Newspapers and Newsletters Other than School Publications

Toggle Showing All ReferencesEntries are ordered first by country, then subcountry, state or county, city, and publication name.
Australia
(Western Australian newspaper) (newspaper)
location · 
Australia
tw-pub-ID · 
759

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for (Western Australian newspaper).
published in · 
(Western Australian newspaper)
date · 
soon after 29 March 1959
summary

Coverage of the Empress match Club match with Cambridge University

content

Tiddlywinks is the most upper-class of games in England. Its patron is the Duke of Edinburgh, and its players include the intellectual cream of the universities, titled young men, and the Goons.

notes · 
Cited in Winking World 4, page 7.
notability rating · 
potentially interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2792
Victoria • (state)
Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
The Age (newspaper)
location · 
Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
tw-pub-ID · 
758

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for The Age.
published in · 
The Age
date · 
14 June 1958
title · 
Tiddly Winks Gets Stablised
citation · 
page 4 • column 8
content

The first Tiddly Winks Congress ended yesterday at Cambridge University. Delegates from the major universities agreed on a set of rules for all future tournaments. The first English tiddly winks association was also set up.

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
important
tw-ref-ID · 
2791
Bahrain
Gulf Daily News (newspaper)
location · 
Bahrain
tw-pub-ID · 
760

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Gulf Daily News.
published in · 
Gulf Daily News
date · 
15 December 1984
column title · 
Sport
title · 
A year of change
citation · 
page 82
notes · 
"Tribute to Bahrain 1984"
collection · 
photocopy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2793
Canada
Evening Standard (newspaper)
location · 
Canada
tw-pub-ID · 
773

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Evening Standard.
published in · 
Evening Standard
date · 
29 May 1971
tw-ref-ID · 
2807
Ontario • (province)
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Ottawa Citizen (newspaper)
location · 
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
tw-pub-ID · 
775

Toggle showing 3 tiddlywinks references for Ottawa Citizen.
published in · 
Ottawa Citizen
date · 
22 January 1971
title · 
Squidging… …squopping
subtitle · 
That strategic, gripping and growing sport—tiddlywinks
citation · 
page 24
summary

Photograph.

collection · 
original (NATwA/Drix)
notability rating · 
important
tw-ref-ID · 
2809
published in · 
Ottawa Citizen
date · 
29 April 1971
citation · 
page 3
tw-ref-ID · 
2810
published in · 
Ottawa Citizen
date · 
3 May 1971
title · 
Mr. Tiddle and General Wink
citation · 
page 10
summary

Photograph.

collection · 
original (NATwA/Drix)
notability rating · 
important
tw-ref-ID · 
2811
The Ottawa Journal (newspaper)
location · 
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
tw-pub-ID · 
161

Toggle showing 4 tiddlywinks references for The Ottawa Journal.
published in · 
The Ottawa Journal
date · 
17 September 1955
title · 
Mickey Finn
by · 
Lank Leonard
citation · 
section Weekend Comic Section
content

Phil certainly thinks that Mr. Mooney should go after the $100,000 question tonight, doesn‘t he, Mrs. Finn?

Yes! But I hope Philip keeps out of it Flossie! It's something that Mr. Mooney should decide for himself!

Don't listen to Clancy, Mooney! Take my advice and shoot the works!

But Phil, if I'm not able to answer it, I'll lose the $75,000 I've already won!

I'll read the question once again, Mr. Mooney! "Name the man who invented the game of tiddlywinks and state where the first game was played!"

?

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
links · 
Ottawa Journal (tw-ref-link-id 1863)
notability rating · 
interesting
type · 
comic
tw-ref-ID · 
2818
published in · 
The Ottawa Journal
date · 
12 December 1970
title · 
'Squidgeoff' With Ottawa's Tiddlywinks Team
by · 
Margot Andresen
citation · 
page 4 • column 1
content
Black and white photograph of Rosie Wain and Andy Tomaszewski, holding a copy of Newswink 3, with headline: WAND DRAFTED.

Rosemary Wain and Andy Tomaszewski, editors of the tiddlywinks players' news sheet Newswink, proudly look over their publication. It's the official publication of the North American Tiddlywinks Association, with 20 clubs and more than 200 members. The Ottawa players are tops in Canada in tiddlywinks and second in North America.

(Journal Photo by Dominion Wide)

collection · 
original (NATwA); original (Drix/NATwA); digital copy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
510
published in · 
The Ottawa Journal
date · 
29 April 1971
title · 
Preparing for Tiddlywink Championships
by · 
CP-Journal Wirephoto
citation · 
page 3 • column 1
content
Black and white photograph of Rosie Wain (left) holding a squidger as a wink heads to the pot in the foreground. Andy Tomaszewski (right) is looking on. Both have their heads just above the mat on the table.

PREPARING FOR TIDDLYWINK CHAMPIONSHIPS

Carleton University students Rosemary Wain and Andy Tomaszewski have their eyes on the cup during a practice session Wednesday as they prepare for the North Americn tiddlywink championships, to be held at Carleton this weekend. Tiddlywink experts who have traveled 8,000 miles for tiddlywink competitions, will face 12 other two-man teams in vyring for the coveted annual prize.

(CP-Journal Wirephoto)

collection · 
digital image copy (NATwA)
links · 
Ottawa Journal (tw-ref-link-id 1861)
notability rating · 
important
tw-ref-ID · 
2815
published in · 
The Ottawa Journal
date · 
3 May 1971
title · 
MR. TIDDLE AND GENERAL WINK
by · 
Dominion Wide (photographer)
citation · 
page 10
content

Black and white photograph of Severin Drix and Bob Henninge (wearing police-style hat with star on it), holding squidgers on a tiddlywinks mat with winks and pot.

Two of North America's top tiddlywinkers concentrate on a shot in the final match of the continental pairs championship Sunday at Carleton University. Bob Henninge (hat and star) and Ferd Bull (not shown) of New York City, won the tournament with 62 points. Severin Drix (left) and Phil Villar of Boston came second with 50. And solidly in third with 47 points—and still top Canadian pairs—were Ottawa's own Rosie Wain and Andy Tomaszewski. Eleven teams competed in the two-day event.

collection · 
photocopy (Drix/NATwA); digital of photocopy copy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
540
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Toronto Daily Star (newspaper)
location · 
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
tw-pub-ID · 
776

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Toronto Daily Star.
published in · 
Toronto Daily Star
date · 
22 February 1969
title · 
This team pots out, squidges and squops
citation · 
page 7
summary

Photograph.

tw-ref-ID · 
2812
Toronto Telegram (newspaper)
location · 
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
tw-pub-ID · 
777

Toggle showing 2 tiddlywinks references for Toronto Telegram.
published in · 
Toronto Telegram
date · 
11 February 1971
citation · 
page 61
tw-ref-ID · 
2813
published in · 
Toronto Telegram
date · 
15 February 1971
citation · 
page 4
tw-ref-ID · 
2814
The Toronto World (newspaper)
location · 
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
tw-pub-ID · 
778

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for The Toronto World.
published in · 
The Toronto World
date · 
17 August 1920
citation · 
page 7 • column 7
content

STAR THEATRE

THIS WEEK—MATINEE DAILY.

I. H. HERK'S BIG SUCCESS

TIDDLEDY WINKS

A BURLESQUE FABLE with HARRY S. LEVAN AND 20 CLASSY WINKERS.

notability rating · 
not tiddlywinks game
tw-ref-ID · 
2816
Québec • (province)
Buckingham, Québec, Canada
The Buckingham Post (newspaper)
location · 
Buckingham, Québec, Canada
tw-pub-ID · 
533

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for The Buckingham Post.
published in · 
The Buckingham Post
date · 
15 May 1959
title · 
Tiddlywinks No Game for Sissies
citation · 
page 4 • column 3
content

"Tiddlywinks is a game for four players, those who play opposite each other being partners. The aim of the game is to flick the winks into the pot"

In the quick wake of the sceduling of the tiddlywink match between the undisputed champion of the British Isles, Cambridge University, and the University of Chicago, a number of significant reactions have been recorded in the Windy City.

For one, the university's student paper has devoted a half page of its paper to printing the international rules of tiddlywinks—from which the aforementioned definitoin of the game is taken.

At the same time, Rochelle Dubnow, editor of the paper—The Maroon—hinted at the type of unexpected opposition the Cambridge aggregation may have to face here next September.

"We find nothing in the rules that prohibits young women from taking part, Miss Dubnow said.

"Although sporting codes are customarily thrown to the winds in tiddlywinks competition," she said, "we suspect the long tradition of British gallantry toward women may prove too much for even these battle hardened veterans.

"And one show of gallantry may cost them the match."

At the same time the university's director of athletics, Walter L. Hass, scoffed at the idea that tiddlywinks is a "sissy's sport." He grimly pointed out that there were "split thumbnails, flying winks which threaten players and spectators alike." He said that "thse are the considerable hazards of the game."

collection · 
digital image (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2286
Montréal, Québec, Canada
Montréal Star (newspaper)
location · 
Montréal, Québec, Canada
tw-pub-ID · 
774

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Montréal Star.
published in · 
Montréal Star
date · 
2 October 1971
tw-ref-ID · 
2808
Ireland
Irish Independent (newspaper)
location · 
Ireland
archive website · 
tw-pub-ID · 
802

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Irish Independent.
published in · 
Irish Independent
date · 
28 February 1966
title · 
All Eyes on Tiddlywinks
title language · 
English
citation · 
volume 75 • issue 50 • page 3 • column 1
content

AND what was so interest? … a ding dong tiddlywinks competition at Trinity College, Dublin, yesterday. And battling grimity for the honours were students from Trinity and Queen's University, Belfast. First champions—Queen's, by 72 pts. to 40.

tw-ref-ID · 
3782
Cork, Ireland
The Cork Examiner (newspaper)
location · 
Cork, Ireland
archive website · 
tw-pub-ID · 
803

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for The Cork Examiner.
published in · 
The Cork Examiner
date · 
5 January 1970
title · 
Tiddlywink schoolboys totter to new record
title language · 
English
citation · 
whole 47229 • page 1 • column 3
content

EIGHT physically and mentally weary schoolboys watched a tiddlywink flip at 9.30 last night and dazedly claimed a new world record.

The boys—at the Quintin Kynaston School, Marylebone, London—had been ‘potting winks’ since New Year's Day.

As minute hands on watches passed the 9.30 p.m. mark it signified that the two teams, each made up of four boys, had broken the previous 84-hour record.

But they kept going for another hour and set the record at 85 hours.

About £199 us expected to be raised for Oxfam.

Each boy was sponsored along the same lines as charity walkers.

