page 36 • column 1
content

[Ian] Hepworth (whose main claim for fame is to have been tiddlywinks champion of Nottingham University), uses large sodium iodide and caesium iodide scintillation crystals to measure the rate and energy spectrum of cosmic ray stars by pulse shape discrimination.

tw-ref-ID · 
1906
New York (magazine)
location · 
New York, New York, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
664

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for New York.
published in · 
New York
date · 
31 March 1986
title · 
Design/Game Room
by · 
Marilyn Bethany
citation · 
page 64
media description

Photographs of an antiquet iddlywinks set.

collection · 
original (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2547
New York Review of Books (magazine)
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
660

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for New York Review of Books.
published in · 
New York Review of Books
date · 
25 January 1979
citation · 
page 2, 50
summary

Query by Fred Shapiro and Rick Tucker

collection · 
original (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2565
The New Yorker (magazine)
location · 
New York, New York, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
663

Toggle showing 17 tiddlywinks references for The New Yorker.
published in · 
The New Yorker
date · 
10 December 1927
citation · 
page 84 • column 3
content

* Holland's Indoor Golf Game—played with tiddledywinks on sporty nine-hole course. Really swell; $3.50.

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2550
published in · 
The New Yorker
date · 
7 December 1929
citation · 
page 132
content

[...] like the magnetic fish pond, Tiddledy- Winks, Diabolo, etc.

tw-ref-ID · 
2548
published in · 
The New Yorker
date · 
8 February 1930
title · 
Court Games
subtitle · 
Tiddlywinks vs. Squash Racquets—The Pros Agree—Coaches All
citation · 
page 80 • column 2
content

A FEW weeks ago Dr. Mixsell, on behalf of the squash committee of the Princeton Club, sent out cards on which members were asked to indicate whether they favored squash tennis or squash racquets. Everything was made as easy as possible for them; the cards were stamped, addressed, and little boxes for checking were provided so that one’s preference could be indicated with a minimum of effort. As a result quite a few people voted. Once the jokers who turned in ballots for ping-pong and tiddlywinks had been weeded out, the returns indicated a large majority for quash racquets—208 to 126, to be exact.

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2551
published in · 
The New Yorker
date · 
15 December 1934
citation · 
page 116
content

A feature is Tiddledy- Winks, in a stirring revival;

tw-ref-ID · 
2549
published in · 
The New Yorker
date · 
17 December 1938
citation · 
page 79 • column 1
content

The old toothpick-and-bottle trick of barroom fame pops up at Macy in an item called Pile ’Em High; this version adds the hazard of a swinging bottle that tips drunkenly just as you begin to think you are getting somewhere; twenty-three cents. At the same place: Tiddle-Tennis—like tiddlywinks except that you try to get your chips over a miniature tennis net instead of into a cup; a green felt pad is marked like a tennis court and you score as in the outdoor game; fourty-seven cents, and good…

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2552
published in · 
The New Yorker
date · 
3 December 1949
citation · 
page 151
content

educational toys-plain pastimes, like Tiddledy \Vinks ($1.29), and games that

tw-ref-ID · 
2558
published in · 
The New Yorker
date · 
1950 s
title · 
(none)
by · 
Doris Matthews
content
Cartoon illustrating 5 golf players standing with golf club bags at a driving range. At right, a man is wearing a sign placard stating “NO WAITING—TIDDLYWINKS PRACTICE RANGE”. No caption.
collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2557
published in · 
The New Yorker
date · 
13 October 1951
citation · 
page 32 • column 2
content

“Like any three-year-old, he’s temperamental,” Richens said. “He thinks he’s a pretty tough guy.” “Believe me, I am really tough,” Elektro said, seeming to perk up. “I am so tough I shave with a blowtorch and I play tiddlywinks with manhole covers.”

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2553
published in · 
The New Yorker
date · 
15 December 1962
column title · 
The Sporting Scene
title · 
Just a Personal Thing
citation · 
page 156 • column 3
content

plus a series of wholly unofficial matches not sponsored by the universities—two Rugby games against Amherst teams, touch games between the Harvard Krokodiloes and the Yale Whiffenpoofs, ad between the Harvard Crimson and the Yale Record (the announced score of this game, by tradition, is always 23–2 in favor of the home team), and even a Harvard-Yale “varsity” tiddlywinks game.

collection · 
transcript (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2554
published in · 
The New Yorker
date · 
21 November 1963
column title · 
The Sporting Scene
title · 
Just a Personal Thing
citation · 
page 151
content

ornamental, grape-colored stacked-tiddledywink-and-tassel trim is $249.

tw-ref-ID · 
2559
published in · 
The New Yorker
date · 
4 April 1964
column title · 
A Reporter at Large
title · 
Wake up and live
citation · 
page 146
summary

Figurative usage.

content

Sun Citians […] take little interest in the organized activities, describing them as ‘make-work’ or ‘tiddlywinks’

collection · 
transcript (NATwA)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2560
published in · 
The New Yorker
date · 
24 October 1964
title · 
Why advanced winkers prefer to do their tiddly-winking on a Montina Vinyl Corlon Floor
citation · 
page 249 • column all
content

As is always the case with intense and serious games of this nature, experts emerge who find ways to make the games more difficult than they already are.

Which is why advanced winkers play on a Montina Corlon floor.

Montina Corlon, through the design and cunning of its manufacturer, has an extraordinary, nubbly surface textures.

squopping of winks a matter subject to hazard and chance. Even the most perfectly balanced wink, tiddly-winked with utmost precision, case be caused to waver and falter on Montina's charmingly uneven surface.

The heat of combat is apt to render the players unaware of Montina's beauty. [...]

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2555
published in · 
The New Yorker
date · 
20 September 1982
citation · 
page 7
content

club and Eddie Condon’ , just a tiddledy- wink’s hop east, demarcate a

tw-ref-ID · 
2561
published in · 
The New Yorker
date · 
11 October 1982
title · 
Jimmy Ryan's
citation · 
page 8 • column 1
content

154 W. 54th St. (664-9700)—This club and Eddie Condon's, just a tiddlywink’s hop east, demarcate a little slice of what West 52nd Street—now labelled Swing Street for tourists but known in earlier times to the initiated as simply The Street—was like thirty, forty, and more yeats ago, when it was swing and bebop world headquarters and rows of town houses housed jazz clubs.

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2556
published in · 
The New Yorker
date · 
7 July 1986
citation · 
page 57
content

I appeared: “Si McCarthy. Tiddledy- winks.” -MARY MCCARTHY

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2562
published in · 
The New Yorker
date · 
16 December 1991
citation · 
page 15
content

including the still familiar Tiddledy Winks and Pillow-Dex (Parker

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2563
published in · 
The New Yorker
date · 
7 December 1992
citation · 
page 48
content

a champ at it. Russian bank, tiddledy- winks. No wonder George runs

tw-ref-ID · 
2564
Newsweek (magazine)
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
662

Toggle showing 7 tiddlywinks references for Newsweek.
published in · 
Newsweek
date · 
23 June 1958
title · 
Britain
subtitle · 
One Was Not Prim
citation · 
page 43
summary

Mention of Oxford playing Cambridge at tiddlywinks.

content

Ancient Oxonians [...] might weep or wonder about such antics of today's Oxford students as these:

A tiddlywinks contest with Cambridge University (won 113 to 111 by the Oxford tiddlers).

collection · 
transcript (NATwA)
notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2540
published in · 
Newsweek
date · 
3 March 1969
title · 
Man inside the spacesuit
citation · 
page 57
summary

Quote from astronaut Gordon Cooper

content

"They ought to hire tiddlywinks players as astronauts," Cooper snorted.

collection · 
transcript (NATwA)
notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2541
published in · 
Newsweek
date · 
10 November 1980
title · 
Grim Lessons of the Long Crisis
citation · 
page 60 • column 3
summary

Figurative usage in the context of President Jimmy Carter's Iran rescue mission.

content

Secretly, Carter was considering giving the Pentagon the green light. for a military operation. “The White House was playing tiddlywinks with the State Department”, says one Carter aide.

collection · 
photocopy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2542
published in · 
Newsweek
date · 
16 March 1981
title · 
The Fastest Man On the Inside Track
citation · 
page 101 • column 2
content

“I've always had this killer instinct,” he [Eamonn Coghlan] says over a giant bowl of cornflakes, “whether it was tiddlywinks or cross-country, I had to win”

collection · 
photocopy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2543
published in · 
Newsweek
date · 
4 May 1981
title · 
Thurow Vs. Gilder: A Debate
citation · 
page 63 • column 3
content

To an extent, [Lester] Thurow said. [...] “This is one of those areas where George [Gilder] says you've got to have faith, but the problem with that is that we have only one economy to play tiddlywinks with.”

collection · 
photocopy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2544
published in · 
Newsweek
date · 
30 October 1989
title · 
Not Just Kid Stuff Anymore
subtitle · 
Corporate sponsorship for childhood games
citation · 
page 70
summary

Mentions NATwA.

collection · 
original (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2545
published in · 
Newsweek
date · 
6 October 2003
title · 
Bar Games: Seeing Eye to Eye
by · 
Brian Braiker
citation · 
edition online
content

So bored that they took an interest in staring contests.[…] NEWSWEEK lays claim to the burgeoning tiddlywinks movement.

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2546
The Nineteenth Century and After (journal)
A Monthly Review
publisher · 
Spottiswoode & Co. Ltd., Printers
location · 
New Street Square, E. C., London, London, England, UK
Notes

James Knowles (Editor)

tw-pub-ID · 
665

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for The Nineteenth Century and After.
published in · 
The Nineteenth Century and After
date · 
March 1906
title · 
Football and Polo in China
by · 
Herbert A. Giles
citation · 
volume 59 • whole 359 • page 509
content

In one passage we are told how the great general Ho Ch’ü-ping, when campaigning in the north, and almost destitute of provisions for his troops, ‘hollowed out a place for them to play football in,’ whatever that may mean.In the Hsi ching tsa chi we read:

The Emperor, Ch’êng Ti, B.C. 32-6, was fond of football; but his officers represented to him that it was both physically exhausting and also unsuitable to the Imperial dignity. Hist Majesty replied: We like playing; and what one chooses to do is not exhausting. An appeal was then made to the Empress, who suggested the game of tiddlywinks for the Emperor’s amusement.
collection · 
photocopy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2566
North American Review (magazine)
associated with · 
University of Northern Iowa
location · 
Iowa, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
666

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for North American Review.
published in · 
North American Review
date · 
July 1891
title · 
The Relations of Literature to Society
by · 
Amelia E. Barr
citation · 
volume 153 • issue 416 • page 91
content

The true writer gives his whole intellect and his whole time to his work, and he is satisfied to do so. He has no time and no interest to spare for tiddledy-winks and donkey parties, nor even for progressive euchre.

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2567
Notes and Queries (magazine)
location · 
UK
tw-pub-ID · 
667

Toggle showing 7 tiddlywinks references for Notes and Queries.
published in · 
Notes and Queries
date · 
9 December 1871
citation · 
volume 4th Series viii • page 486 • column 2
summary

Query re “kidly wink”

content

“TOM AND JERRY” (4th S. viii, 362)—Beer-shops are in Craven very commonly known as “Tom and Jerry” or “Jerry shops”. The name (not related by the proprietors) is significative of the rows and disturbances that too often occur in some of those nests of infamy called “beer-shops.” In the West of England a beer-shop is known as a “kidly wink”—a term which is a puzzler to me.

VIATOR (1)

collection · 
photocopy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
pub
tw-ref-ID · 
2568
published in · 
Notes and Queries
date · 
6 January 1872
citation · 
volume 4th Series ix • page 19 • column 2
summary

Quote re “kiddle-a-wink” from Beeton’s Christmas Annual for 1863, page 39, note

content

KIDLY-WINK (4th S. viii. 486.)—This is surely the same as kiddle-a-wink—a word which advertisements and placards made sufficiently familiar to the public eye just before the appearance of Beeton's Christmas Annual for 1863. It was used as the general title of a collection of stories supposed to be told by some persons snowed up in a Cornish ale-house or kiddle-a-wink. The author of the tales, Francis Derrick, offers the following etymology:—

“In Cornwall, every ale-house licensed to sell beer only is called a kiddle-a-wink. The name is said to have arisen thus:—About thirty years ago, when I believe an Act of Parliament had just been passed establishing the new licence, some miners entered one of the first of the new-fashioned beer-houses and demanded some toddy. ‘I am not licensed to sell spirits,' answered the poor woman who kept the place, looking hard at the men ; “but I can boil the keddle (kettle) for é, and ef ye mind to wink when I pouar out tha hot waatur, maybe you'll find it’s draawed out of an uncommon good well.' The miners did as they were told, and as they stirred and drank the hot water, one of them said, “So the gran' folks up to Lunnun church-town that make tha laas cael this a beer-house, they do. Aw my dear, I should cael et a keddle-an’-wink. An ef thee stick to thic name, Un (Aunt) Tamson, thee'st do a pewer stem of trade; but ef thee kips to tha name they give et oop to Lunnun churchtown, thee waient fang (earn) much cobshans (savings) fer thee ould age. What do é say, soas (friends)? I reckon I'm right. Give me a drap more hot water out of the kiddle-a-wink, do é now, co’. (This last is a coaxing term generally added to every entreaty by the Cornish.) Thus, without the aid of parliament or of lexicon, a word was coined, that instantaneously and like a flash was conveyed throughout the county and adopted by every possessor of the new licence; and although beer-houses doubtless sell nothing but beer, they nevertheless remain kiddle-a-winks to this day.”—Beeton's Christmas Annual for 1863, p. 39, note.

St. SWITHIN

collection · 
photocopy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
pub
tw-ref-ID · 
2569
published in · 
Notes and Queries
date · 
6 July 1872
citation · 
volume 4th Series x • page 5 • column 1 and 2
summary

Song about Kidley Wink from a newspaper

content

“KIDLEY WINK.”

If the enclosed copy of verses, which I have recently met with amongst some other newspaper cuttings, is of any use to you as illustrative of the derivation of the common term of “Kidley Wink,” as applied to a beer-shop, it is at your service.

THOMAS HARPER.

Mercury Office, Cheltenham.

“Ye topers of England, attend to my song,
The moral is great and the matter not long;
It concerns those new shops for the vending of drink,
Which are, by most people, called Kidley Wink.
- Derry down, down, derry down!


“Now, this Kidley Wink is the name of a man,
Who in London resides, and is fond of a can ;
He advised this new method of turning the “chink,’
And therefore each shop is called Kidley Wink.


“The law was proposed, it could not have been better,
By the worthy X-Chancellor of the X-chequer,
And he made a long speech on the blessings of drink,
But he ne'er took his can in a new Kidley Wink.


“Now the consequence is, that everywhere
Tailors, hucksters, and all take to selling of beer;
They pawn their best coats, buy a barrel of drink,
Turn landlords, and set up a Kidley Wink.


“And the cobbler his pegging-awl drops to unloose
The peg—while the tailor, forsaking his goose,
Makes a goose of his friend, robs his purse, ’till the brink
Of ruin is found in a Kidley Wink.


“Then in country or town, wherever you gaze,
Strange signs of the times stare you full in the face:
Griffins grin in your teeth—Angels tempt you to drink
All your money away in a Kidley Wink.


“The Dog, Cow, and Horse are each pictured so pat,
That beholders, quite puzzled, ask “What sign is that?’
But to some men the Devil, I verily think,
Would be pleasing if hung o'er a Kidley Wink.


“Now, 'tis plain that those men, with their malting and brewing,
Do themselves little good, while the landlord they ruin;
For the profits of sale, and the strength of the drink,
Are together dispersed in each Kidley Wink.


“Then let each man in future keep to his own trade,
And depend on’t that all things will better be made;
For ’tis vain for our huckstering landlords to think
A fortune to make in a Kidley Wink.


“But 'tis avarice makes us forget we're all brothers,
And we seek our own gains on the ruin of others;
Then, ye lovers of justice and hearty good drink,
Pray for England's deliverance from Kidley Wink.
November, 1831.”
collection · 
photocopy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
pub
tw-ref-ID · 
2570
published in · 
Notes and Queries
date · 
6 April 1878
citation · 
volume 5th Series ix • page 264
summary

Slang “tiddlywink” via The Reader, 1864

content

Tiddlywink.—A “leaving” shop where money is lent on goods without a pawnbroker's licence (Northamptonshire).

from The Reader, 1864, an extinct literary journal.

collection · 
transcript (NATwA)
notability rating · 
pub
tw-ref-ID · 
2571
published in · 
Notes and Queries
date · 
18 January 1890
citation · 
volume 7th Series ix • page 48 • column 2
summary

Query re “kiddlewink”; first use of “tiddledywinks” in a sentence

content

KIDDLEWINK.—Can any of your correspondents inform me what is the derivation of the word “kiddlewink,” or “tiddledy winks”? A friend tells me in the Midland Counties it denotes a house where beer is sold without a licence. Lately a game has been introduced here bearing the name of “Tiddledywinks.” M. D.

Lamaha House, Georgetown, Demerara.

[“Tidlewink, a beer-shop.—West”—Halliwell.]

collection · 
photocopy (NATwA); digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
important
tw-ref-ID · 
2572
published in · 
Notes and Queries
date · 
1 February 1890
citation · 
volume 7th Series ix • page 96 • column 1
summary

Reply to query

content

KIDDLEWINK (7th S. ix. 48).—The source of this application of this term to a beer-shop may be seen in ‘N. & Q.’, 4th S. ix. 19, after Beeton's Annual, 1863, p. 39, note. In vol. x. p. 5 there is a copy of verses (November, 1831) in illustration of the story:—

It concerns those new shops for the vending of drink,
Which are, by most people, called kidley wink.

Vv. 3, 4.

ED.MARSHALL.

Kiddle-a-winks were houses (chiefly, I believe, in the West Country) where smuggled spirits were sold, and where the presence of a kettle and a knowing wink from the proprietor indicated that “right Nantz” or other contraband spirits might be obtained. Some years ago one of Beeton's annuals was entitled ‘Kiddleawink; or, Nine Balls One and All.’ JAMES HOOPER.

50, Mornington Road, N.W.

collection · 
photocopy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
pub
tw-ref-ID · 
2573
published in · 
Notes and Queries
date · 
19 October 1946
citation · 
page 158 • column 1
summary

“Squalloping” in list of words from the book Lorna Doone

content

Squallopping. lx: 68. (Of a toad.) The context indicates “splashing about.” ‘E.D.D.’ has Scolloping, “draggling,” Herefordshire only, and Scallops, “an awkward girl,” Northern. The Suppt. has Squallop, sb., Devon, “meaning unknown,” but obviously disparaging. ‘O.E.D.’ has Squalper, obs., rare, “to agitate, disorder.” “Squalloping” looks imitative, and for many such words it is impossible to specify a normal form.

collection · 
photocopy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
potentially interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2574
Official Gazette (official records)
associated with · 
United States Patent and Trademark Office
location · 
Washington, District of Columbia, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
669

Toggle showing 3 tiddlywinks references for Official Gazette.
published in · 
Official Gazette
date · 
15 November 1927
title · 
Alphabetical List of Registrants of Labels
citation · 
volume 364 • issue 3 • page vi • column 2
content

Zulu Toy Manufacturing Company, Inc., Battle Creek, Mich. Tiddledy Winks Croquet. For Tiddledy Winks Game. 33,011; Nov. 15

notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2576
published in · 
Official Gazette
date · 
15 November 1927
title · 
Alphabetical List of Registrants of Labels
citation · 
volume 364 • issue 3 • page xiv
content

Tiddledy Winks Croquet. For Tiddledy Winks Game. Zulu Toy Manufacturing Company. 33,011; Nov 15

notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2577
published in · 
Official Gazette
date · 
15 November 1927
title · 
Labels Registered
citation · 
volume 364 • issue 3 • page 567
content

Registered November 15, 1927. […]

33,011.—Title: Tiddledy Winks Croquet. For Tiddledy Winks Game. Zulu Toy Manufacturing Company, Inc., Battle Creek, Mich. Published February 1, 1927.

notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2578
L' Officiel des Jeux et Jouets (magazine)
name in English · 
The Official Games and Toys
location · 
France
tw-pub-ID · 
670

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for L' Officiel des Jeux et Jouets.
published in · 
L' Officiel des Jeux et Jouets
date · 
13 April 1950
title · 
Opinion Sovietique sur les Jouets 1950
title in English · 
Soviet Opinion on Toys 1950
citation · 
issue 13 • page 24
content

«L’inventeur, estime la Pravda, n’a pas encore mis au point un jeu de puces capables de communiquer le choléra. Mais cela viendra.»

collection · 
photocopy (NATwA); original (Pascal Pontremoli)
notability rating · 
potentially interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2579
Ohio State Law Journal (journal)
location · 
Ohio, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
668

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Ohio State Law Journal.
published in · 
Ohio State Law Journal
date · 
1992
title · 
Exculpatory Agreements for Volunteers in Youth Activities—The Alternative to “Nerf” Tiddlywinks
by · 
Joseph H. King, Jr.
citation · 
volume 53 • issue 3 • page 683
content

"Nerf®" tiddlywinks2 will become the guiding paradigm.

2 The metaphor of the "neriP" tiddlywinks comes from one of my former students, Patricia F.

Nicely.
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2575
Oklahoma Toastmaster (magazine)
location · 
Oklahoma, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
240

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Oklahoma Toastmaster.
published in · 
Oklahoma Toastmaster
date · 
April-May 1972
citation · 
page 4
tw-ref-ID · 
852
Oregon Voter (magazine)
Weekly Magazine of Citizenship
publisher · 
C. C. Chapman (editor)
location · 
Worcester Building, Portland, Oregon, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
671

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Oregon Voter.
published in · 
Oregon Voter
date · 
30 March 1918
title · 
Can You Beat It?
citation · 
volume 12 • issue 13 • page 401 • column 2
content

For a gold brick game that makes J. Rufus Wallingford look like a tiddledy chip the Non-Partisan League is entitled to all the medals.

At $100 per farmer it has cashed in more than $1,000,000 for the privilege of buying at stores promised to be established at farming centers.

Of this $1,000,000, nearly $700,000 is authorized to be used for spreading the league propaganda—a gigantic slush fund.