The boys have been kept going by crisps, sandwiches, peanuts, pies—and two giant tins of coffee donated by Oxfam.

Sanity was preserved by continual pop music and chats with a supervising master and a scorekeeper.

The players tried to get home for one decent meal a day and took turns to rest on camp beds at the school.

keywords

marathon

tw-ref-ID · 
3783
Evening Echo (newspaper)
location · 
Cork, Ireland
archive website · 
tw-pub-ID · 
804

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Evening Echo.
published in · 
Evening Echo
date · 
5 March 1958
title · 
U.S. Tiddlywink Challenge
title language · 
English
citation · 
whole 19551 • page 8 • column 5
content

An American Tiddlywinks team announced in New York last night that it had begun training for a possible match with the Duke of Edinburgh's team. The Goons.

The U.S. team, made up of members of the cast in an Ibsen play “Enemy of the People” at a Greenwich village district theatre, lamented the fact that Tiddlywinks is a vanishing art in America.

Mr. Arthur Reel, director of the play, said a notice had been sent to the Duke challenging The Goons.

keywords

Goons

challenge

tw-ref-ID · 
3784
New Zealand
Canterbury • (region)
Christchurch, Canterbury, New Zealand
The Star (newspaper)
location · 
Christchurch, Canterbury, New Zealand
tw-pub-ID · 
767

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for The Star.
published in · 
The Star
date · 
25 July 1893
citation · 
page 4
content

Miscellaneous

ANNUAL Sale.—Flipperty Flop, new popular game, same as Tiddledywinks; Six-Handed Game for 1s, at Oakey's Variety Bazaar.

notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2801
Timaru, Canterbury, New Zealand
Timaru Herald (newspaper)
location · 
Timaru, Canterbury, New Zealand
tw-pub-ID · 
768

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Timaru Herald.
published in · 
Timaru Herald
date · 
12 May 1894
citation · 
volume 57 • whole 5693 • page 1 • column 8
content

WINTER GAMES.

[...] Tiddledy Winks. ... ... 1s

[...]

T. WAGSTAFF, BOOKSELLER & STATIONER, TIMARU

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2802
Manawatu-Wanganui • (region)
Feilding, Manawatu-Wanganui, New Zealand
Feilding Star (newspaper)
location · 
Feilding, Manawatu-Wanganui, New Zealand
tw-pub-ID · 
762

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Feilding Star.
published in · 
Feilding Star
date · 
29 October 1892
column title · 
Local and General News
citation · 
volume 14 • issue 56 • page 2
content

Mr. Waugh is making a nice display of new novels, children's birthday and presentation books, parlour games, tiddledy winks, albums, birthday cards, toys etc, and invited a visit of inspection.

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2794
Wanganui, Manawatu-Wanganui, New Zealand
Wanganui Herald (newspaper)
location · 
Wanganui, Manawatu-Wanganui, New Zealand
tw-pub-ID · 
769

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Wanganui Herald.
published in · 
Wanganui Herald
date · 
2 November 1894
citation · 
page 4
content

GAMES. GAMES. GAMES.

Tiddledywinks, Halma, Flirting Cricket, Flirting Football, Stanley's March, Reversi, Pagodah [,] Endless Chain Puzzle, etc.

H. I. JONES AND SON, BOOKSELLERS AND STATIONERS, PRINTERS & BOOKBINDERS, WANGANUI

notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2803
Marlborough • (region)
Blenheim, Marlborough, New Zealand
Marlborough Express (newspaper)
location · 
Blenheim, Marlborough, New Zealand
tw-pub-ID · 
763

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Marlborough Express.
published in · 
Marlborough Express
date · 
17 June 1892
citation · 
volume 28 • issue 142 • page 2
content

MISS CARD

HAS received a New Supply of Fancy Goods and Toys, new Games, including Renersi [sic; correct= Reversi], Naval Manœvres, TIddledy-Winks, &c. [...]

MARKET STREET, NORTH

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2796
Nelson • (region)
Nelson, Nelson, New Zealand
Nelson Evening Mail (newspaper)
location · 
Nelson, Nelson, New Zealand
tw-pub-ID · 
764

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Nelson Evening Mail.
published in · 
Nelson Evening Mail
date · 
5 July 1894
citation · 
volume 28 • issue 155 • page 3
content

GAMES.—Immense variety, including Palmistry, Fortune Telling, Flirting, Tennis, Cricket, Football, Bogie Man, Chess, Halma, and Tiddledy Winks.

OAKEY'S BAZAAR.

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2797
Oceania • (region)
Auckland, Oceania, New Zealand
New Zealand Observer and Free Lance (newspaper)
location · 
Auckland, Oceania, New Zealand
tw-pub-ID · 
765

Toggle showing 4 tiddlywinks references for New Zealand Observer and Free Lance.
published in · 
New Zealand Observer and Free Lance
date · 
23 March 1895
title · 
Wanted Known
by · 
Goodson's London Arcades, Queen St. and Karangahape Road
citation · 
volume 15 • whole 847 • page 2 • column 1
content

Flitterkins, [...] Jumpkins, Tiddley Winks

collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2069
published in · 
New Zealand Observer and Free Lance
date · 
30 March 1895
title · 
Wanted Known
by · 
Goodson's London Arcades, Queen St. and Karangahape Road
citation · 
volume 15 • whole 848 • page 2 • column 1
content

Flitterkins, [...] Jumpkins, Tiddley Winks

collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2070
published in · 
New Zealand Observer and Free Lance
date · 
Paengawhāwhā 20 April 1895
title · 
Wanted Known
by · 
Goodson's London Arcades, Queen St. and Karangahape Road
citation · 
page 4 • column 1
content

Flitterkins, [...] Jumpkins, Tiddley Winks

collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
3764
published in · 
New Zealand Observer and Free Lance
date · 
13 July 1907
citation · 
volume 27 • issue 43 • page 14
content

WINTER FIRESIDE GAMES

All at 1/6, and played with a board.

Snakes and Ladders, Steeplechase, Hare and Tortoise, Hunt Cup, Lotto and Bowlette (Table Bowls).

VARIOUS GAMES.

Tiddledy Winks, 1/6; Word Making, 1/–; [...]

WILDMAN AND AREY, BOOKSELLERS, STATIONERS, AND PROPRIETORS AUCKLAND PICTURE POST CARD SHOP, VICTORIA ARCADE, SHORTLAND ST., AUCKLAND.

notes · 
The same advertisement appears on 20 July 1907 (page 14), 27 July 1907 (page 14), and 3 August 1907 (page 14).
links · 
Observer (tw-ref-link-id 1860)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2798
Otago • (region)
Dunedin, Otago, New Zealand
Otago Witness (newspaper)
location · 
Dunedin, Otago, New Zealand
tw-pub-ID · 
766

Toggle showing 2 tiddlywinks references for Otago Witness.
published in · 
Otago Witness
date · 
13 July 1893
citation · 
page 3 • column 1
content

JAQUES' GAMES.

FOR WINTER EVENINGS

AN Immense Variety—Halma, Snap, Tiddledywinks, Reversi, Kono, Pirouette. Of all the Leading Fancy Dealers Throughout the Colonies.

Published by JAQUES and SON, LONDON.

See that Goods Bear the Name or they are not Genuine.

notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2799
published in · 
Otago Witness
date · 
7 May 1903
title · 
A Year in the Orange Free State Before the War
citation · 
whole 2512 • page 50
content

To pass long evenings we used to play tiddlywinks together

notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2800
Wellington • (region)
Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand
Evening Post (newspaper)
location · 
Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand
tw-pub-ID · 
770

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Evening Post.
published in · 
Evening Post
date · 
3 October 1891
title · 
Wit and Humor
citation · 
section Supplement • page 2 • column 2
content

"Bertie," said the Queen to the Prince, "you do gamble. I have proof. Here, sir, is a poker chip I found in your pocket." "Nonsense, ma," said the Prince. "I've been playing tiddledywinks with Battenberg's babies."

notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2804
West Coast • (region)
Greymouth, West Coast, New Zealand
Grey River Argus (newspaper)
location · 
Greymouth, West Coast, New Zealand
tw-pub-ID · 
761

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Grey River Argus.
published in · 
Grey River Argus
date · 
12 June 1902
title · 
Just Landed
citation · 
volume 57 • whole 10520 • page 4
content

Ladies Bicycle fitted with the patent emergency tube, which is admitted as the greatest and most userful invention ever introduced in connection with the Bicycles; also the popular indoor games—Ping Pong, Ludo, Tiddledy Winks, Dargai, Klondike; also agent for F. Howell and Co's celebrated English pianos. Terms easy. Inspection invited. G. INGALL, Red House—ADVT.

collection · 
digitized image copy (NATwA)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2795
Rhodesia
Salisbury, Rhodesia
Salisbury Sunday Mail (newspaper)
location · 
Salisbury, Rhodesia
tw-pub-ID · 
771

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Salisbury Sunday Mail.
published in · 
Salisbury Sunday Mail
date · 
9 November 1960
summary

Article about the game, kusiko. The article appears in a women's column.

tw-ref-ID · 
2805
United Kingdom
(unknown British newspaper) (newspaper)
location · 
UK
tw-pub-ID · 
532

Toggle showing 19 tiddlywinks references for (unknown British newspaper).
published in · 
(unknown British newspaper)
date · 
(unknown date)
title · 
Replay! The Squider [sic] Flicker's Knickers Were Showing
summary

Coverage of the Northern Junior Tiddlywinks Championships

notes · 
Mentioned in the Milwaukee Journal, 25 May 1975.
tw-ref-ID · 
2825
published in · 
(unknown British newspaper)
date · 
(unknown date)
summary

Coverage of the 1st World Singles match.

tw-ref-ID · 
2830
published in · 
(unknown British newspaper)
date · 
November 1831
summary

Refers to Kidley Wink (see Notes & Queries 4th S. x 5)

tw-ref-ID · 
2280
published in · 
(unknown British newspaper)
date · 
1920 s
summary

Description of undergraduates advocating more relaxed lifestyle by playing tiddlywinks (see Guy Consterdine's On the Mat)

tw-ref-ID · 
2281
published in · 
(unknown British newspaper)
date · 
Summer 1958
summary

John Evans of Wales sending Prince (Charles) of Wales a box of winks.

notes · 
Note: appeared in several newspapers
tw-ref-ID · 
2283
published in · 
(unknown British newspaper)
date · 
March 1958
summary

Photograph of the Cambridge University Tiddlywinks Club vs. Goons match held on 1 March 1958.