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2580
The Ornithologist and Oölogist (journal)
publisher · 
Frank Blank Webster Company
location · 
Hyde Park, Massachusetts, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
672

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for The Ornithologist and Oölogist.
published in · 
The Ornithologist and Oölogist
date · 
February 1891
column title · 
Brief Notes
citation · 
volume 16 • issue 2 • page 29
content

The inside coterie of the A. O. U. just now seem to be engaged in a game of Tiddledy-winks, seeing who can jump the most names in the new list.

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2581
Our Paper (magazine)
publisher · 
Massachusetts Reformatory
location · 
Concord Junction, Massachusetts, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
117

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Our Paper.
published in · 
Our Paper
date · 
20 May 1911
title · 
What Would You Do
by · 
Elliot Flower
citation · 
volume 27 • issue 20 • page 230 • column 1
content

Sam Tanson was the first called, and Sam was an indictment in himself. The shade over one eye and the absence of two front teeth would have convinced the skeptical that he had not been playing tiddledywinks.

tw-ref-ID · 
382
The Outlook (magazine)
publisher · 
The Outlook Company
location · 
381 Fourth Avenue, New York, New York, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
673

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for The Outlook.
published in · 
The Outlook
date · 
9 January 1918
column title · 
By the Way
citation · 
volume 118 • issue 5 • page 195 • column 1
content

Why not let the children start with bridge and chess, and gradually work them up to the point where they can appreciate lotto, halma, and tiddledywinks?

notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2582
Patents for Inventions (official records)
Abridgments of Specifications
publisher · 
Darling & Son, Ltd., 1-3, Great St. Thomas Apostle, London, E.C.
location · 
Patent Office, 25, Southampton Buildings, Chancery Lane, W.C., London, London, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
674

Toggle showing 4 tiddlywinks references for Patents for Inventions.
published in · 
Patents for Inventions
date · 
1894
title · 
Abridgment Class Advertising and Display
citation · 
volume 1893-1896 Classes 1-5 • page 40 • column 1
content

6943. Kershaw, W., and Brierley, J. B. April 7.Drawings to Specification.

Advertising.—Advertisements may be placed on the boards or boxes used for educational parlour games, played somewhat after the manner of tiddledy winks.

notes · 
The print volume addresses 1893 to 1896 in Classes 1 to 5. Printed in 1899. The item identified is in 1894.
notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2583
published in · 
Patents for Inventions
date · 
1894
title · 
Abridgment Class Toys, Games,and Exercises
citation · 
volume 1893-1896 Classes 130-134 • page 97 • column 1
content

6943. Kershaw, W., and Brierley, J. B. April 7.

Illustration of a circular target with three concentric circles, having one open area in the innermost circle, 10 in the middle circle, and 16 in the outer circle. Three "h" markings appear in the figure. At right, a squidger is on a wink, along with a depiction of a dotted rotating path of the wink heading toward the round target.
FIG. 6
Illustration of a square item with shadows.
FIG. 6a
Illustration of a connectivity diagram between round objects, with two "e" markings on it.
FIG. 3.

Games played with balls or counters.—Relates to educational parlour games somewhat of the nature of tiddledy winks. In the example shown, a circular box h is divided into a number of compartments, having letters placed in the bottom thereof, into which counters or discs are projected by pressing on their edges, so as to spell out any desired word. Or the missile may be a ball, and be projected from a spring thrower, or from a trap e, by hitting the free end either with a striker so as to send the ball directly into the compartments, or with a small racquet so as to send the ball upwards and afterwards, while it is in the air, strike the ball with the racquet so as to drive it into one of the compartments. Numbered, instead of lettered, compartments may be employed; or, if desired, words may be employed whereby a verse of poetry or a sentence may be formed. Advertisements may be placed on the boards or boxes employed.

notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2584
published in · 
Patents for Inventions
date · 
1894
title · 
Abridgment Class Toys, Games,and Exercises
citation · 
volume 1893-1896 Classes 130-134 • page 128 • column 1 and 2
content

18,061 Ditchburn, W. Sept. 22.

Illustration of a human head device facing left with various letter indications on it.
FIG. 3

Games played with counters and the like.—Relates to a game resembling tiddledy winks, in which counters, coins, and the like are projected or thrown by players into the open mouth of amechanical head, which is either stationary or revolves, while the mouth may remain open or bealternately opened and closed. An oblong box carries a block F through which passes freely a spindle E, squared at the portion E1. The lower end carries a pulley C driven by a band C1 connected to another pulley on a shaft operated by a crank handle. The spindle E rests upon a stepped support H, while a second spindle G rests upon another stepped support H1. The supports are connected together, and can be shifted in position horizontally by a button u2. The head G is provided with a block R to which is fixed a plate N having a square opening in which the top of the squared portion E1 can enter. The lower jaw is pivoted so as to open and close, a roller being connected therewith. Above the block F is placed a crown cam wheel K having a pin T. The spindle E is also provided with a cam driver M. In the position shown, that is with both spindles E and G resting upon the lower step of the supports H, H1, the head rests upon the collar P, the pin T is out of engagement with the spindle G, the roller engages with the teeth of the crown wheel K, the squared portion E1 of the spindle E is out of engagement with the plate N, and the crank of the driver M engages with the teeth of the wheel K, the result being that the head remains stationary, while the wheel K rotates, causing the jaws to open and close by means of the roller riding up and down the teeth of the crown wheel. On sliding the plates H, H1 inwards slightly, the spindle E will be first raised. This will result in the top thereof engaging with the plate N, whereby the head will rotate along with the spindle, and the cam wheel rotating with the roller, the jaws will remain open. On further sliding the plates inwards, the spindle G will also be raised, so as to engage with the tooth T and prevent the wheel K from rotating, the resujt being that the roller will ride up and down the teeth thereof, and the jaws open and close in addition to the head turning round.

notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2585
published in · 
Patents for Inventions
date · 
1894
title · 
Appendix.
subtitle · 
A.D. 1894.
citation · 
volume 1893-1896 Class 146 • page 170 • column 1 and 2
content

6943. Kershaw, W., andBrierley, J. B. April 7.

Illustration of a circular target with three concentric circles, having one open area in the innermost circle, 10 in the middle circle, and 16 in the outer circle. Three "h" markings appear in the figure. At right, a squidger is on a wink, along with a depiction of a dotted rotating path of the wink heading toward the round target.
FIG. 6
Illustration of a square item with shadows.
FIG. 6a
Illustration of a connectivity diagram between round objects, with two "e" markings on it.
FIG. 3.

Reading, teaching.—Relates to educational parlour games somewhat of the nature of tiddledy winks. In the example shown, a circular box h is divided into a number of compartments, having letters placed in the bottom thereof, into which counters or discs are projected by pressing on their edges, so as to spell out any desired word. Or the missile may be a ball, and be projected from a spring thrower, or from a trap e, by hitting the free end either with a striker so as to send the ball directly into the compartments, or with a small racquet so as to send the ball upwards and afterwards, while it is in the air, strike the ball with the racquet so as to drive it into one of the compartments. Numbered, instead of lettered, compartments may be employed; or, if desired, words may be employed whereby a verse of poetry or a sentence may be formed. Advertisements may be placed on the boards or boxes employed.

notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2586
PC Week (magazine)
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
675

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for PC Week.
published in · 
PC Week
date · 
4 November 1986
title · 
Letters
title in English · 
Don't Toy With me
citation · 
page 61
collection · 
original (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2587
The Pedagogical Seminary (journal)
alternate name · 
Journal of Genetic Psychology (successor)
publisher · 
Louis N. Wilson (publisher), Press of Oliver B. Wood
location · 
Worcester, Massachusetts, USA
Notes

Edited by G. Stanley Hall

tw-pub-ID · 
676

Toggle showing 8 tiddlywinks references for The Pedagogical Seminary.
published in · 
The Pedagogical Seminary
date · 
October 1894
title · 
Education by Plays and Games
by · 
G. E. Johnson
citation · 
volume 3 • page 113
summary

Listing.

content

412 Tiddledy Winks, 1 m.b., e. ms. h.a.

  • 412: number in alphabetical list
  • 1: citation of the book by Champlin & Bostwick, Young folks' cyclopædia, 1890
  • m.b., e. ms. h.a.: fair value for mind, body, eye, muscular sense, hand and arm.

collection · 
transcript (NATwA)
notability rating · 
minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2588
published in · 
The Pedagogical Seminary
date · 
July 1897
title · 
A Study in Moral Education
by · 
J. R. Street
citation · 
volume 5 • issue 1 • page 23 and 24
content

The following list shows the games played by the girls: Hide and seek 56. Croquet 43. Tag 41. […] Hop-scotch, tiddledy winks 5.

In regard to the moral import of games, the following classification shows the way they are viewed by the boys and girls: […] Perserverance. Pigs-in-clover 9.Parchesi 9. Tennis 9. […] Tiddledy winks 2. […] Honesty. Croquet 19. Hide and seek. 18. Cards 12. […] tiddledy winks, innocence abroad, go bang (1 each).

tw-ref-ID · 
2589
published in · 
The Pedagogical Seminary
date · 
September 1899
title · 
Amusements of Worcester School Children
by · 
T. R. Croswell
citation · 
volume 6 • page 321 • column 1
summary

Listing in favorites of boys ("B") and girls ("G") from a survey made in Fall 1896

content

3. Contests with Objects.

Ball B 679-241, G 409-67; Marbles B 608-115, G 130-21; Football B 455-151, G I; Jackstones B 28-2, G 341-63; Hockey, Shinney, Polo B 313, G 8; Top B 176-28, G 11; Hop Scotch B 16, G 154-21; Croquet B 62-3, G 148-52; Hoop B 71-3, G 1 10-14; Stilts B 70-7, G 12; Bean Bag B 4, G 72-7; Pick Kuife B 57-4, G 3; Tenpins B 53-10, G 6; Tennis B 51-10, G 31-10; Tip Cat B 33-1, G 10-2; Tiddledy Winks B 22-6, G 31-3; Pillow Dex B 16-2, G 21-4; Horse Shoes, Quoits B 19-2, G 1; Fish Pond B 12-1, G 15; Pool, Billiards, B 13-2, G 2; Jackstraws B 4, G 11; Golf B 4-1, G 1; Cricket B 4, G 1; Battledore B 1, G 3; Bagatelle B 2,G 3; Parlor Ring Toss B 1, G 1

collection · 
photocopy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2590
published in · 
The Pedagogical Seminary
date · 
September 1899
title · 
Amusements of Worcester School Children
by · 
T. R. Croswell
citation · 
volume 6 • page 355 • column 1
summary

Quotations from boys ("B") and girls ("G") from a survey made in Fall 1896

content

“Such toys as checkers, dominoes and tiddledewinks, I like these toys because one can sit down and have some fun, but still be resting.” G. 13.

collection · 
photocopy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2591
published in · 
The Pedagogical Seminary
date · 
December 1900
title · 
A Study in the Play Life of Some South Carolina Children
by · 
Zach McGhee
citation · 
volume 7 • issue 4 • page 463 • column 1
content

Group of Plays in which Rivalry plays the most Important Part, the Object of the Game being to “Beat” an Opponent.