content

Brian Tyler, of Christ's College, Cambridge, who attended Wellingborough Grammar School, appeals to umpire Chris Brasher as Spike Milligan is about to infringe a rule in the tiddlywinks match between Cambridge University Tiddlywinks Club and the Goons, who were appointed by the Duke of Edinburgh to represent him. In spite of the Duke's instructions to "fiddle the game", the Goons lost the match. Proceeds were for the National Playing Fields Association.

links · 
Memories of Wellingborough Grammar School – digitized image (free) (tw-ref-link-id 1530)
type · 
photograph
tw-ref-ID · 
2282
published in · 
(unknown British newspaper)
date · 
February 1959
summary

Potting speed record mentioned.

notes · 
Cited in Winking World 4, page 4.
tw-ref-ID · 
2284
published in · 
(unknown British newspaper)
date · 
1964
summary

Reports on Harry Secombe (one of the Goons) being Honorary President of ETwA

tw-ref-ID · 
2820
published in · 
(unknown British newspaper)
date · 
around 2 January 1964 to 3 January 1964
summary

6th Northern Junior Tiddlywinks Championship.

notes · 
Cited in Winking World, 5 page 1.
tw-ref-ID · 
2285
published in · 
(unknown British newspaper)
date · 
around 29 February 1964
title · 
London Men Triumph
summary

Coverage of the Bombay Bowl match.

collection · 
photocopy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2819
published in · 
(unknown British newspaper)
date · 
around 4 April 1965
summary

Coverage of the Third World Tiddlywinks Congress

notes · 
Mentioned in Winking World and ETwA's E3 publication.
tw-ref-ID · 
2821
published in · 
(unknown British newspaper)
date · 
around 21 April 1965
summary

Coverage of the England vs. Wales match.

tw-ref-ID · 
2822
published in · 
(unknown British newspaper)
date · 
around 5 January 1966
summary

Coverage of the Northern Junior Tiddlywinks Championships

notes · 
Cited in Winking World 9, page 3.
tw-ref-ID · 
2823
published in · 
(unknown British newspaper)
date · 
around 8 January 1967
summary

Coverage of the First Irish Tiddlywinks Convention

notes · 
CIted in Winking World 9, page 3.
tw-ref-ID · 
2824
published in · 
(unknown British newspaper)
date · 
around 30 December 1969 to 2 January 1970
summary

Coverage of the Northern Junior Tiddlywinks Championships at Manchester

notes · 
Cited in Winking World 16, page 7.
tw-ref-ID · 
2826
published in · 
(unknown British newspaper)
date · 
around 4 April 1971
summary

Coverage of ETwA's 1971 Tiddlywinks Congress

tw-ref-ID · 
2827
published in · 
(unknown British newspaper)
date · 
January 1972
summary

Coverage of the Northern Junior Tiddlywinks Championships

notes · 
Cited in Winking World 20, page 2.
tw-ref-ID · 
2828
published in · 
(unknown British newspaper)
date · 
1978
summary

Coverage of the 1978 American tour of England (?)

tw-ref-ID · 
2829
published in · 
(unknown British newspaper)
date · 
around 2 February 1980
summary

Coverage of the World Singles match, Jon Mapley vs. Dave Lockwood, held in Cambridge, England.

tw-ref-ID · 
2831
Reynold's News (newspaper)
location · 
UK
Notes

Sunday newspaper

tw-pub-ID · 
520

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Reynold's News.
published in · 
Reynold's News
date · 
2 March 1958
content
Afterwards Spike Milligan for the Goons protested that the umpire Chris Brasher had ignored a royal command to twist the game in their favour.
tw-ref-ID · 
2252
England
Express (newspaper)
alternate name · 
Daily Express; Sunday Express
location · 
England, UK
Notes

Sent CUTwC money in January 1955.

tw-pub-ID · 
486

Toggle showing 18 tiddlywinks references for Express.
published in · 
Express
date · 
16 November 1957
title · 
Chelsea follows the Portman girl to Paris
subtitle · 
Tiddly Challenge
by · 
William Hickey
citation · 
page 3 • column 3
content

PRINCE PHILIP has taken up arms over a criticism by Cambridge students that he ''sometimes cheats at tiddlywinks."

He is challenging the university to a "fight to the last tiddly," I learned last night.

The Prince will not take part himself in the contest, which will be held shortly at Cambridge. Instead, he has appointed the Goons to represent him—with Spike Milligan as skipper.

Confident

Milligan told me: "We shall certainly take the pants off the Light Blues. Prince Philip is expected to be there to sit in the jousting-box.

I have thrown down the gauntlet in no uncertain fashion. I bought a 17s. 9d. leather glove, real hide. It has gone by registered post to the captain of the Cambridge team." I am told Cambridge take their tiddly-winks seriously. But we shall win—with ease."

The tournament will raise money for the Prince's favourite charity, the National Playing Fields Association.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
links · 
UK Press Online – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1390)
tw-ref-ID · 
1974
published in · 
Express
date · 
21 November 1957
title · 
Jack Buchanan's money: I shall be surprised if there's very much left
subtitle · 
Up Tiddles and At 'Em
by · 
William Hickey
citation · 
page 3 • column 4
content

SO—Cambridge University tiddly-winks te am have taken up the gauntlet thrown down by Spike Milligan to a right to the last tiddly.

The match, for the National Playing Fields Association, comes in response to a conversation between Prince Philip and Milligan.

Milligan will captain the Goons—chosen as his champions by Prince Philip.

Yesterday Cambridge replied to Milligan:—

"Hear Ye. Spike Milligan. Be it known, mate, that ye Cambridge University tiddly-winks team taketh up ye gauntlet and will join battle with ye Royal Champion Goons early in the New Year."

The acceptance was signed "Earl Anundale," and the registered letter received by Milligan was tied with light blue ribbon and sealed with a light blue tiddly-wink.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
links · 
UK Press Online – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1391)
tw-ref-ID · 
1975
published in · 
Express
date · 
22 November 1957
title · 
The rich romantic life of Somerset de Chair
subtitle · 
Into Training
by · 
William Hickey
citation · 
page 3 • column 4
content

A GUARDSMAN carried a heavy case into a West End office yesterday.

Black and white illustration of a man laying on the floor and shooting a wink at a bottle of Guinness beer.

It contained two dozen bottles of Guinness and a message from Prince Philip. This read: "This should help your training diet for the contest Goons versus Cambridge University at tiddly-winks."

The recipient was Spike Milligan, who will skipper the Goons team of eight, nominated by the Prince as his champions, for the contest which will take place at Cambridge.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
links · 
UK Press Online – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1392)
tw-ref-ID · 
1976
published in · 
Express
date · 
27 February 1958
column title · 
Life in the Mirror
title · 
Dollar Debs Will Curtsy in Paris
subtitle · 
Bright Boys
by · 
John Rolls
citation · 
page 2 • column 4
content

THE Yanks at Cambridge are taking over control of "Varsity," the university's weekly newspaper. on Saturday.

JONATHAN SPENCE, the present editor, explained yesterday: "It's only for a week—we wanted an educational supplement from the American angle, so fifteen American undergraduates will take over."

They are the most intelligent and vocal people in the university."

Educational supplement? The Yanks' first assignment…. a tiddly-winks match on Saturday between a university team and the B.B.C. Goons.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
links · 
UK Press Online – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1393)
tw-ref-ID · 
1977
published in · 
Express
date · 
10 May 1958
title · 
Prince Philip gets the Order of the Boot
subtitle · 
Tiddleywinks
by · 
William Hickey
citation · 
page 3 • column 6
content

THERE'S trouble, I hear, between the men of Oxford and Cambridge all over who holds the world's tiddleywinks championship. Cambridge claimed the title after, beating the Goons, but lost a contest with Oxford yesterday.

So Oxford team captain Elliott Langford announced: "We are definitely claiming the title from Cambridge. We beat them 89 points to 87, playing to their rules during the first part of the contest, and drew 24 games each playing to our rules."

Indignant Cambridge secretary Peter Downes told me: "Oxford are beine small-minded about this. It was only an experimental game and we did not have out our strongest team."

Before the squabble the referee had said: "Tiddleywinks is extremely conducive to friendliness and develops rsportsmanship."

Apparently the teams didn't hear him.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
links · 
UK Press Online – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1395)
tw-ref-ID · 
1979
published in · 
Express
date · 
5 February 1959
title · 
Danny referees tiddly-winks
citation · 
page 4 • column 5
content

Danny Blanchflower, Tottenham Hotspur's transfer-seeking footballer, is to be, one of umpires at the first official Oxford-Cambridge tiddly-winks match at Cambridge on February 26. The match is in aid of the National Playing Fields Association.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
links · 
UK Press Online – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1396)
tw-ref-ID · 
1980
published in · 
Express
date · 
26 February 1959
title · 
Inriguing talent now being patronised by Princess Margaret
by · 
William Hickey
citation · 
page 3 • column 8
content

Cambridge University tiddlywinks team, which meets Oxford today in the first official match between the two universities, has been insured at Lloyd's. The policy: £250 a thumb.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
links · 
UK Press Online – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1398)
tw-ref-ID · 
1982
published in · 
Express
date · 
7 April 1961
column title · 
The William Hickey Page
title · 
The Duchess of Kent—and the moment when she is still Princess Marina
by · 
William Hickey
citation · 
page 3 • column 5
content

Britain's tiddly winks players now have their own anthem I learned at last night's inter-university finals between Oxford and Edinburgh In Chelsea.

It has a strongly patriotic flavour, and is sung to the tune of "Men of Harlech." Sample verse:—

  • Through this game of skill and power.
  • Britain knows her finest hour.
  • And her stronghold, shield and tower must be tiddly winks.

The composer is the former secretary-general of the Tiddly Winks Association, the Rev. E. A. Willis.

"The anthem is not all," said Undergraduate, Peter Freeman who captained the winning Oxford team." We have just applied to the blues committee at Oxford for authority to award a quarter-blue for all those who play for the university."

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
links · 
UK Press Online – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1400)
tw-ref-ID · 
1984
published in · 
Express
date · 
23 January 1962
title · 
Mystique
by · 
William Hickey
citation · 
page 3 • column 5
content

ONCE more they are squidging and squopping at Cambridge. And that means the tiddly-wink team is practising for its fourth annual match with Oxford. An extraordinary mystique seems to surround this event. Roger Hand, 22-year-old engineering student who captains this year's team, says: "We are training on carrots as an aid to eyesight and foolproof flipping." After that, who can laugh at Oxford's torpedo-boat attempt on the Boat-race?