One Hole Cat, Golf, Walking to Jerusalem, Shinney, Marbles, Picking Eggs, Pretty Maids' Country, Authors, Dominoes, Up Jinks, Lotto, Football, Croquet, Battle, Knucks, Hull Gull, Jack in the Bush, Crokinole, Tennis, Open Gates as High as the Sky, Base, Parchesi, Charades, Cards, Ten Pins, Bean Bags, Stealing Chips, Wrestling, Jack Straws, Baseball, Snap, Foot and a Half, Simon Says Wig Wag, Pig in the Parlor, Jack Stones, Hop Scotch, Checkers, Bull Pen, Clumps, Parlor Croquet, Philopcena, Roly Poly, Dumb Scrambo, Geography, Pillow Dex, Basket Ball, Green, Five Hundred, Tit Tat Taw, Mumble Peg, Backgammon, Chess, Tiddledy Winks.

collection · 
photocopy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2592
published in · 
The Pedagogical Seminary
date · 
December 1900
title · 
A Study in the Play Life of Some South Carolina Children
by · 
Zach McGhee
citation · 
volume 7 • issue 4 • page 465 • column 1
summary

Listing of boys and girls choosing tiddledy winks in survey from Fall 1896

content

Tiddledy Winks, BOYS. 79 GIRLS. 120

collection · 
photocopy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2593
published in · 
The Pedagogical Seminary
date · 
December 1900
title · 
A Study in the Play Life of Some South Carolina Children
by · 
Zach McGhee
citation · 
volume 7 • issue 4 • page 473 • column 1
summary

Definition of the game of Tiddledy Winks

content

Tiddledy Winks. Shooting small disks into a cup by pressing quickly on the edge of the disks with another disk. Chief elements: Unusual Activity, Dexterity, Rivalry.

collection · 
photocopy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2594
published in · 
The Pedagogical Seminary
date · 
December 1909
title · 
The Influence of Kindergarten Methods on the Socialization of the School
by · 
Colin A. Scott
citation · 
volume 16 • issue 4 • page 550-552 • column 1
content

Condemn us in this room this morning to play tiddledywinks, and it might appeal to some who would shine, but others would certainly be out of it. We would be in a need of a method to make it interesting, but it could never be a completely or a truly social method, since our wills would not be engaged upon the object. What we would have to do would be either to pretend that tiddledywinks was something else—such as religion, philosophy, or education, or to play the game so as to join in, to be agreeeable, or because it would be a trial in overcoming which our virtue would be trained. But in these cases, we would not really be playing tiddledywinks at all. We would be distinctly conscious of an object beyond, which would be the real source or purpose of our action. We might be flirting. We might be showing off our rings. We might be joking or telling stories. Tiddledywinks would form a good automatic basis for these more genuine occupations. Here as you see the subject or object that we began with turns out to be no object at all, but is much more like a method of attaining other objects, while the method or way we do the thing is really the object.

This is, of course, a parable. Consider the mind of many a high school girl. Her Latin and algebra are to her, very often just tiddledywinks, and she is really engaged in carrying out curious purposes of her own. But the subject is often enough tiddledywinks to the teacher also, although the object the teacher is pursuing is perhaps religion, or a belief he is training the memory, the obedience or faithfulness of his pupils, simply earning his salary or other aims of social value. The trouble is that the real purposes of the pupils and the teacher hardly ever meet. They are isolated and foreign to one another; they have not been socialized as far as the class is concerned. The teacher rarely knows the real purposes of the pupils, and when he suspects them, they are not usually encouraged. He constantly insists that the subject is to be made the real object or purpose of the pupils' activity. Play tiddledywinks for its own sake.

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2595
Pediatrics (journal)
A Semi-Monthly Journal
publisher · 
Dillon Brown, M.D. (owner); George Carpenter, M.D. (editor)
location · 
254 West 54th Street, New York, New York, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
678

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Pediatrics.
published in · 
Pediatrics
date · 
15 May 1899
title · 
The Developmental Influences of Play
by · 
James Herbert McKee, M.D.
citation · 
volume 7 • issue 10 • page 464 • column 1
content

Many games are now played—”duck-on-the-rock,” “black man,” “crokinole,” “leap-frog,”—simple feats of all kinds, turning, somersaults, rolling over backward, marbles, “mumble-the-peg,” “prisoner’s base,” “puss in the corner,” “tiddledy winks,” “touch wood.”

tw-ref-ID · 
2596
People Weekly (magazine)
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
679

Toggle showing 3 tiddlywinks references for People Weekly.
published in · 
People Weekly
date · 
27 November 1978
column title · 
Lookout
title · 
A Guide to the Up and Coming
citation · 
volume 10 • issue 22 • page 138 • column all
summary

Photograph and article about Dave Lockwood .

collection · 
original (NATwA); digital image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
important
tw-ref-ID · 
2597
published in · 
People Weekly
date · 
22 August 1988
title · 
Playing to Win
citation · 
volume 30 • issue 8 • page 34(6)
summary

About President George H. W. Bush playing tiddlywinks.

tw-ref-ID · 
2598
published in · 
People Weekly
date · 
26 August 1991
title · 
Body and soul
title in English · 
People’s Sexiest Man Alive for 1991 is Patrick Swayze
citation · 
volume 36 • issue 7 • page 56(5)
tw-ref-ID · 
2599
Proceedings of the Philadelpha and National Conferences of the Construction Industries (journal)
location · 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
692

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Proceedings of the Philadelpha and National Conferences of the Construction Industries.
published in · 
Proceedings of the Philadelpha and National Conferences of the Construction Industries
date · 
15 April 1921
column title · 
Philadelphia Conference on the Construction Industries
title · 
eal Estate and Housing
by · 
John C. Ihlder
citation · 
section Part 1 • page 35 • column 2
content

The real estate men have recently set standards for themselves—adopted a code of ethics. So should the builders. The real estate code is the first step and it provides honesty and a square deal as between realtors and their clients, but it does not take into account the real estate man’s very great responsibility to his community. He, and you, the builders, are peculiarly responsible for the growth and development of your community. It lies in your hands more than in those of any other groups. Consequently, your codes should acknowledge your special responsibility, and you should definitely stand for meeting community standards. There is no game on earth that can be played successfully without rules, whether it is base-ball or tiddledy-winks. There is no game on earth that involves large groups of men that can be played without an umpire.

notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2637
The Philistine (periodical)
A Periodical of Protest
associated with · 
Society of the Philistines
location · 
East Aurora, New York, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
680

Toggle showing 3 tiddlywinks references for The Philistine.
published in · 
The Philistine
date · 
February 1902
citation · 
volume 14 • issue 3 • page 84 • column 1
content

The Professor avers that the Chicago custom of having rat round-ups, where the ladies occupy specially built platforms, urging on their lovers and husbands by applause and gladsome smiles, and the gentlemen & invited guests take up the side-walk in front of the host’s property and chase the rats—does not remedy the evil. As a social pastime, the Professor prefers Pro-gressive Euchre, Parchesi, or Tiddledy-Winks.

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2600
published in · 
The Philistine
date · 
December 1908
title · 
Heart to Heart Talks with Philistines by the Pastor of his Flock
citation · 
volume 28 • issue 1 • page 8 • column 1
content

A modicum of prosperity, and the owner of the female mind quits work, and her life is devoted to vacuity, tiddledy-winks, bridge whist, church fairs, the latest play and other society piffle. The books she reads are the six best sellers. But she is a woman and sex is strong in her head, at least.

notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2601
published in · 
The Philistine
date · 
May 1912
citation · 
volume 34 • issue 6 • page 200 • column 1
content

It admits a man of mediocre ability into a certain society on a basis which a person of similar attainments could never otherwise reach. And this, it should be explained, is the society of affectation, pretense, cheese-straws, tiddledy-winks and poetic parchesi.

notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2602
The Photographic Times (magazine)
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
681

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for The Photographic Times.
published in · 
The Photographic Times
date · 
23 February 1894
column title · 
Pictures Received
citation · 
volume 24 • whole 649 • page 128 • column 1
content

Pictures Received.

No. 775.—Two little genre pictures, ‘” Harmonious Discord” and ” Tiddledy Winks.” Children at play. We are much pleased with these pictures; the arrangement is beautiful in either of them. Let our fair young lady friend get master of the technics of photography, and she will be able to rival our Clarkson or Baldwin.

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2603
Pif Gadget (catalog)
location · 
France
tw-pub-ID · 
682

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Pif Gadget.
published in · 
Pif Gadget
citation · 
whole 1528 • page 3
summary

Gadget # 290 with three illustrations

content

MONTAGE: LE CLOWN JEU DE PUCE

collection · 
photocopy (NATwA); original (Pascal Pontremoli)
tw-ref-ID · 
2604
Playboy (magazine)
location · 
USA
archive website · 
tw-pub-ID · 
683

Toggle showing 8 tiddlywinks references for Playboy.
published in · 
Playboy
date · 
January 1959
column title · 
Playboy After Hours
citation · 
volume 6 • issue 1 • page 9 • column 1
content

Pardon us if we scuff our feet a little, verbally that is. Our head is hung in shame, and we cough softly in apology as we tell you that we're eight months late in reporting a world's championship sporting event. Last May, the Oxonian Tiddlers of Oxford University defeated the Cantab Winkers of Cambridge at tiddly-winks, and immediately claimed the world's championship. The score was a nip-and-tuck 113-111. The teams represented the cream of the world's winkers -- or tiddlers -- and the match was witnessed by several hundred fans. Tea was served at half time.

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
links · 
Playboy (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1764)
notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2612
published in · 
Playboy
date · 
September 1969
title · 
Campus Action Chart
citation · 
volume 16 • issue 9 • page 195 • column 8
summary

Entry for MIT

content

21. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

MIT’s two saving graces are the tiddlywinks championship of North America and incredible graffiti

collection · 
photocopy (NATwA); digitized image copy (NATwA)
links · 
Playboy (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1757)
notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2605
published in · 
Playboy
date · 
April 1971
title · 
Great Scott!
by · 
Saul Braun
citation · 
volume 18 • issue 4 • page 200 • column 3
summary

George C. Scott discussing his children

content

“Alex can't stand to lose,” he remarked. “He'd rather die than be beaten. At tiddlywinks, at anything. The most competitive person I’ve ever known.”

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
links · 
Playboy (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1762)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2610
published in · 
Playboy
date · 
September 1976
title · 
Slapstick or Lonesome No More!
subtitle · 
the strange memoirs of the final american president
by · 
Kurt Vonnegut, Jr.
citation · 
volume 23 • issue 8 • page 163 • column 1
content

Listen: We began with the mystery of how ancient peoples had erected the pyramids of Egypt and Mexico, and the great heads of Easter Island, and the barbaric arches of Stonehenge, without modern power sources and tools.

We concluded there must have been days of light gravity in olden times, when people could play tiddlywinks with huge chunks of stone.

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
links · 
Playboy (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1763)
notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2611
published in · 
Playboy
date · 
May 1977
column title · 
The Playboy Forum
title · 
Now Hear This
by · 
(Name withheld by request)
citation · 
volume 24 • issue 5 • page 61 • column 1
content

Our captain has also recently threatened to inform on any many who, as he puts it, “cheats on his wife.”

Shiver me timbers! That leaves darts and tiddlywinks. Frankly, I think we'd all rather raise a little Caine.

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
links · 
Playboy (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1761)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2609
published in · 
Playboy
date · 
April 1981
title · 
Little Annie Fanny
by · 
Harvey Kurtzman and Will Elder
citation · 
volume 28 • issue 4 • page 269 • column all
summary

Cartoon depicting winks being shot into a beer mug

content

YOU WON’T LET ME PUNCH THE BAG OR RIDE THE BULL… NOW, WHY CAN’T I PLAY THE TIDDLY WINKS?