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
links · 
UK Press Online – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1401)
tw-ref-ID · 
1985
published in · 
Express
date · 
18 February 1963
title · 
Tiddlywink flight
citation · 
page 7 • column 8
content

Eight students from University College. London, flew off yesterday to compete against an Edinburgh University team—at tiddlywinks.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
links · 
UK Press Online – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1402)
tw-ref-ID · 
1986
published in · 
Express
date · 
around 22 March 1964
summary

Reporing on the Silver Wink finals at Manchester (Winking World 6, page 1).

tw-ref-ID · 
2038
published in · 
Express
date · 
2 March 1968
summary

Reporting on the CUTwC-Goons match.

tw-ref-ID · 
2037
published in · 
Express
date · 
13 March 1969
column title · 
Books
title · 
Under fire: the gods of public schools
by · 
Peter Grosvenor
citation · 
page 15 • column 1
content

THE student protest movement, it seems, is now beginning to invade those bastions of conformity, the public schools.

The mode of protest is polite, but none the less positive. Pupils at a large public school in the Midlands rebelled against the "games cult" by holding a meeting identical to that used to confer sports colours—but the colours they awarded were for tiddleywinks.

Black and white illustration of a man with a plaid jacket sitting on the floor, holding a sign "Down with Sport", and shooting a wink into a pot.
collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
links · 
UK Press Online – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1411)
tw-ref-ID · 
1997
published in · 
Express
date · 
1978
summary

Photograph of Jon Mapley (Winking World 32, page 6).

tw-ref-ID · 
2039
published in · 
Express
date · 
3 December 1980
title · 
How to tiddle, when to wink
subtitle · 
The indoor games champion who has a weird language all of his own
by · 
Douglas Orgill
citation · 
page 9 • column 1
content

JONATHAN MAPLEY is the kind of man who's quite capable of nurdling you, boondocking your wink right off the mat, and then following up with [sic original="Carnouski" correct="Carnovsky"].

He's the British national tiddlywink champion, and—like the other devotees of this impressive game—he talks a language all his own.

"A [sic original="Carnouski" correct="Carnovsky"]?" he said when I talke to him during practice. "Well, [sic original="Carnouski" correct="Carnovsky"]is a bit of a legend among winkers. He was an American winker who put four out of six winks into the pot on his very first attempt. Never played again… said it was too easy."

Mapley—a 33-year-old chartered accountant from Withan, Essex—showed me his set of squidgers. "A squidger is the disc—plastic, bakelite, ivory—which a player uses to fire his circular winks. It's pressed down on the edge of the wink, to sent it various distances at varioius angles.

Simple

"Most winkers make their own squidgers," he said. "They're like a set of golf clubs—you like to have one for every possible shot. Each squidger must be between one and two inches in diameter."

One of the seven squidgers with which he recently won the British championship—at Southampton University was once a gaming chip. Another was an adapted button, and another a filed-down top from a drinks canister.

The remaing itddlywinks equipment is simple. There's a white felt mat, six feet by three, with a small pot in the centre. And there are four sets of six disc-like-winks, each set coloured green, yellow, red and blue.

You can win in two ways—with a series of successful squidge-offs in which you squidge all of your winks into the pot before your opponent does, or by playing your winks into a controlling position on top of your opponents winks so that he's paralysed.

This manoeuvre, a sort of winker-snooker, is called a squop.

"Each game has an umpire," said Mapley, "and no there's no winker Nastase. Mind you, one or two players are noted for hot temper.

"It can get tense if somebody gets boondocked—that's when you're squidged right off the mat. Or nurdled—that's when you're too close to the pot to do anything with your wink."

Mapley reckons there are about 500 really serious players in Britain—about 50 of them women.

They tend to belong to the brainy professions—chartered accountants, mathematicians, computer programmers. The runner-up in Mapley's championship was a lecturer in German.

Mapley himself has been playing for 19 years.

Scientific

"Of course it's more scientific now, at this level," he said. "There are shots played today that weren't dreamed of then."

Is there money in tiddlywinks?

"All, you win is a silver cup," said Mapley. "I think there's a bit of betting but it's strictly unofficial.

"Only in Britain and the United States play top tiddlywinks at the moment, but we'd welcome players from other countries.

Wait till the Chinese come with their exquisite d[...] jade squidgers and winks.

Its going to be a whole [new] squidge-off.

Photograph of Jonathan Mapley's head down close to the mat, looking up at a wink heading toward the camera, with his eyes open wide and his mouth open.
One for the pot… tiddlywinks marksman Jonathan Mapley shows his winning style.
collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
links · 
UK Press Online – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1407)
tw-ref-ID · 
1993
published in · 
Express
date · 
20 November 1984
title · 
Finger-flicking good… champs who squidge and squop!
subtitle · 
Britain loses at tiddlywinks
by · 
Colin Bell
citation · 
page 3 • column 1
content

BRITAIN was flicked out of the world tlddlywinks" championshlps with a resounding squop yesterday.

The man who did the damage was America's Larry Kahn, who used his squldger to such great eflect that he retained hls title.

Countertng Larry's challenge, was Britain's [sic original="John" correct="Jon"] Mapley, a 37-year-oId chartered accountant from Witham, Essex.

And the two of them proved, if nothing else, that the game is Britain's worst spectator sport.

The total gate tor the event was eight. And most of them were public relatlons executives, who looked as If they would have preferred 40 winks.

But the lack of a good crowd did not deter [sic original="John" correct="Jon"] and Larry, a 31-year-old oceanographlst.

It was, after all, the 1984 Helneken World Tiddlywlnks championship and they were anxious to show what their right arms were really for.

Despite the brewer's backing, the emphasis was on the wink rather than the tiddly.

Using their squidgers with deft flicks of their supple wrists the two winkers attempted to "squop" each other's winks—to cover them with their own counter, preventing their opponent from having a clear shot at the "pot."

Then they would attempt a "desquop"—a shot which released one or more winks which had been previously squopped.

The turning point came In the third and fourth of the seven games when Larry built up a commandihg lead. The championship was 'hit, for nod and a wink.

But then the referee's stopwatch knocked over the pot, and the winks, In the sixth.

"What next?" exclaimed an exasperated and obviously put-out [sic original="John" correct="Jon"] Mapley.

The answer, with a neat plastic "schllp", was another of Larry's winks in the pot, and the beginning of the end for [sic original="John" correct="Jon"].

"I'm, not bitter about it really," he said afterwards.

The Americans have always been better winkers. They've held the title now for the past 11 years.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
links · 
UK Press Online – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1410)
tw-ref-ID · 
1996
published in · 
Express
date · 
12 February 2000
citation · 
section Saturday puzzle supplement
summary

Coverage of Christine Barrie.

tw-ref-ID · 
2040
published in · 
Express
date · 
30 September 2010
title · 
Prince: Why madcap Goons beat today’s smutty comics
by · 
Elisa Roche
citation · 
page 19 • column 2
content

Charles is not the only Royal fan of The Goons. Back in 1958, students at the University of Cambridge challenged Prince Philip to a tiddlywinks match.

The Duke of Edinburgh appointed The Goons as his royal champions and they played the game on his behalf.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
links · 
UK Press Online – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1406)
tw-ref-ID · 
1990
Royal Cornwall Gazette (newspaper)
location · 
England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
489

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Royal Cornwall Gazette.
published in · 
Royal Cornwall Gazette
date · 
25 December 1830
summary

Refers to Kidley Wink.

tw-ref-ID · 
1991
Western Daily Press (newspaper)
location · 
England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
528

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Western Daily Press.
published in · 
Western Daily Press
date · 
29 December 1987
title · 
Tiddly taunt by top team
media type · 
photograph
media description

Photograph of Stew Sage

collection · 
original (CUTwC)
tw-ref-ID · 
2263
Westminster Gazette (newspaper)
location · 
England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
529

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Westminster Gazette.
published in · 
Westminster Gazette
date · 
4 January 1898
citation · 
page 2
content
Cards, tiddley-winks, and ludo are played. [...]
tw-ref-ID · 
2264
Avon • (county)
Bristol, Avon, England, United Kingdom
Bristol Mercury and Daily Post (newspaper)
location · 
Bristol, Avon, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
478

Toggle showing 2 tiddlywinks references for Bristol Mercury and Daily Post.
published in · 
Bristol Mercury and Daily Post
date · 
20 December 1890
column title · 
Our Ladies' Column
citation · 
whole 13294 • page 6 • column 2
content

Then I see that boxes are sold containing all the necessary materials for a game of "Tiddledy Winks," which is amusing enough, and consists, as most of us know, of a little round basin or cup, a number of counters, and two or four large round discs or counters, called "fliippers," for with these the little counteres are to be flipped into the basin, and those who flip in the most get the game. Just now we are all charmed with an enlarged and improved "Tiddledy Winks," introduced to us from Oxford by a certain "don," who says grave and reverend seigneurs delight in thus excercising their skill when unobserved by undergrads or scouts.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
1941
published in · 
Bristol Mercury and Daily Post
date · 
4 April 1965
tw-ref-ID · 
1942
Cambridgeshire • (county)
Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, England, United Kingdom
Cambrian Courier (newspaper)
location · 
Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
481

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Cambrian Courier.
published in · 
Cambrian Courier
date · 
11 May 1965
citation · 
page 7
tw-ref-ID · 
1945
Cambrian News (newspaper)
location · 
Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
482

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Cambrian News.
published in · 
Cambrian News
date · 
30 April 1965
tw-ref-ID · 
1946
Cambridge Chronicle (newspaper)
alternate name · 
Evening Chronicle
location · 
Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
485

Toggle showing 3 tiddlywinks references for Cambridge Chronicle.
published in · 
Cambridge Chronicle
date · 
1 January 1959
title · 
The Goon game comes north
citation · 
page 10
collection · 
original (CUTwC)
tw-ref-ID · 
1967
published in · 
Cambridge Chronicle
date · 
2 January 1959
title · 
A squop's as good as a [sic original="squinge" correct="squidge"] to Harry
citation · 
page 15
content
Black and white photograph of Peter Downes (CUTwC) and Harry Secombe (Goons).
collection · 
original (CUTwC)
tw-ref-ID · 
1968
published in · 
Cambridge Chronicle
date · 
5 January 1959
title · 
Oh, well squopped, champs!
citation · 
page 7
content
Black and white photograph of Neil Sutherland, Andrew Smith, Mr. W. Dale, Nigel Shepherd, Oliver Ludlow, and Peter Downes
collection · 
original (CUTwC)
tw-ref-ID · 
1969
Cambridge News (newspaper)
alternate name · 
Cambridge Daily News; Cambridge Evening News
location · 
Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
483