THERE’S JUST SOME THINGS WASN’T MEANT FOR WOMEN, HONEY.

collection · 
original (NATwA); digitized image copy (NATwA)
links · 
Playboy (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1758)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2606
published in · 
Playboy
date · 
December 1986
title · 
Blindsight
subtitle · 
two kinds of people came to this planet—those who wanted to hide and those who wanted to seek
by · 
Robert Silverberg
citation · 
volume 33 • issue 12 • page 212 • column 3
summary

Uses the term "squidge"

content

The Earth was plastered right over the sun, with nothing but one squidge of hot light showing down below, like a diamond blazing on a golden ring.

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
links · 
Playboy (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1759)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2607
published in · 
Playboy
date · 
August 1991
title · 
Boomtown
by · 
Craig Vetter
citation · 
volume 38 • issue 8 • page 162 • column 3
content

This ain’t tiddlywinks

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2608
Playground (magazine)
To Promote Normal Wholesome Play and Public Recreation
associated with · 
Playground and Recreation Association of America
location · 
1 Madison Avenue, New York, New York, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
684

Toggle showing 5 tiddlywinks references for Playground.
published in · 
Playground
date · 
April 1913
title · 
How to Equip a Playroom
subtitle · 
The Pittsburgh Plan
by · 
Alice M. Corbin
citation · 
volume 7 • issue 1 • page 14 • column 1
content

Toys and Playthings for Children from 7 to 9

12. Games

  • Tumbeline
  • Down and Out
  • Jack Straws
  • Dominoes
  • Target games
  • Checkers
  • Tiddledy-winks
  • Messenger boy
  • Crokinole
  • Base ball game
  • Table croquet
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2613
published in · 
Playground
date · 
November 1922
title · 
Progressive Game Party
by · 
J. R. Batchelor
citation · 
volume 16 • issue 8 • page 382 • column 1
content

8. Tiddleywinks. This game may be played in three or four different ways, reference to which are found in the rules accompanying the game.

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2614
published in · 
Playground
date · 
January 1924
title · 
Bedside Games
by · 
Edna B. Montgomerie
citation · 
volume 17 • page 568 • column 2
content

Further suggestions for games include checkers, parchesi, jack straws [...]; and target games such as tiddle de winks, table basket ball, ring toss and others.

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2615
published in · 
Playground
date · 
January 1929
citation · 
volume 22 • page 576
summary

Tiddlywink Golf

tw-ref-ID · 
2616
published in · 
Playground
date · 
March 1931
citation · 
page 667
summary

Included in a list of games in community centers

tw-ref-ID · 
2617
Playthings (magazine)
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
685

Toggle showing 4 tiddlywinks references for Playthings.
published in · 
Playthings
date · 
around 1926
title · 
Pioneers in the Toy Business
notes · 
Source for McClintock book. (May not be in Playthings.)
tw-ref-ID · 
2618
published in · 
Playthings
date · 
1928
by · 
Alderman-Fairchild
summary

Advertisement including Blinky Blinx Tiddledy Winks

content source · 
Reproduced in the American Game Collectors Association, Game Times, whole issue 24, Vol. X, number 2, page 519.
tw-ref-ID · 
2619
published in · 
Playthings
date · 
June 1939
citation · 
page 50
summary

“Tidley Hop”

content source · 
Cited in U.S. design patent D367680, in 1996.
tw-ref-ID · 
2620
published in · 
Playthings
date · 
before 1942
summary

Photo prediction of adult winks interest.

content source · 
Reproduced in book by Ruth and Larry Freeman, A cavalcade of toys, © 1942, page 298.
collection · 
photocopy of 1942 Freeman book, page 298 (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2621
Popular Electronics (magazine)
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
686

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Popular Electronics.
published in · 
Popular Electronics
date · 
December 1956
title · 
4 Electronic Toy Projects
by · 
E. G. Louis
citation · 
volume 5 • issue 6 • page 47, 49 to 51
summary

3 photos and 1 wiring diagram for “Project 2 ‘Electronic Tiddly-Winks'”.

collection · 
original (NATwA)
notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2622
Popular Mechanics (magazine)
Written So You Can Understand It
publisher · 
H. H. Windsor (founder, editor: 1958)); H. H. Windsor, Jr. (editor and publisher: 1958)
location · 
160 Washington Street (1908); 200 East Ontario Street (1958), Chicago, Michigan, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
687

Toggle showing 2 tiddlywinks references for Popular Mechanics.
published in · 
Popular Mechanics
date · 
April 1908
title · 
A Mystery Solved.
by · 
Carlyle Smith
citation · 
volume 10 • section Advertising Section • issue 4 • page 106 • column 2
content

What is the Navy sailing for?” quoth I to Captain Binks.

“I do not know,” the Sea Dog said. “But this is what I thinks:

Bob Evans wants to teach the Japs the game of Tiddledy-winks.”

I put the question next unto our doughty Admirell.

”I do not know,” said he, “and if I did I wouldn’t tell.”

I thought he muttered something else that bade me go to thunder. […]

notes · 
Reprinted from Harper's Weekly.
notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2623
published in · 
Popular Mechanics
date · 
August 1958
title · 
Sandpaper Target Adds Fun to Tiddlywink Game
citation · 
page 178
content
Black and white illustration of a girl and boy kneeling on the floor, with the boy shooting winks at a square target with numbered circles (5, two of 10, 25, two of 50, two of 75, and 100). The square target is angled against a stack of two books.

To add a new twist to the old game of tiddlywinks, cement a sheet of medium-grit sandpaper to a square of plywood, draw circles and numerals on the paper as of [sic] plywood. Draw circles and prop the board at about 45-deg. angle to provide a sloping target for the disks snapped at it. The disks, falling upon the sandpaper, will tend to remain in place unless touched by other disks during succeeding shots. The trick, of course, is to snap the disks so that they come to rest on the highest numbers

collection · 
photocopy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2624
Popular Science Monthly (magazine)
alternate name · 
Appletons’ Popular Science Monthly; Popular Science
publisher · 
D. Appleton and Company; Popular Science Publishing Co., Inc. (1929+)
persons involved · 
William Jay Youmans (editor: 1897); Waldemar Kaempffert (editor: 1919); Raymond J. Brown (editor: 1935, 1939)
location · 
225 West 33th Street (1919); 250 Fourth Avenue (1929); 353 Fourth Avenue (1935, 1939), New York, New York, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
688

Toggle showing 9 tiddlywinks references for Popular Science Monthly.
published in · 
Popular Science Monthly
date · 
July 1897
title · 
The Mob Mind
by · 
Professor Edward A. Ross
citation · 
volume 51 • page 395 • column 1
content

As there must be in the typical mob a center which radiates impulses by fascination till they have subdued enough people to continue their course by sheer intimidation, so for the craze there must be an excitant, overcoming so many people that these can affect the rest by mere volume of suggestion. [...]

The fad originates in the surprise or interest excited by novelty. Roller-skating, blue glass, the planchette, a forty days’ fast, the “new woman,” tiddledy-winks, faith-healing, the “13-14-15” puzzle, baseball, telepathy, or the sexual novel attract those restless folk who are always running hither and thither after some new thing.

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2625
published in · 
Popular Science Monthly
date · 
October 1898
title · 
Some Psychical Aspects of Muscular Exercise
by · 
Luther Gulick M.D.
citation · 
volume 53 • page 801
summary

“tiddledywinks” in list of games played by children aged 7 to 12

content

During what I have called later childhood—from seven to twelve in girls—we have the height of the doll plays, elaborate housekeeping arrangements. Two of our children are now in this stage. They have secured all of the broken dishes, bits of tin, and other things that can be used for housekeeping, and in old boxes, in imaginary houses, or whatever is available, are going through with these elementary housekeeping arrangements. At about ten the interest in dolls seems to wane, but taking its place there is an interest in babies. It is a common thing to see girls at this age asking to borrow neighbors' babies to wheel them round in baby-carriages, to play with them, to swing them. Every one of our babies has been borrowed by neighbors' children of about this age. Boys do not borrow our babies; it is distinctly a feminine instinct to play with babies. Boys want knives, to whittle, all sorts of plays with strings, flying kites. The ball games are played, "one old cat," an elementary baseball game, swimming and rowing. Boys delight in the use of tools during this period, and in building all sorts of things; making little streams and dams, paddle-wheels and boats, simple machinery of all kinds. Many games are now played: "duck on the rock," "black man," "blindman's buff," "crokinole," "croquet," "leapfrog"; simple feats of all kinds, turning somersaults, rolling over backward, marbles, "mumble the peg," "prisoner's base," "puss in the corner," "tiddledywinks," "touch wood."

collection · 
photocopy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2626
published in · 
Popular Science Monthly
date · 
March 1906
title · 
Newspaper Football
by · 
Professor Edwin G. Dexter
citation · 
page 265 • column 1
content

Football is not a gentle game, and the boy who is entirely satisfied with tiddle-dy-winks, as well as his father, who in his day had been satisfied with similar games, may deem it over-strenuous.

notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2627
published in · 
Popular Science Monthly
date · 
June 1914
title · 
Is the Montessori Method a Fad?
by · 
Frank Pierrepont Graves
citation · 
volume 84 • page 609 • column 1
content

After all the popular excitement, spectacular magazine articles, and more or less interesting books on the subject, the busy man—even the educator—is still asking: “What is the Montessori Method?” Is it a wonderful discovery of educational principles, an ingenious invention of material and devices, or merely a new fad that has been exalted by manufacturers of educational apparatus and enterprising journalists into a profitable cult and propaganda? Will the inventor of the “didactic apparatus” be eventually enshrined a little above Pestalozzi and Froebel, Mann and Barnard, in the educational pantheon, or will she be relegated to the limbo of the exponents of tiddledy-winks and ping-pong, of Belgian hares and Teddy bears?

notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2628
published in · 
Popular Science Monthly
date · 
January 1919
title · 
Yes, Santa Got Safely through the War Zone
subtitle · 
And with Some Delightful Gifts
citation · 
volume 94 • issue 1 • page 21 • column 1
summary

Includes a photograph of a girl and boy playing a golf version of tiddlywinks on a table

content
Black and white photograph of a girl (at left, with a large bow in her hair) and boy (right, wearing a tie with a white shirt) at a table on which a tiddlywinks golf course is set up. Holes are represented by round wooden targets; hazards by triangular-sided blocks. Styli are held in the hand to shoot the winks.
A nine-hole table golf course that is an improvement on the once familiar tiddledy-winks
collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2629
published in · 
Popular Science Monthly
date · 
May 1929
title · 
Parlor Baseball Played with Tiddledywinks
citation · 
volume 114 • issue 5 • page 61 • column 2
content

YOU can make “hits,” “runs,” and ”fouls,” with a new table baseball game based on the old pastime of “tiddledywinks.” A diamond, laid out on a board about two square feet in area, is divided into zones. Small celluloid disks representing batted balls are snapped with a larger disk from home plate. They score “base hits,” ”home runs” or ”fouls,” according to the zones in which they land. A player is “out” when a disk comes to rest within or touching the line indicating any fielder’s position.

Each player has nine small disks, representing the members of a baseball team. He “bats” until he has three outs, and the one who has the highest score at the end of nine innings of play is the winner.