Toggle showing 15 tiddlywinks references for Cambridge News.
published in · 
Cambridge News
date · 
4 April 1946
title · 
Sports Gossip
subtitle · 
Was It a Hoax?
citation · 
page back page
notes · 
Cited in Winking World 47, page 27, and Newswink 21, page 9.
collection · 
transcript (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
1947
published in · 
Cambridge News
date · 
6 April 1946
title · 
Sports Gossip
subtitle · 
Varsity's Oldest Game
citation · 
page back page
notes · 
Cited in Winking World 47, page 28, and Newswink 21, page 9.
collection · 
transcript (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
1948
published in · 
Cambridge News
date · 
9 April 1946
title · 
Sports Gossip
subtitle · 
Tiddley-Winks Tailpiece
citation · 
page back page
collection · 
transcript (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
1949
published in · 
Cambridge News
date · 
March 1955
by · 
Nuala Stanley
summary

About CUTwC sherry party.

content

This Club aims at creating history for this much-neglected yet skilful game, a game which requires self-control, dexterity, and a keen sense of direction. It is a new venture and it will be difficult to find opponents

notes · 
Cited in Winking World 7, page 6, and in Guy Consterdine's On the Mat.
tw-ref-ID · 
1950
published in · 
Cambridge News
date · 
3 October 1972
citation · 
section Freshman Supplement • page v
content
Photograph.
collection · 
original (CUTwC)
tw-ref-ID · 
1951
published in · 
Cambridge News
date · 
26 November 1985
title · 
Brit outwinks Yank to become best on planet
citation · 
page 18-19
collection · 
original (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
1952
published in · 
Cambridge News
date · 
30 October 1987
title · 
They're tiddly champs
citation · 
section Night Final
collection · 
original (CUTwC)
tw-ref-ID · 
1953
published in · 
Cambridge News
date · 
18 February 1988
title · 
Counter attack thrashes Oxford
collection · 
original (CUTwC)
tw-ref-ID · 
1954
published in · 
Cambridge News
date · 
26 October 1999
summary

About World Single 51.

tw-ref-ID · 
1955
published in · 
Cambridge News
date · 
6 March 2002
title · 
Tiddlywink showdown
summary

After the death of Spike Milligan

content

Local historian Mike Petty takes a look at a celebrated day of reckoning in Cambridge with protagonists fuelled by Babycham and Guiness University 'winkers' in action THE headlines last week were dominated by the news of the death of Spike Milligan, the last of the Goons, and the tribute paid to him by one of his greatest fans, Prince Charles. Then came the furore caused by a flippant remark in Australia about Aborigines by Prince Philip, who is among other things Chancellor of Cambridge University. But there is a connection between the university, the Prince and the Goons that seems so far to have gone unrecorded and it concerns the ancient sport of tiddlywinks The pastime was first patented in London in 1888. It essentially consists of teams competing to squidge winks into a pot, players take turns and the first one to get them all in wins. Not much to it, you might think. But then in 1955 great academic brains did begin to think about the technicalities and at Cambridge University a group of undergraduates got together to form a club for the sole purpose of playing tiddlywinks. It was the first in history but being the first they had great difficulty in finding other groups to play against.

tw-ref-ID · 
1956
published in · 
Cambridge News
date · 
25 October 2002
title · 
The tiddly champs
citation · 
page 1
summary

Report that Patrick Barrie and Ed Wynn are the tiddly wink world pairs winners.

tw-ref-ID · 
1957
published in · 
Cambridge News
date · 
21 October 2004
title · 
World-class winkers to 'squidge-off' in title fight
citation · 
edition online
content

TIDDLYWINKS champions will squidge off in an attempt to score the most tiddlies in Cambridge this weekend.

The city responsible for bringing the game out of the nursery and turning it into a "serious" sport will host the tiddlywinks national singles championship on Saturday and Sunday.

American Larry Kahn will be defending his world title in face of fierce opposition from Britain's Andy Purvis in the world singles match tomorrow, before the country's best players battle it out over the following two days.

January is the 50th anniversary of modern tiddlywinks. Although the first patent for the game was taken out in [sic original="1879" correct="1888"], today's version was invented by Cambridge University students Bill Steen and Rick Martin in January 1955.

The students wanted to play a game at which they could represent the university in a Varsity Match against Oxford, explained Charles Relle, from the English Tiddlywinks Association.

"In those days people thought that you had to have a degree and a Cambridge Blue at some sport and Bill Steen thought he was hopeless at all games so he thought he'd invent one of his own," he said.

The Cambridge University Tiddlywinks Club was formed and took off—at its peak it had more than 200 paid-up members.

"Many take it up as a joke and find they like the company and that it's a worthwhile game," said Mr Relle, who started playing when he was a student at Trinity.

"A lot of us play bridge or chess or Go and we just find tiddlywinks rather more relaxing! It is meant to be sociable and it is meant to be fun."

He said players were mostly university teachers, students, computer professionals, accountants, and people with a maths or science background.

Sadly the numbers belonging to the Cambridge University Tiddlywinks Club have dwindled to about 25 today.

"It was most popular during the 60s, less so now, I think, because it is students who tend to get into it and they are all burdened with debt and can't travel for matches," said Mr Relle.

* Anyone wishing to watch the championships can do so at the Bowett Room, Queens' College, Cambridge, on Saturday from 10.15am-6pm and Sunday from 12.15-6pm.

Color photograph of Larry Kahn pointing to a pile with his little finger.
Game on: World champ Larry Kahn
collection · 
digital web page (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
1958
published in · 
Cambridge News
date · 
23 October 2004
title · 
Andy crowned world tiddlywink champ
citation · 
edition online
content

BRITAIN has taken the world title in singles tiddlywinks.

Brit Andy Purvis went head to head against American Larry [sic original="Khan" correct="Kahn"] who was defending his world title. Andy won by 30 and a third to 11 and two thirds.

Yesterday's big match, staged at Queens' College, Cambridge, was played before the country's best players battle it out in the national singles championships this weekend.

Andy, a lecturer at Imperial College London, became hooked on the game almost 20 years ago as a student at Cambridge University, where today's version was invented.

"It's a brilliant game which deserves to be taken seriously. It is complex and quite creative. There is a lot of strategy but it is not frustrating like chess because you can recover from mistakes, or like professional snooker which is impossible for a mortal to play," said a triumphant Andy.

Larry [sic original="Khan" correct="Kahn"] has also been playing for 20 years but unlike his British opponent, spends at least an hour a day practising in the run up to a big game.

"If I don't practise there's no point in me playing," said Larry. "I want to show up and play well but I always really enjoy it." Many serious players, like Larry, have their own squidgers, which vary for different shots. Larry makes his own. "It is a bit like golf, you have different clubs for different shots," he said.

* January is the 50th anniversary of modern tiddlywinks, invented by Cambridge University students Bill Steen and Rick Martin.

collection · 
digital web page (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
1959
published in · 
Cambridge News
date · 
15 January 2005
title · 
Game on for world match
citation · 
edition online
content

TWO teams battled it out in Cambridge to celebrate the 50th anniversary of tiddlywinks.

England took on the United States at Queens' College, Cambridge, yesterday in a match involving some of the world's top players.

And the home team emerged as the clear winners by a resounding margin of 149 2/3 to 74 1/3.

Patrick Barrie, England team captain, said: "It is a tremendous performance for the England team to win by such a margin."

The match, held in the Bowett Room of the college, was part of a week-long series of matches organised to mark the anniversary of a sport invented in Cambridge.

Two former Queens' College students, Bill Steen and Rick Martin, invented the modern game in 1955 when they decided they needed a game they could beat Oxford University at.

Stewart Sage, senior treasurer of Cambridge University Tiddlywinks Club, said: "The international matches are like the Ryder Cup in golf.

"They are a mixture of singles and pairs and they are quite rare because they are between teams of eight.

"The public often don't understand it, which is a problem because they mostly associate it with the children's game. They don't appreciate that it is a very complex game.

"It is a tactical and strategic game as well as a game of skill. The children's game is simply about putting the wink into the pot whereas the adult game is much more serious than that."

The international match is the first since 1985 and although American winkers are regularly in Britain to play in tournaments, a team game is very rare.

The National Pairs Championship and World Masters were decided earlier this week and today the Cambridge Open Tournament was being held at Fitzpatrick Hall, Queens' College.

The light-hearted tournament is open to everyone, with partners and opponents drawn at random.

collection · 
digital web page (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
1960
published in · 
Cambridge News
date · 
3 March 2008
title · 
Savages are tamed in Goons match rerun
by · 
Aaron Castell
citation · 
edition online
content

ROYAL champions clashed winks with students once again in honour of when the Goons took on Cambridge University 50 years ago.

Back in 1958, the fledgling Cambridge University Tiddlywinks Club challenged the Duke of Edinburgh to scotch rumours he cheated at tiddlywinks and invited him to nominate champions in his stead if he was unwilling to play.

Those champions were the Goons - Spike Milligan, Peter Sellars [sic correct=Sellers] and Harry Secombe.

Bill Steen, Lawford Howells, Graham Ridge, David Moreton and Peter Downes. They lost but the match inspired an episode of the Goon Show in which Ned Seagoon challenges the tiddlywinks club to a leaping contest in revenge for their defeat.

Bill Steen and Lawford Howells, founder members of the club, were at Emmanuel College for the anniversary match along with Graham Ridge, David Moreton and Peter Downes from the original 1958 team.

Bill said: "There have been a lot of surprises in my life and one is to come back to Cambridge after 40 years and find there is still a club here and it is still thriving."

He described the match against the Goons as "one of the most extraordinary events in my life".

The club challenged Prince Philip after spotting an article in The Spectator entitled Does Prince Philip cheat at tiddlywinks?

Recalling how the original match in the Guildhall came about, Lawford said: "We wrote a letter to the Duke that night.

"We regretted there was some doubt as to his integrity in playing the noble sport of tiddlywinks and we offered the services of our club to help him scotch the rumour once and for all by playing a match with us.

"We also said royalty in the past used to appoint champions to represent them if they didn't want to do whatever it was themselves, and if he wished to appoint champions, we would be happy to play them."

They knew the challenge had been accepted when they received a left- handed leather gauntlet through the post with a letter from Spike Milligan.

As the Goons have since met their demise, new champions had to be appointed for Saturday's match.

This time, Prince Philip sent ambassadors in the form of four members of London's Savage Club, of which he is a member - the gentlemen's club was founded in 1857 "in the pursuit of happiness".

The Cambridge team came out the happiest, winning the match 24-18.

Sarah Knight, captain and ex-president of the club, said: "It's really exciting to be able to recreate such an historic event."

Craig Barrett, captaining the Savage Club team, said: "We don't have a lot to live up to, after the Goons also lost pretty badly."