Black and white photograph of a girl (at left, holding a squidger in her right hand) and woman (at right), sitting at a table on which a tiddlywinks game board is situated.
Skill in snapping the tiddledywink “ball players” into desired zones of the field decides the winner of the novel game.
collection · 
digitized image (NATwA); original (NATwA)
notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2630
published in · 
Popular Science Monthly
date · 
May 1935
column title · 
Our Readers Say
title · 
Batters, too, Are Mystified By Ballistics of Baseball
citation · 
volume 126 • issue 5 • page 10 • column 3
content

Now that all of young America with the exception of those who like tiddledy-winks better are preparing to invade the sandlots of the nation in resuming the great national outdoor battle for baseball honors, why couldn’t we have an article on the ballistics of baseball? I would like to have explained to me the reasons why a speed ball has a lower trajectory than a slow ball, and why no pitcher has ever been able to forecast the gyrations of the old-time spit-ball.—B. R., Portland, Me.

collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2631
published in · 
Popular Science Monthly
date · 
March 1939
title · 
New Table Game Resembles Tennis
citation · 
volume 134 • issue 3 • page 139 • column 2
content
Black and white photograph of a young man (wearing a white shirt and dotted dark tie) sitting at a table, holding a dark racket-shaped squidger, in his left hand, on a white wink at the baseline of a mat marked as a tennis court, with a net at center held up by two light wooden rectangular pieces. Additional game contents appear in the foreground: 3 additional dark racket-shaped squidgers plus 6 additional white winks, representing tennis balls.
Thin discs are snapped across the “net” with miniature rackets.

Tiddledywinks and tennis are combined in a novel parlor game just introduced. Played on a felt pad measuring twelve by twenty-four inches and marked with white lines as on a real tennis court, the game uses thin disks which are snapped back and forth across a diminutive net by means of tiny rackets. Rules and scoring are similar to those used in tennis. In the photograph reproduced at the left, a player is shown about to serve from the back line of the court. In the foreground are the rackets and the “balls” used.

collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2632
published in · 
Popular Science Monthly
date · 
March 1944
title · 
The Kite That Smashed Berlin
by · 
Hickman Powell; Harold Kulick
citation · 
volume 144 • issue 3 • page 48B • column 2
content
Black and white photograph of hands outstretched, each holding a good luck item as identified in the caption.
For good luck, the tail gunner carries a spanner; Tex, a lucky farthing; upper gunner, a pair of toy boots; engineer, a tiddlywink; bomb-aimer, a sprig of heather.
collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2633
PowerPlant (magazine)
publisher · 
Pratt & Whitney Aircraft, Division of United Aircraft Corporation
location · 
06108, East Hartford, Connectictut, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
184

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for PowerPlant.
published in · 
PowerPlant
date · 
8 May 1970
title · 
Tiddlywinks… the Wave of the Future?
subtitle · 
Phil Villar—Master of the Squidger
citation · 
volume 27 • issue 9 • page 7 • column 1
content

Not many people realize that after the "squidge off" a great deal of "squopping" will take place before any player is able to "pot out".

[...]

Black and white photograph of a television with Phil Villar on Johnny Carson's The Tonight Show on NBC television.
Villar discusses on TV the ins and outs of tiddlywinks with Johnny Carson on "The Tonight Show."

[...]

Black and white photograph of Phil Villar, in profile, potting a wink on a tiddlywinks mat with pot and piles of winks.
Villar keeps his eye on the wink he has just squidged toward the pot. A knowledge of trajectories is useful in tiddlywinks, but only continual practice gives one the feel of the game.

[...]

Black and white photograph of two men watching Phil Villar make a shot on a tiddlywinks mat with pot and piles of winks.
Peter Silverberg, left, and Jerry Vitti, right, both combustion engineering, study Villar's technique as he attempts a strategic squop. Each of the winks is carefully shot into position in preparation for potting out.

[...]

collection · 
original (Drix/NATwA); digital copy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
555
Prevention (magazine)
tw-pub-ID · 
689

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Prevention.
published in · 
Prevention
date · 
December 1992
title · 
12 days to to tranquility: how to make the countdown to the holidays stress-free and joyful
citation · 
page 40 and later
summary

Includes techniques for self-massage.

tw-ref-ID · 
2634
Printers’ Ink (magazine)
publisher · 
Printers’ Ink Publishing Company
location · 
185 Madison Avenue, New York, New York
tw-pub-ID · 
690

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Printers’ Ink.
published in · 
Printers’ Ink
date · 
14 June 1922
title · 
The Letter That Capitalizes the Present and Kills the Future
by · 
Clifford W. Bent
citation · 
volume 119 • issue 11 • page 163
content

This able sales manager went a step farther in his analysis, in continuing, “[…] But I cannot and will not endeavor to fool any man into thinking that I sit up nights following his personal career and congratulating him on winning a silver mug in auction bridge at a charity affair, when the news comes to me cut from the society columns of his Sunday paper, and I haven’t the slightest idea whether auction bridge is a new structure over the East River or is played with tiddledy-winks.”

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2635
Psychological Science (journal)
publisher · 
SAGE Publications
tw-pub-ID · 
456

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Psychological Science.
published in · 
Psychological Science
date · 
1 April 2009
title · 
Predictive Eye Movements Are Driven by Goals, Not by the Mirror Neuron System
by · 
Rik Eshuis, Kenny R. Coventry, and Mila Vulchanova
citation · 
volume 20 • issue 4 • page 438-440
content

We ran three movement conditions: the human-agent condition, in which a human agent was shown moving a toy frog toward a goal container (i.e., [1human agent, 1human motion]); the self- propelled condition, in which no human agent was shown moving the frog (i.e., [_human agent, _human motion]); and the new condition, in which a human agent was shown with hand behind the starting point of the frog, flicking it so as to propel it along a trajectory (as in the game ‘‘Tiddlywinks’’; i.e., [1human agent, _human motion]; see Fig. 1a). In the latter condition, the human-agent intention is matched to that of the human-agent condition, but human motion is not shown along the trajectory. This allows a clean test of the MNS versus goal-intention explanations for the proactive eye- movement data.

a: Image of a hand pressing on frog-shaped figures to shoot them into a bucket. b: Graph with two axes.
Fig. 1. Example of the video used in the new (Tiddlywinks) condition and experimental results. In the illustration (a), the trajectories traversed by the frogs have been drawn in, but they were not visible during the experiment. The graph (b) shows mean gaze-arrival time relative to the frog’s arrival time (time 0; positive values indicate that gaze arrived before the frog) for the human-agent, new (Tiddlywinks), and self-propelled conditions with and without end effects. Error bars indicate _1 SEM.

[...[

For each condition, we also compared gaze arrival times to the arrival times of the frog. Significant proactive goal-directed eye movements occurred for the human-agent condition with end effects (i.e., [1human agent, 1human motion, 1end effects]), t(11) 5 4.34, prep 5 .99, d 5 1.25, and the new (Tiddlywinks) condition with end effects (i.e., [1human agent, _human motion, 1end effects]), t(11) 5 2.38, prep 5 .93, d 5 0.69, but not for any of the other four conditions, all t(11)s _ 1.99, all preps _ .90, all ds _ 0.57. Most notably, predictive eye movements do not occur for the human-agent condition without end effects (i.e., [1human agent, 1human motion, _end effects]), t(11) 5 0.35, prep 5 .59, d 5 0.10.

collection · 
digital PDF (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
1903
Public Libraries (magazine)
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
693

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Public Libraries.
published in · 
Public Libraries
date · 
December 1910
title · 
Circulation of Games by the Library
citation · 
volume 15 • issue 10 • page 430
content

Some of the games are as follows: A B C, anagrams, American battles, authors, checkers, chess, city life, consequences, store-keeping, dominoes, electrical wonder, flag game, flinch, fortune telling, geography, guess again, hidden titles, house that Jack built, Humpty Dumpty, Jack Horner, jack of all trades, jack-straws, luck, magic spelling, Mother Goose, nations, numericals, Old Glory, our country, pastime puzzle, picture reading, pit. Punch and Judy, quotations, ring toss, Robinson Crusoe, shopping, snap, tiddledy winks. United States map puzzle, useful knowledge, etc., etc.

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2638
The Publishers’ Weekly (magazine)
The American Book Trade Journal
location · 
Franklin Square (330 Pearl Street), New York, New York, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
694

Toggle showing 17 tiddlywinks references for The Publishers’ Weekly.
published in · 
The Publishers’ Weekly
date · 
5 December 1891
column title · 
Weekly Record of New Publications
citation · 
volume 40 • issue 23 • whole 1036 • page 932 • column 2
content

Bangs, J. Kendrick. Tiddledywink tales; il. by C: Howard Johson. N. Y., [De Witt Publishing House,] 1891. c. 5-236 p. il. D. cl., $1.25.

Jimmieboy was a little lad of four years, who had just been presented with a set of Tiddledywinks. After playing with his gift all day, Jimmieboy went to bed and was immediately transported to the realm of the Tiddledywinks. The strange and amusing sights that the young hero saw did not prevent a constant interchange of thourght between himself and the small pieces of celluloid that comprise the game.

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
links · 
Publishers’ Weekly (tw-ref-link-id 1783)
notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2639
published in · 
The Publishers’ Weekly
date · 
26 March 1892
title · 
Descriptive Summary of the Spring Announcements
citation · 
volume 41 • issue 13 • page 483 • column 2
content

The De Witt Publishing House will bring out shortly a most entertaining volume in the “ Tiddledywink’s Poetry-Book,” a collection of verse for children, by John Kendrick Bangs, illustrated by Charles Howard Johnson, and prettily gotten up.

links · 
Publishers’ Weekly (tw-ref-link-id 1790)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2646
published in · 
The Publishers’ Weekly
date · 
17 September 1892 to 24 September 1892
citation · 
volume 42 • issue 12 to 13 • whole 1077 to 1078 • page 381 to 382 • column 2 (page 381), 1 (page 382)
content
THE DEWITT PUBLISHING HOUSE [...] also announce [...] several new juveniles, chief of which is a new book by John Kendrick Bangs, illustrated by Charles Howard Johnson, entitled “In Camp with a Tin Soldier,” a successor to the popular “Tiddledy Wink Tales;” and this bright writer has also prepared a collection of verses for boys to be entitled “ The Tiddledy Winks Poetry Book and “ In Savage Africa," a book for boys, in which E. J. Glave, one of Stanley’s officers, tells of six years of adventure in Congoland. Titles are fully given under the headings, Sports, Games and Amusements ; Education, Language, etc., and Juvenile Literature, in the classified list preceding this department.

links · 
Publishers’ Weekly (tw-ref-link-id 1785)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2641
published in · 
The Publishers’ Weekly
date · 
24 September 1892
by · 
L. Prang & Co.
citation · 
volume 42 • issue 12 to 13 • whole 1077 to 1078 • page 525 • column 1
content

PRANG's Holiday Publications.

SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT

Our travellers show during their second trip a number of additional publications of a highly attractive character. Among them are four humorous animal pictures by Miss S. A. Winn, the painter of our popular publication, “The Prize Piggies.” The animals are attentive players of various games, as follows:

  • TIDDLEDY-WINKS (CATS).
  • WHIST (OWLS).
  • HIGH-LOW-JACK (DONKEYS).
  • EUCHRE (DOGS).