Color photograph of five early Cambridge University Tiddlywinks Club winkers.
collection · 
digital web page (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
1961
County Durham • (county)
Darlington, County Durham, England, United Kingdom
Northern Echo (newspaper)
location · 
Darlington, County Durham, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
490

Toggle showing 3 tiddlywinks references for Northern Echo.
published in · 
Northern Echo
date · 
28 December 1891
by · 
North of England School Furnishing Company, Limited
citation · 
whole 6812 • page 1 • column 3
summary

Flitterkins listed in advertisement.

content

CHRISTMAS GAMES.—Tiddlediwinks, Ludo, Jack o' Rinks, Chop Sticks, Halma, Flitterkins, Pliffkins, Bumblepuppy, Skipit, Ducdame, Solitaire, Patches, Dominoes, Draughts, and others—all 1s each.

collection · 
digitial image (NATwA)
links · 
British Newspaper Archive – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1412)
tw-ref-ID · 
1992
published in · 
Northern Echo
date · 
30 December 1891
citation · 
whole 6814
summary

Flitterkins listed in advertisement.

content

CHRISTMAS GAMES.—Tiddlediwinks, Ludo, Jack o' Rinks, Chop Sticks, Halma, Flitterkins, Pliffkins, Bumblepuppy, Skipit, Ducdame, Solitaire, Patches, Dominoes, Draughts, and others—all 1s each.

links · 
British Newspaper Archive – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1413)
tw-ref-ID · 
1998
published in · 
Northern Echo
date · 
31 December 1891
citation · 
whole 6815
summary

Flitterkins listed in advertisement.

content

CHRISTMAS GAMES.—Tiddlediwinks, Ludo, Jack o' Rinks, Chop Sticks, Halma, Flitterkins, Pliffkins, Bumblepuppy, Skipit, Ducdame, Solitaire, Patches, Dominoes, Draughts, and others—all 1s each.

links · 
British Newspaper Archive – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1414)
tw-ref-ID · 
1999
Greater Manchester • (county)
Manchester, Greater Manchester, England, United Kingdom
The Guardian (newspaper)
alternate name · 
The Manchester Guardian
location · 
Manchester, Greater Manchester, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
513

Toggle showing 22 tiddlywinks references for The Guardian.
published in · 
The Guardian
date · 
21 December 1929
title · 
Table Games
citation · 
page 8
content
It must be many years since somebody conceived the idea of amusing people by inducing them to flick a small counter into a little jar with the edge of a bigger one. This game, called "tiddledy-winks," proved very popular, and every year since it was first introduced, has reappeared in another form. This season "tiddledywinks" is played on a board marked like a tennis court. [...]
collection · 
digital copy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2217
published in · 
The Guardian
date · 
8 May 1933
title · 
A Game of Tiddly-winks
citation · 
page 18
tw-ref-ID · 
2218
published in · 
The Guardian
date · 
14 February 1956
by · 
David Low
content
Low returns from the jungle. [Ostrich carrying tiddlywinks set and sign on back] Jubilee Tiddlywinks Tournament
type · 
comic
tw-ref-ID · 
2219
published in · 
The Guardian
date · 
3 March 1958
title · 
Duke Pulls Muscle in Winking Finger
subtitle · 
His team is tiddlied
citation · 
page 4
tw-ref-ID · 
2220
published in · 
The Guardian
date · 
10 March 1958
title · 
Oxford Claims Championship
subtitle · 
Or was it a friendly game?
citation · 
page 1
tw-ref-ID · 
2221
published in · 
The Guardian
date · 
14 May 1958
column title · 
Miscellany
title · 
Tiddlywinks
citation · 
page 4
tw-ref-ID · 
2222
published in · 
The Guardian
date · 
13 June 1958
title · 
Tiddly Winkers in Congress
subtitle · 
Successful Outcome
citation · 
page 5
tw-ref-ID · 
2223
published in · 
The Guardian
date · 
5 January 1961
title · 
Tiddlywinks Tycoon
citation · 
page 17
tw-ref-ID · 
2224
published in · 
The Guardian
date · 
24 January 1964
title · 
Just 'winks' now
citation · 
page 4
collection · 
digital copy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2225
published in · 
The Guardian
date · 
24 November 1980
title · 
Double Triumph for the Witham Winker
citation · 
page 1
summary

About Jon Mapley in the English National Singles.

tw-ref-ID · 
2226
published in · 
The Guardian
date · 
31 December 1987
title · 
New pub hosts new contest
citation · 
edition Somerset & Avon
collection · 
original (CUTwC)
tw-ref-ID · 
2227
published in · 
The Guardian
date · 
17 February 1988
title · 
How Robin Hood won a college place
collection · 
original (CUTwC)
tw-ref-ID · 
2228
published in · 
The Guardian
date · 
after 17 February 1988
summary

Letter in reply to 17 February 1988 article.

tw-ref-ID · 
2229
published in · 
The Guardian
date · 
7 January 1997
citation · 
section 2
summary

Regarding Christine Barrie as the first female ETwA Chairman.

tw-ref-ID · 
2230
published in · 
The Guardian
date · 
19 February 2003
title · 
The world wakes up to Tiddleywink
by · 
John Exard
citation · 
edition web
summary

About the hamlet in Wiltshire called Tiddleywink.

content
The name's origin goes back to the use of the word for the children's game, nowadays spelt tiddlywinks, as rhyming slang for "drinks". The word evolved into slang for a small beershop, according to the Oxford English Dictionary.
collection · 
digital copy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2231
published in · 
The Guardian
date · 
25 October 2004
column title · 
Pass Notes No. 2,529
title · 
Tiddlywinks
citation · 
edition web
content
I was referring to the really interesting clash last week, when our very own Andy "Mad Dog" Purvis beat legendary American Larry Kahn to win the world tiddlywinks championships.
collection · 
digital copy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2232
published in · 
The Guardian
date · 
28 October 2004
column title · 
Letters
by · 
David Turner
citation · 
edition web
content

Cambridge University Tiddlywinks Club may have been founded in 1954, but King's College played Newnham 10 years earlier (Pass Notes, G2, October 26). King's lost. I know, because I had to engrave the King's College crest on the commemorative wink they were presented with.

David Turner

Derby

collection · 
digital copy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2233
published in · 
The Guardian
date · 
30 April 2005
title · 
We love each other
subtitle · 
Patrick & Christine Barrie
by · 
Craig Taylor
citation · 
edition web
content

Patrick We met at a tiddlywinks tournament. It's very strategic, tactical, not just flicking plastic discs around. It's tense—some matches depend on the very last shot. Now we have a two-year-old son, there might some day be another tiddlywinks player in the family. We'll get him started on easier games like bridge and chess.

Christine He is a great partner to play with. I was a good potter, which means I was good at getting the winks in the pot. But he's good at everything—squops, potting, strategy, boondocking—and he has such concentration. He knows exactly which move to play, and he practises after dinner. We won the National US Pairs in 1998. We make a good team.

collection · 
digital copy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2234
published in · 
The Guardian
date · 
16 November 2006
column title · 
Diary
by · 
Jon Henley
citation · 
edition web
content
let us applaud the very real initiative of Scottish Water, which according to the Scotsman has urged all 6,000 of its employees to mark World Toilet Day on November 19 by playing amusing new versions of those popular traditional games tiddlywinks and hoopla, renamed (we promise) turdlywinks and poopla for the occasion
collection · 
digital copy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2235
published in · 
The Guardian
date · 
28 April 2007
title · 
If I had the time ...
subtitle · 
Things to do with your family this week
by · 
Juliet Rix
citation · 
edition web
content

Squop, scrunge and wink

Juliet Rix

My family has just rediscovered tiddlywinks. I'm not sure why sending little coloured discs of plastic plinking into a pot - or not as the case may often be - is quite so amusing, but it is.

Tiddlywinks goes back to Victorian times (patented as Tiddledy Winks in 1888) but the modern game began with some unathletic 1950s Cambridge undergraduates in search of a sport at which they could represent the university. The official game (yes, there are national and international tournaments!) is played on a felt mat 1.8m by 0.9m with a pot in the middle and base lines at each corner. There are four colours (blue, green, red and yellow) and you can play in pairs or singles. The idea is to use a squidger (large plastic disc) to flick winks (small plastic discs) into the pot, or to squop - ie wreck your opponents chances by landing your wink on top of his.

We play obstacle tiddlywinks, where glasses, books, mobile phones or whatever else happens to be on the kitchen table stays put and we have to flick our winks over or round them. We are very good at the scrunge (where the wink bounces out of the pot) but haven't quite worked out the boondock!

The national tiddlywinks pairs championship is on April 28-29 at Selwyn College, Cambridge. The English Tiddlywinks Association: etwa.org

collection · 
digital copy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2236
published in · 
The Guardian
date · 
29 October 2007
title · 
Stephen Bicknell
subtitle · 
Author of a history of English organs who also designed, built and restored them
citation · 
edition web
content
At Durham his eccentricity was expressed in his organisation of tiddlywinks competitions across the city's bridges.
tw-ref-ID · 
2237
published in · 
The Guardian
date · 
23 July 2009
title · 
Stella McCartney resurrects Bambi
by · 
Rachel Holmes
citation · 
edition web
content
The Lady Luck Rules Ok girls will be there, and have designed a giant game of tiddlywinks for everyone to play. It combines kittens and rock'n'roll, but we don't want to give away any more ...
tw-ref-ID · 
2238
Manchester Evening News (newspaper)
location · 
Manchester, Greater Manchester, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
512

Toggle showing 2 tiddlywinks references for Manchester Evening News.
published in · 
Manchester Evening News
date · 
31 May 1980
title · 
Tiddlywinks ace Pam scoops title
notes · 
A photocopy appears in Winking World 36, page 1.
collection · 
photocopy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2215
published in · 
Manchester Evening News
date · 
~ 4 July 1981
summary

Coverage of the Manchester Open tournament.

tw-ref-ID · 
2216
Manchester Guardian Weekly (newspaper)
location · 
Manchester, Greater Manchester, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
514

Toggle showing 2 tiddlywinks references for Manchester Guardian Weekly.
published in · 
Manchester Guardian Weekly
date · 
19 May 1958
title · 
Tiddlywinks
summary

Reprint of the article that appeard in the Manchester Guardian, 14 May 1958.

collection · 
transcript (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2239
published in · 
Manchester Guardian Weekly
date · 
5 April 1981
title · 
A savoury dose of utopiate
subtitle · 
CITIES OF THE RED NIGHT, by William S. Burroughs
citation · 
page 21
collection · 
excerpt (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2241
Manchester Times (newspaper)
location · 
Manchester, Greater Manchester, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
515

Toggle showing 3 tiddlywinks references for Manchester Times.
published in · 
Manchester Times
date · 
14 December 1889
citation · 
issue 1690 • page 1
summary

Spoof, Tiddledy Winks, Flitterkins, etc. in an advertisement

collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2240
published in · 
Manchester Times
date · 
21 December 1889
citation · 
issue 1691
summary

Tiddledy Winks, Flitterkins, etc. in an advertisement.

tw-ref-ID · 
2242
published in · 
Manchester Times
date · 
19 December 1890
citation · 
issue 1742 • page 1 • column 6
content
GAMES - KENDAL, MILNE, & CO. are now Showing NEW GAMES from all the leading Makers. All Shilling Games, including Spoof, Golf, Croquet, Cup Spoof, Ring Spoof, Tiddledy Winks, &c. &c. at 9 1/2d.
collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2243
Stockport, Greater Manchester, England, United Kingdom
(some Stockport newspaper) (newspaper)
location · 
Stockport, Greater Manchester, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
523

Toggle showing 2 tiddlywinks references for (some Stockport newspaper).
published in · 
(some Stockport newspaper)
date · 
late 1959
notes · 
Article mentioned in Winking World 4, page 7.
tw-ref-ID · 
2255
published in · 
(some Stockport newspaper)
date · 
late 1963 January 1964
notes · 
Article mentioned in Winking World 5, page 8.
tw-ref-ID · 
2256
Hampshire • (county)
Portsmouth, Hampshire, England, United Kingdom
Hampshire Telegraph and Sussex Chronicle etc.  (newspaper)
location · 
Portsmouth, Hampshire, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
493

Toggle showing 3 tiddlywinks references for Hampshire Telegraph and Sussex Chronicle etc. .
published in · 
Hampshire Telegraph and Sussex Chronicle etc.
date · 
24 October 1891
citation · 
whole 5746 • column 3
content

T. E. BOX & CO., COMMERCIAL AND FANCY STATIONERS, PRINTERS, BOOKBINDERS, &c.

PLAYING CARDS FROM 8d. PER PACK. BEZIQUE, CHESS, DOMINOES, DRAUGHTS, HALMA, TIDDLEY-WINKS, REVERSI, KHAN-LOO, And all the Newest Games for Indoor Amusement.

collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2002
published in · 
Hampshire Telegraph and Sussex Chronicle etc.
date · 
14 November 1891
citation · 
whole 5749
content

T. E. BOX & CO., COMMERCIAL AND FANCY STATIONERS, PRINTERS, BOOKBINDERS, &c.

PLAYING CARDS FROM 8d. PER PACK. BEZIQUE, CHESS, DOMINOES, DRAUGHTS, HALMA, TIDDLEY-WINKS, REVERSI, KHAN-LOO, And all the Newest Games for Indoor Amusement.

tw-ref-ID · 
2004
published in · 
Hampshire Telegraph and Sussex Chronicle etc.
date · 
21 November 1891
citation · 
whole 5750
content

T. E. BOX & CO., COMMERCIAL AND FANCY STATIONERS, PRINTERS, BOOKBINDERS, &c.

PLAYING CARDS FROM 8d. PER PACK. BEZIQUE, CHESS, DOMINOES, DRAUGHTS, HALMA, TIDDLEY-WINKS, REVERSI, KHAN-LOO, And all the Newest Games for Indoor Amusement.

tw-ref-ID · 
2003
Southampton, Hampshire, England, United Kingdom
Southern Echo (newspaper)
alternate name · 
Southern Evening Echo
location · 
Southampton, Hampshire, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
175

Toggle showing 3 tiddlywinks references for Southern Echo.
published in · 
Southern Echo
date · 
29 March 1972
title · 
British `tiddling' could sink America
citation · 
page 15
tw-ref-ID · 
2248
published in · 
Southern Echo
date · 
25 June 1973
citation · 
page 3
tw-ref-ID · 
2249
published in · 
Southern Echo
date · 
18 July 1978
title · 
`Winking' Title Goes West
citation · 
page 11
media type · 
photograph
collection · 
photocopy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2250
Isle of Wight • (county)
Ventnor, Isle of Wight, England, United Kingdom
VentnorBlog - Isle of Wight News (newspaper)
location · 
Ventnor, Isle of Wight, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
496

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for VentnorBlog - Isle of Wight News.
published in · 
VentnorBlog - Isle of Wight News
date · 
31 August 2010
title · 
RAPANUI SPONSORS UK TIDDLYWINKS WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP TEA
citation · 
edition online
content

USA 2010 World Championship bid made possible for England team by an Isle of Wight business.

Isle of Wight Eco-clothing company, Rapanui, have sponsored the England team heading to the World Tiddlywinks championship.

Rapanui Sponsors UK Tiddlywinks World Championsip Team

Rather than sponsoring the over-glossy world of some sports, the boys behind Rapanui, Rob and Martin Drake-Knight, decided to get more real about it.

Color photograph of Patrick Barrie (blue shirt made by Rapanui, along with the logo of a stylized liion pushing a pot over (both in blue) with a red cross on a wink heading into the pot, with "ENGLAND" (white on a blue rectangle).

They say they wanted to, “find honest, real people who are passionate about their sport in a way that reflects an honest approach business, the environment and life.”

Boffins galore

The brothers found Dr Patrick Barrie, a Chemical Engineer from Cambridge University and multiple Tiddlywinks world champion, then recruited the rest of the English Tiddlywinks national squad, who happen to be some of our country’s brightest scientific minds.

Along with Dr Stew Sage, Patrick worked with Rapanui to develop some cutting-edge performance eco-wear for the tournament, design a new logo and tactical formation.

The England team flew out to America for the world championships in the USA this week.

Last match a “comfortable win”

The last tournament, in 2005, ended with a comfortable win over the Americans by the England team, and it’s likely that the World-tiddly-trophy will be returning to England in the hands of some eco-textiles wearing Englishmen soon.

Rob Drake-Knight said, “They’ve won more times than they’ve lost – this makes them the most successful England team in all international sport.”

US vs UK – “Classic grudge match”

Multiple world champion and Rapanui ambassador, Dr Patrick Barrie, explains the feeling in the English camp, “England vs US is a classic grudge match. It’s the oldest rivalry in tiddlywinks history and we’re all excited to fly the flag for England – I would cross my fingers but we can’t risk an injury.”

Illustration charting out the members of the England Tiddlywinks Team and their specialties.
links · 
Archive.org - VentnorBlog – web page (free) (tw-ref-link-id 1427)
tw-ref-ID · 
2017
Lancashire • (county)
Preston, Lancashire, England, United Kingdom
The Preston Chronicle and Lancashire Advertiser (newspaper)
location · 
Preston, Lancashire, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
517

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for The Preston Chronicle and Lancashire Advertiser.
published in · 
The Preston Chronicle and Lancashire Advertiser
date · 
20 December 1890
column title · 
OUR LADIES' COLUMN.
title · 
AMUSING GAMES. - A GAME FROM OXFORD. - TIDDLEDY WINKS.
by · 
ONE OF THEMSELVES
citation · 
issue 4052 • page 7 • column 4
content
Then I see that boxes are sold containing all the necessary materials for a game of "Tiddledy Winks," which is amusing enough, and consists, as most of us know, of a little round basin or cup, a number of counters, and two or four large round discs or counters, called "fliippers," for with these the little counters are to be flipped into the basin, and those who flip in the most get the game. Just now we are all charmed with an enlarged and improved "Tiddledy Winks," introduced to us from Oxford by a certain "don," who says grave and reverend seigneurs delight in thus excercising their skill when unobserved by undergrads or scouts.
collection · 
Digitized image (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2246
London • (county)
London, London, England, United Kingdom
The Church Times (newspaper)
location · 
London, London, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
487

Toggle showing 2 tiddlywinks references for The Church Times.
published in · 
The Church Times
date · 
2 December 1898
title · 
Dean's Plays
by · 
Dean and Son, Limited
citation · 
page 662 • column 3
content

PARLOUR GAMES. By F. G. Green.

An entirely new book for Winter evenings, The Games dealt with include Halma, Chivalry, Race Games, Campaigning, Ludo, Checkmate, Tiddledy-Winks, Colorito, Reversi, Go-Bang, Khanhoo, Penchant, etc., etc.

London: DEAN and SON, Limited, 160a, Fleet-street, E.C.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
links · 
UK Press Online – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1386)
tw-ref-ID · 
1971
published in · 
The Church Times
date · 
16 December 1898
title · 
Dean's Plays
by · 
Dean and Son, Limited
citation · 
page 735 • column 2
content

PARLOUR GAMES. By F. G. Green.

An entirely new book for Winter evenings, The Games dealt with include Halma, Chivalry, Race Games, Campaigning, Ludo, Checkmate, Tiddledy-Winks, Colorito, Reversi, Go-Bang, Khanhoo, Penchant, etc., etc.

London: DEAN and SON, Limited, 160a, Fleet-street, E.C.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
links · 
UK Press Online – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1387)
tw-ref-ID · 
1972
Daily Mail (newspaper)
location · 
London, London, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
501

Toggle showing 5 tiddlywinks references for Daily Mail.
published in · 
Daily Mail
date · 
5 March 1958
title · 
More Goonery?
by · 
Paul Tanfield
citation · 
whole 19244 • page 16 • column 2
content

Despite their defeat at Cambridge last week, I hear that the Goons, official tiddlywinks champions of Prince Phillip, may have another match on their hands… with an American team

Members of a New York stage play, lamenting the fact that tiddlywinks is a vanishing art in America, have begun training, and a challenge has been sent to the Prince and the Goons.

The U.S. coach, Arthur Reel, said one of his team has developed a grid-table which makes it possible to measure where a wink falls.

This information can be transmitted accurately by telephone or cable.

"It's as easy as reading a map," he said.

The way I imagine the Goons would read a map, Mr. Reel, doesn't make it quite so simple.

collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2024
published in · 
Daily Mail
date · 
23 March 1959
title · 
Bobo Finds the General a First-Class Winker
citation · 
page 14 • column 5
content
Black and white photograph.
General Sir Hugh Stockwell pots his wink watched by Bobo Sigrist and Lord Valentine Thynne

Pale and nervous by the decision she must face, Bobo Sigrist sought my advice: "Should I squop with my squidger?"

"I should pot if I were you," I said. "The general is too good at winking."

It was all very serious—this practice session for the world tiddlywinks championship.

Prince Phillip's team were in training for tomorrow's game against Cambridge University, who, need I say, are already champions of the universe.

General Sir Hugh Stockwell, captain of the Prince's team, marshalled his men in the Empress Club yesterday for a final practice.

"I brought my own winks," he said. "They're loaded."

Lord Strathcarron was there. So was 21-year old Lord Valentine Thynne, who said: "The last time I played was with my nursemaid. I think I won."