L. PRANG & CO., Flne Art Publishers,

NEW YORK: 43, 45, 47 E. 10th St., near B’way. BOSTON, MASS.

links · 
Publishers’ Weekly (tw-ref-link-id 1791)
notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2648
published in · 
The Publishers’ Weekly
date · 
19 November 1892
by · 
L. Prang & Co.
citation · 
volume 42 • issue 21 to 22 • page 174 • column 2
content

PRANG's Holiday Publications.

SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT

Our travellers show during their second trip a number of additional publications of a highly attractive character. Among them are four humorous animal pictures by Miss S. A. Winn, the painter of our popular publication, “The Prize Piggies.” The animals are attentive players of various games, as follows:

  • TIDDLEDY-WINKS (CATS).
  • WHIST (OWLS).
  • HIGH-LOW-JACK (DONKEYS).
  • EUCHRE (DOGS).

L. PRANG & CO., Flne Art Publishers,

NEW YORK: 43, 45, 47 E. 10th St., near B’way. BOSTON, MASS.

links · 
Publishers’ Weekly (tw-ref-link-id 2218)
notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2647
published in · 
The Publishers’ Weekly
date · 
10 December 1892
column title · 
Weekly Record of New Publications
citation · 
volume 42 • issue 24 • whole 1089 • page 1050 • column 2
content

Bangs, J: Kendirck. In camp with a tin solider; il. by E. M. Ashe. N. Y., [DeWitt Publishing House,] R. H. Russel & Son, 1892. c. 5-194 p. il. D. cl. $1.25.

A sequel to the ”Tiddledywink tales.” Jimmieboy is the hero, as he was in the former story. In the present tale he is for a time subject to the orders of his tin regiment in a proposed encounter with a “parallelopipedon.” The adventures of this pair are humorously told.

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
links · 
Publishers’ Weekly (tw-ref-link-id 1784)
notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2640
published in · 
The Publishers’ Weekly
date · 
17 November 1894
column title · 
Books for Young People
citation · 
volume 46 • issue 20-11 • page 114g • column 2
content

Tiddledywinks Poetry Book. Bangs. Il. $1… Russell

Tiddledywink Tales. Bangs. Il. $1.25… Russell

links · 
Publishers’ Weekly (tw-ref-link-id 1787)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2643
published in · 
The Publishers’ Weekly
date · 
24 May 1924
column title · 
The Weekly Book Exchange
subtitle · 
Books Wanted
citation · 
volume 105 • issue 21 • page 1766 • column 2
content

Brentano's, New York—Continued

Tiddledy Winks, John Kendrick Bangs.

links · 
Publishers’ Weekly (tw-ref-link-id 1786)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2642
published in · 
The Publishers’ Weekly
date · 
30 July 1949
by · 
Lothrop, Lee & Shepard Co., Inc.
citation · 
volume 156 • issue 5 • page 50 • column 1
content

Lothrop BOOKS

A LOTHROP discovery!

We fondly expect Miss Flora McFlimsey to become the most popular doll-character since Raggedy Ann. Miss Flora is an old forgotten doll who lives in an attic with a torn box of tiddlywinks and an old, old doll’s trunk. But anything can happen on Christmas Eve, and wonderful things do happen to Miss Flora... and to any little girl who is lucky enough to receive this most delightful children’s book in years.

Miss Flora McFIimsey’s Christmas Eve

Written and illustrated in full color by MARIANA. October 3, ages 4-8, $1.00

links · 
Publishers’ Weekly (tw-ref-link-id 1793)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2650
published in · 
The Publishers’ Weekly
date · 
18 May 1959
column title · 
Lower Priced Paperbacks Fiction
title · 
BEN HUR
subtitle · 
Lew Wallace.
citation · 
volume 175 • issue 20 • page 65 • column 1
content

The battle between paperback houses to cash in on the publicity attendant upon the forthcoming $15,000,000 MGM movie production of Lew Wallace's biblical epic makes that chariot race in “Ben Hur” look like tiddledy winks!

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
links · 
Publishers’ Weekly (tw-ref-link-id 1788)
notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2644
published in · 
The Publishers’ Weekly
date · 
22 July 1968
title · 
Next Month's Best!
by · 
Parliament News Inc.
citation · 
volume 194 • issue 4 • page 65 • column 3
content

BRANDON HOUSE ORIGINALS

Illustration of book cover

TIDDLYWINKS by John Drummond… A very funny cartoon book for adults, with introduction by comic Jack Carter. (01021—$1.00)

PARLIAMENT NEWS, INC.

7311 Fulton Ave., N. Hollywood, Calif. 91605

links · 
Publishers’ Weekly (tw-ref-link-id 1796)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2653
published in · 
The Publishers’ Weekly
date · 
16 June 1975
by · 
The Two Continents Publishing Group, Ltd.
citation · 
volume 207 • issue 24 • page 36 • column 1
content

Compare— you'll agree that its 2000 games and 5000 color illustrations make it incomparable

Illustration of book cover.

THE WAY TO PLAY

The Illustrated Encyclopedia of the games of the World by The Diagram Group

It’s from the creators of the continuing best seller, Rules of the Game.

It includes the rules, techniques, scoring, materials, and equipment used in playing more than 2000 games, from the very newest to those centuries old, throughout the world.

And its 5000-plus charts, diagrams, and drawings blended with a remarkably clear text, make it the most comprehensive reference book of its kind ever written—

For beginners and novices and experts; for adults and children; for activists and armchair enthusiasts. A book for every home.

The games? Where do we begin? Backgammon, Table Tennis, Pool, Darts, Three-handed Bezique, Blow Football, Polish Checkers, Hasami Shogi, Tiddlywinks Golf, Baccarat, Memory, Battleships, Mah Jongg, Nine Men’s Morris—the list is virtually endless.

No wonder the first printing is 100,000. No wonder the Literary Guild has made it an All-Club offering. Without question, this is the most spectacular games book ever published—and will be one of 1975’s truly spectacular gift books.

A Two Continents/Paddington Press book

LCCN 75-11169 ISB 0-8467-0060-3 $15.95

links · 
Publishers’ Weekly (tw-ref-link-id 1794)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2651
published in · 
The Publishers’ Weekly
date · 
24 January 1977
by · 
New American Library
citation · 
volume 211 • issue 4 • page 153 • column 1
content

The New Adulthood—a revolutionary idea whose time has come. And here is its manifesto...

THE MATURE PERSON’S GUIDE TO KITES, YO-YOS, FRISBEES AND OTHER CHILDLIKE DIVERSIONS

by Paul Dickson

Whether you are an armchair Frisbee coach, a collector of antique marbles, or a secret devotee of the yo-yo, you are in for a treat with this guide to gentle, non-polluting fun for millions of recreation-minded grownups. Flere is a complete Baedeker of games too good for children alone to play—featuring such pastimes as kite-fighting, skateboarding, paper airplanes, jump-rope rhymes, the definitive rules for marbles, tiddlywink strategy and tactics, and how to win at Monopoly without cheating. With names of suppliers, profiles of superstars, bibliography, and over 100 stunning illustrations. 10-copy counter display available. A Plume Original Z5143 $5.95

links · 
Publishers’ Weekly (tw-ref-link-id 1792)
notability rating · 
minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2649
published in · 
The Publishers’ Weekly
date · 
17 October 1986
column title · 
Forecasts
title · 
CALL OF THE GAME
citation · 
volume 230 • issue 16 • page 50 • column 3
content

CALL OF THE GAME Steve McKee. McGraw-Hill, $15.95 ISBN 0-07-045354-3

The year 1983 was a sports junkie’s dream come true for New York schoolteacher McKee, who took a sabbatical to attend sporting events throughout the U.S. He began with bobsled racing at Lake Placid in January and ended with the Super Bowl at Tampa the following January. In between were contests like the first night game of the U.S. Football League in Birmingham, the NCAA basketball championships in Albuquerque and the World Series in Philadelphia and Baltimore. Then there were the games of less moment like the National Jousting Tournament in the nation’s capital, the National Juggling Festival in New York State and the Continental Team Tiddlywinks Championships in Boston. McKee describes some 55 events—the participants, the spectators and the sites—with infectious enthusiasm, and the result is unadulterated fun for the reader. 15,000 first printing $15,000 ad/promo. (December 1)

links · 
Publishers’ Weekly (tw-ref-link-id 1797)
notability rating · 
minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2654
published in · 
The Publishers’ Weekly
date · 
16 November 1990
column title · 
Forecasts
title · 
Fiction
citation · 
volume 237 • issue 46 • page 43 • column 3
content

EVENINGS AT MONGINI'S: And Other Stories

Russell Lucas. Summit, $17.95 ISBN 0-671-72746-X

[...]But a barrage of salacious encounters numbs the reader: these are the kind of entertainments in which a disproportionate number of the femal characters turn out to be lesbians, as reported in the final paragraphs, and in which voyeurism is as common as tiddledywinsk, brothels as banal as parking lots. (Jan.)

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
links · 
Publishers’ Weekly (tw-ref-link-id 1789)
notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2645
published in · 
The Publishers’ Weekly
date · 
14 September 1992
title · 
Stomping Grounds: A Pilgrim's Progress Through Eight American Subcultures
citation · 
volume 239 • issue 41 • page 94 • column 3
content

W. Hampton Sides.

Morrow, $20 (320p) ISBN 0-688-09049-4

Contemplating the various subcultures into which Americans organize themselves, freelance journalist Sides once mused, “If an American was into tiddlywinks, he could start a national association, and tiddlywinkers in their thousands would come crawling from the woodwork.” Finding to his surprise that there actually was such an association, he set off to explore the national passion for joining. Sides attended the annual gatherings of eight associations that particularly titillated him; he reports here on a reunion of the power elite at the campy but exclusive Bohemian Club in San Francisco and the religious ardor he observed at annual meetings of Tupperware saleswomen, recreational-vehicles owners, sledders, aging hippies and Church of God disciples, among others. Almost always curious and entertaining, his descriptions of the settings, the members, the mystiques, the hoopla, the charismatic leaders and the histories of these groups throw revealing light on an idiosyncratic aspect of the national character. Photos not seen by PW. (Oct.)

links · 
Publishers’ Weekly (tw-ref-link-id 1795)
notability rating · 
minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2652
published in · 
The Publishers’ Weekly
date · 
11 March 2002
column title · 
Forecasts
title · 
THE BANANA SCULPTOR, THE PURPLE LADY, AND THE ALL-NIGHT SWIMMER: Hobbies, Colleting, and Other Passionate Pursuits
citation · 
volume 249 • issue 10 • page 64 • column 3
content

THE BANANA SCULPTOR, THE PURPLE LADY, AND THE ALL-NIGHT SWIMMER: Hobbies, Collecting, and Other Passionate Pursuits

Susan Sheehan and Howard Means.

Simon & Schuster, $25 (288p) ISBN 0-7432-0122-1

Lots of people have hobbies—golf, knitting, collecting baseball cards —but the subjects of this lively oral history have bypassed the obvious pursuits. Instead, they collect Noah’s arks and Gore Vidal memorabilia, swim the Great Lakes and play competitive tiddlywinks. Sheehan (Is There No Place on Earth for Me?) and Means (Colin Powell: Soldier/Statesman Statesman/Soldier) interviewed 40 Americans with unusual hobbies. They provide some narrative, but mainly allow their subjects to speak for themselves—and the individuals aren't shy. They hold forth on everything from walking across suspension bridges to having the largest marble collection in the country'. Other subjects include a one-handed bonsai gardener, a competitive kite-flying couple and “the Purple Lady,” a Tennessee woman named Sonia Young who dresses in purple, lives in a purple-decorated house, drives a purple car and admits “without being the Purple Lady I don’t think I have an identity.” Some common themes emerge: many refer to their obsessions as life changing; they value the connections they make with kindred spirits or appreciate the relaxation their activity provides; and most find chasing their goal more satisfying than actually completing a collection or setting a record. Although the authors provide no analysis of their topic, the book is an enjoyable read—in short snatches—and offers an unusual insider’s look at America’s unconventional pastimes. Agents, Robert Lescher and Rafe Sagalyn. (Apr. 5)

links · 
Publishers’ Weekly (tw-ref-link-id 1798)
notability rating · 
minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2655
Puck (magazine)
publisher · 
Keppler & Schwarzmann (publishers)
location · 
Puck Building, corner of Houston & Mulberry Streets, New York, New York, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
695

Toggle showing 3 tiddlywinks references for Puck.
published in · 
Puck
date · 
22 October 1890
title · 
A Pleasing Change
by · 
Jack Wylie
citation · 
volume 28 • whole 711 • page 135 • column 1
content

Jack Wylie—Have you been playing any poker lately?

Mr. B. T. Flush.— No; I’ve quit. My luck was too bad. But I’ve got a cinch on that new game, “Tiddledy Winks.” Ever hear of it?

Jack Wylie.— Oh, yes; they call it “Idiot’s Delight.” But why do you do better at that?

Mr. B. T. Flush. — Because the man who puts in the most chips wins.

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2656
published in · 
Puck
date · 
4 March 1891
title · 
TIDDLEDY WINKS.
citation · 
volume 29 • whole 730 • page 20 • column 1
content

SAY BLAINE, whatever do you mean
When you wink the other eye?
Say, don’t you think we’re awful green
When you wink the other eye?
You talked about the tariff, and you told us it would bring
Health and wealth and happiness; we thought it quite the thing.
But when you got us on the string,
Then you winked the other eye.

Say, Blaine, whatever can it be,
When you wink the other eye?
You gave us reciprocity,
Then you winked the other eye.
We took our little ballots, and how gayly did we speed!
Oh, what’s become of Ingalls, Quay, and little Tommy Reed?
Oh, Jeems, we ‘re on to you, indeed,
When you wink the other eye.

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2657
published in · 
Puck
date · 
8 April 1891
title · 
TOO MUCH.
by · 
Harry Romaine
citation · 
volume 29 • whole 735 • page 99 • column 2
content

A thrill of mortifying pain
Darts through my large and lofty brain,
When some young lady thinks
That I can spend a futile night,
And play with infantile delight,
”Progressive Tiddledy Winks.”

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2658
Punch (magazine)
alternate name · 
Punch, or the London Charivari; Mr. Punch's Almanack
location · 
London, London, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
696

Toggle showing 6 tiddlywinks references for Punch.
published in · 
Punch
date · 
15 April 1843
title · 
NARRATIVE OF AN EXCURSION TO THE FROZEN LAKE OF THE GLACIARIUM.
subtitle · 
UNDERTAKEN BY MR. TIDDLEDY WINKS, THE CELEBRATED TRAVELLER,AND COMMUNICATED BY HIM.
by · 
Mr. Tiddledy Winks
citation · 
volume 4 • whole 93 • page 164 • column 2
content

NEXT to the ascent of Haverstock Hill, and passage of HampsteadHeath, perhaps there is no excursion in the vicinity of London, requiringsuch great exertions or heedlessness of danger as the one I am about to describe. It should only be attempted by those capable of bearing intense bodily fatigue, as well as those favoured individuals to whom a shilling isnot a coin of too great rarity, for at the very lowest rate of expenditure,the trip cannot be accomplished under that sum. [...]

(Signed)

Tiddledy Winks.

notes · 
Very early (1843) use of the term “Tiddledy Winks”, though not in the context of the game.
collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
not tiddlywinks game
tw-ref-ID · 
2659
published in · 
Punch
date · 
30 September 1843
title · 
THE INSTITUTION AT HOOKHAM-CUM-SNIVEY.
citation · 
volume 5 • whole 117 • page 146 to 147 • column 2 (page 146); 1 (page 147)
content

The following particulars have been furnished by our friend, Mr. TiddledyWinks, the indefatigable secretary, and also editor of the Peckham RailwayTimes & Camberwell-Green Chronicle: [...]

Hon. Sec.
Mr. Tiddledy Winks

<--! Page 147, column 1: -->

(Signed) Tiddledy Winks Hon. Sec.

notability rating · 
not tiddlywinks game
tw-ref-ID · 
2660
published in · 
Punch
date · 
28 June 1899
title · 
In the Toys and Games Department.
citation · 
volume 116 • section 1899 Almanack • page "The First of October" • column 3
summary

Almanack entry for October 1899

content

Particular Lady. I—a—want some sort of game for two small boys about eight or nine.

Assistant. For juveniles of that age I can strongly recommend the game of “Ascot.” You wind the little horses along on a reel at the end of a string, and the one which gets in first is the—ah—winner.

P. L. (severely). I should be sorry, indeed, to give any boys a game that encourages a taste for the turf.

A. Of course it—ah—might have that tendency. Here is a highly amusing game called—ah—“Tiddledywinks.”

P. L. (icily). Tiddledy-I beg your pardon?

A. (with dignity). Tiddledy-winks, madam.

P. L. And pray how do you—a—tiddledywink?

A.It is—ah—not one of my recreations, madam, but you will find full instructions supplied with each set, and I understand that they are so simple that the merest child can easily become—ah—proficient.

P. L. And go tiddledywinks all over the place? A most undesirable accomplishment in my opinion.

A. Pardon me—I think, madam, you are misled be the associations of the title, which may, perhaps—ah—verge on vulgarity, but the game itself is perfectly free from objection, and popular with the most select and refined circles.

P. L. (firmly). The name is quite sufficient.

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2661
published in · 
Punch
date · 
4 November 1908
title · 
AMUSINGS.
subtitle · 
II. UNEMPLOYED.
by · 
S. John Otsakura
citation · 
volume 135 • page 341 • column 2
content

“Mr. BURNS, whose ethics have been so ably eviscerated by the first speaker, is not up to much. It is obvious as a pike-shaft that if we all adopted the course of the sweet singer of Battersea we should finish up as feathered habitués of the privet-hedge of P.C.-ishness. Counting noses, on this hypotenuse, I can see at one blow forty-odd working-men each drawing from the well two thousand quids per annum as easy as tiddledy-winking! [...]”

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2662
published in · 
Punch
date · 
3 December 1913
title · 
BIFF-BALL.
subtitle · 
THE NEW GAME THAT EVERYONE WILL SOON BE PLAYING. (With acknowledgments to many of our contemporaries.)
citation · 
volume 145 • page 474 • column 1
content

INTENT upon learning what game is to fill our homes with innocent merriment tliis Christmas, our representative yesterday visited the vast emporium of Tiddledy, Winks & Co., and interviewed the genial manager.

The game of the coming season?” repeated the latter. ” Undoubtedly Biff-Ball. Come with me.”

Our representative followed him into another room, where a large green cloth was found to be laid on the floor, securely pegged at the four corners. Two goals were placed at opposite ends of this cloth, and a wooden ball about the size of an orange reposed in the middle of it.”

This is all the apparatus required,” said the manager. ”The rules are equally simple. Two players insinuate themselves between the cloth and the floor, and at a given signal each endeavours to urge the ball from underneath through his opponent’s goal. We claim that Biff-Ball will promote more hilarity among spectators in ten minutes than any other sport in a week, while among players it has already been found to cure gout, indigestion and obesity and to conduce to a beneficial thickening of theskull. Mr. SHAW has praised it on the ground that it abolishes the absurd tradition of chivalry roward women (for, of course, “mixed” matches will be infrequent). Mr CHESTERTON has challenged the Bishop of London to a series of three matches to be played on Boxing-Day, and Bombardier Wells, the eminent pugilist, is using it as his principal means of traing in preparatoin for his great fight with CARPENTIER.

Biff-Ball is destined to be among indoor games what the Tango is among dances. In a few weeks it will have swept the country from John o’Groats to Land’s End, not excluding John Bull’s Other Island, as MR. KIPLING has wittily termed it… Good morning, if you must go. I think we shall have rain shortly, but Biff-Ball will keep you amused through the most depressing weather.” [...]

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2663
published in · 
Punch
date · 
15 July 1914
title · 
TOO MUCH CHAMPIONSHIP.
subtitle · 
Once life was an easy thing.
citation · 
page 69
content

And the Olympic games are coming! Who are England's hopes in the discus-throwing and the fancy diving? What Britisher must we rely on in the javelin hop-skip-and-jump?

Your brain reels at the prospect. We must decide to ignore all future championships. We must decline to be aggravated if a Japanese Badminton champion appears. We must cease to be interested if Britain's Hope beats the Horrible Peruvian at Tiddly-winks.

There are three admirable reasons for this.

The first is that we must play some games ourselves.

The second, that, unless a check be put to championships, the Parliamentary news will be crowded out of the papers and we shall find ourselves in an unnatural state of peace and goodwill.

The third, which one puts forward with diffidence, is that somebody, somewhere, somehow, sometime must do a little work.

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2664
The Puritan (magazine)
A Journal for Gentlewomen
publisher · 
Frank A. Munsey (publisher)
location · 
111 Fifth Avenue, New York, New York, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
697

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for The Puritan.
published in · 
The Puritan
date · 
December 1900
title · 
Suggestions for Small Parties
by · 
Mary Louise Graham
citation · 
volume 9 • issue 3 • page 483 • column 2
content

A Salmagundi party was the entertainment prepared for one evening. A different kind of game was played at each of the little tables with which the room was filled. The winners progressed from one table to the next, and prizes were distributed at the end of the evening. There are a great many games that are suitable for a Salmagundi party, Lotto, for instance, and tiddledywinks, shooting with air pistols at a target, parlor golf, crokinole, authors, angling, and various games of cards.

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2665
The Radio Times (magazine)
The Official Organ of the B.B.C.
associated with · 
British Broadcasting Corporation
location · 
UK
tw-pub-ID · 
698

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for The Radio Times.
published in · 
The Radio Times
date · 
around 10 March 1958
summary

Reference to the Cambridge University Tiddlywinks Club vs. the Goons royal tiddlywinks match.

tw-ref-ID · 
2666
Rarities (magazine)
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
699

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Rarities.
published in · 
Rarities
date · 
July 1982 to August 1982
title · 
Board Games
by · 
Robert Hencey
citation · 
page 37 to 38; 64 to 65
summary

Includes 2 photographs and references.

collection · 
original (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2667
Reader's Digest (magazine)
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
701

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Reader's Digest.
published in · 
Reader's Digest
date · 
October 1987
title · 
Caution: Geniuses at Work and Play
citation · 
page 215
summary

Mention in an article about MIT.

notes · 
Reprint from the New England Monthly, October 1986.
collection · 
original (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2668
Relief Society Magazine (magazine)
associated with · 
Relief Society of the Church of the Latter-day Saints
location · 
Room 29, Bishop's Building, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
702

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Relief Society Magazine.
published in · 
Relief Society Magazine
date · 
August 1917
title · 
Lesson IV. Home Economics
subtitle ·&n