Terry-Thomas, very properly, was serious about the whole business, and film producer Kevin McClory arrived. with Bobo Sigrist.

This was an event not strictly on the schedule because tiddlywinks, as played under international rules tomorrow, will be a strictly stag affair.

Bobo and I were roped in because three of the eight-man team could not make it.

* To squop—to cover up an opponent's wink. Squidging—the action of firing the wink towards the pot.

collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2025
published in · 
Daily Mail
date · 
3 March 1960
column title · 
Far and Near
title · 
The girl who 'winks' best
citation · 
page 9 • column 8
content

Twenty-year-old Mary Otto, of St. Hilda's College, is the only woman in the undefeated Oxford University tiddlywink first team which meets Cambridge University in the all-England championship at Oxford today.

Captain of the winks Rodney Sutton, of Hertford College, said: "We have strict equality of the sexes in tiddlywinks. Mary has won her place on merit. She is a very sensitive winker.

collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2026
published in · 
Daily Mail
date · 
2 June 1980
summary

Quote from Pam Knowles (cited in Winking World 36, page 1)

collection · 
photocopy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2027
published in · 
Daily Mail
date · 
6 January 1997
citation · 
page 24
summary

About Christine Barrie being the first female ETwA Chairman

tw-ref-ID · 
2028
The Daily News (newspaper)
location · 
London, London, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
502

Toggle showing 6 tiddlywinks references for The Daily News.
published in · 
The Daily News
date · 
13 October 1890
by · 
J. Jaques and Son
citation · 
whole 13891 • page 4 • column 2
content

NOW READY, NEW EDITION.

AQUES and SON'S LIST of NEW GAMES.

JUST PUBLISHED.

Ducdamé, Corkitts, Halma, Pliffkins, Bumble Puppy, Flitter- kins, Reversi. Patchesi, and Tiddledy Winks, 1s., 2s. 6d., 5s., and up. Chopsticks, 3s. 6d., 5s.; and many others. May be seen at all Fancy Dealers'.

London: Jaques and Son, 102, Hatton-garden.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
links · 
British Newspaper Archive – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1435)
tw-ref-ID · 
2029
published in · 
The Daily News
date · 
24 October 1890
by · 
J. Jaques and Son
citation · 
page 4 • column 1
content

NOW READY, NEW EDITION.

AQUES and SON'S LIST of NEW GAMES.

JUST PUBLISHED.

Ducdamé, Corkitts, Halma, Pliffkins, Bumble Puppy, Flitter- kins, Reversi. Patchesi, and Tiddledy Winks, 1s., 2s. 6d., 5s., and up. Chopsticks, 3s. 6d., 5s.; and many others. May be seen at all Fancy Dealers'.

London: Jaques and Son, 102, Hatton-garden.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
links · 
British Newspaper Archive – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1436)
tw-ref-ID · 
2030
published in · 
The Daily News
date · 
28 October 1891
title · 
New Games
by · 
J. Jaques and Son
citation · 
whole 14217 • page 1 • column 6
content

NEW GAMES. JAQUES and SON'S CATALOGUE post free. Ducdamé, Corkitta, Bumble Puppy, Pliffkins, Halma, Tiddledy Winks, Flitterkins, Reversi, Patchesi, &c. From 1s. upwards. Of all dealers.-JAQUES and SON, Hatton-garden,

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
links · 
British Newspaper Archive – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1437)
tw-ref-ID · 
2031
published in · 
The Daily News
date · 
31 October 1891
title · 
New Games
by · 
J. Jaques and Son
citation · 
whole 14220 • page 7
content

NEW GAMES. JAQUES and SON'S CATALOGUE post free. Ducdamé, Corkitta, Bumble Puppy, Pliffkins, Halma, Tiddledy Winks, Flitterkins, Reversi, Patchesi, &c. From 1s. upwards. Of all dealers.-JAQUES and SON, Hatton-garden,

links · 
British Newspaper Archive – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1438)
tw-ref-ID · 
2032
published in · 
The Daily News
date · 
11 November 1891
title · 
New Games
by · 
J. Jaques and Son
citation · 
whole 14429 • page 1
content

NEW GAMES. JAQUES and SON'S CATALOGUE post free. Ducdamé, Corkitta, Bumble Puppy, Pliffkins, Halma, Tiddledy Winks, Flitterkins, Reversi, Patchesi, &c. From 1s. upwards. Of all dealers.-JAQUES and SON, Hatton-garden,

links · 
British Newspaper Archive – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1439)
tw-ref-ID · 
2033
published in · 
The Daily News
date · 
21 December 1891
title · 
Christmas Presents
title language · 
English
subtitle · 
A Walk Around the Shops
citation · 
whole 14263 • page 4 • column 2
content

—Somewhat further East, in Hatton-garden, Messrs. Jaques show all that is new for indoor games. There are no shop-windows to indicate to the passer-by the stores of ingenious inventions by which a long evening may be whiled away in the dining or drawing room. We have now not only parlour billiards and lawn bowls, but a parlour curling pond which permits the game of curling in drawing rooms or corridors on prepared cloth over which the stones slide. The "Moorish Fort" is a new round game, played on an ordinary table, the players aiming their balls with a small rest to the centre of the citadel. Some of the old- fashioned games are in as much demand as ever. Bumble Puppy, Tiddledy Winks, and Parlor Tema losing none of their popularity. Halma also holds its own side by with Fletterkins [sic correct=Flitterkins] and the Butterfly Hunt. The latter is a comparatively new game, and it requires a good deal of skill to net five butterflies out of six.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
links · 
British Newspaper Archive – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1440)
tw-ref-ID · 
2034
Daily Sketch (newspaper)
location · 
London, London, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
508

Toggle showing 3 tiddlywinks references for Daily Sketch.
published in · 
Daily Sketch
date · 
21 February 1936
title · 
Boys Demonstrate Game
summary

About the Duke of Kent interest in tiddlywinks

collection · 
original (Chuck Hoey, in Ernest Sewell's Tiddle Tennis game); photocopy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2074
published in · 
Daily Sketch
date · 
17 April 1946
column title · 
Motley Notes
title · 
The Wet Bobs
by · 
Alan Kemp
citation · 
page 199 • column 1
content

[page=198 column=3]No, that is not my sort of quiet, healthful Saturday afternoon. I prefer to [page=199 column=2] stick to tiddlywinks, which I see has been brought into prominence as an athletic sport by Oxford and Cambridge. It is not, however, the only manly sport in which they engage. They are a little more strenuous on the Thames, and the whole of London (entertainment tax or no entertainment tax) turns out to see how strenuous they are.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
links · 
British Newspaper Archive – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1470)
tw-ref-ID · 
2076
published in · 
Daily Sketch
date · 
January 1964
summary

About the debate on changing of game's name

notes · 
Cited in Winking World 5, page 8.
tw-ref-ID · 
2075
Daily Star (newspaper)
location · 
London, London, England, UK
Notes

Daily Star started publication in 1978.

tw-pub-ID · 
526

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Daily Star.
published in · 
Daily Star
date · 
26 September 1979
title · 
"Is it a double or single defector?"
by · 
Bill Caldwell
summary

Depicts various teams in the lobby of the Hotel Continental Geneva, Switzerland.

content

HOTEL CONTINENTAL GENEVA

Rooms

SOVIET QUOITS TREAM

RUSSIAN TIDDLYWINKS SQUAD

VOLGA DARTS LEAGUE

THE WEST

CCCP CRIBBAGE GRAND MASTER

tw-ref-ID · 
2258
The Dispatch (newspaper)
location · 
London, London, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
503

Toggle showing 2 tiddlywinks references for The Dispatch.
published in · 
The Dispatch
date · 
late November 1957
summary

About CUTwC's challenge to play the Goons.

tw-ref-ID · 
2035
published in · 
The Dispatch
date · 
2 March 1958
summary

Frivolous account of the CUTwC-Goons match.

tw-ref-ID · 
2036
The Independent (newspaper)
location · 
London, London, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
494

Toggle showing 5 tiddlywinks references for The Independent.
published in · 
The Independent
date · 
11 July 1992
title · 
Q & A: Points about the javelin… and Agassi the batsman
citation · 
edition online
content

What is the origin of the tiddlywinks term 'nurdled'?

The word 'nurdled' has a mixed pedigree. The Longman Register of New Words records its usage in cricket as meaning 'to score runs with small pushes and deflections', usually implying a rather boring accumulation of runs, generally used in alliterative tandem with words like 'nick' and 'nudge'. I have also seen it used in snooker reports, especially in relation to Steve Davis and the meticulous percentage game in which he still excels, and in rugby union, when a team plays a very tight game in order to capitalise on opponents' errors. - Harry Smyth, Newcastle upon Tyne.

tw-ref-ID · 
2009
published in · 
The Independent
date · 
7 October 2004
title · 
Max Geldray
subtitle · 
Oldest member of the Goons
citation · 
edition online
content

The Goons were loyal to Geldray and, in 1958, when the BBC proposed to drop him from the next series, Sellers said he would not participate if they did. He won the day. Although Geldray was given the occasional line, he was no actor. He did represent the Goons' team at a tiddlywinks championship in Cambridge in 1959.

collection · 
digital web page (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2005
published in · 
The Independent
date · 
11 March 2005
title · 
Can tiddlywinks be saved?
citation · 
edition online
content

Next Wednesday could have been a significant date in the history of this country. And we are not talking about the Budget. March 16 was scheduled to be the final meeting of the Cambridge University Tiddlywinks Club.

Next Wednesday could have been a significant date in the history of this country. And we are not talking about the Budget. March 16 was scheduled to be the final meeting of the Cambridge University Tiddlywinks Club.

This venerable institution has fallen on hard times. Membership has collapsed and apathy reigns among those "winkers" who remain. The inter-college championship has not been contested since 1998. Many say that the natural next step is to disband the club. Such a drastic move has - thankfully - been declared unconstitutional, but the threat that Cambridge winking may soon die out remains.

Cambridge has been the spiritual home of tiddlywinks since it was invented in its modern form half a century ago. If the Cambridge Club falls into desuetude, the whole fragile edifice could come crashing down.

This cannot be allowed to happen. Someone of stature must step in to save this noble sport. What better way for the Chancellor to open his Budget speech next week than to announce a tax break for British tiddlywinks?

collection · 
digital web page (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2007
published in · 
The Independent
date · 
12 March 2005
title · 
Tiddlywinks goes to pot as students shun game
citation · 
edition online
tw-ref-ID · 
2006
published in · 
The Independent
date · 
14 March 2005
title · 
Tiddlywinks goes to pot as students shun game
citation · 
page 16, 36
content

Cambridge University Tiddlywinks Club, founded in 1955, is facing closure due to apathy.

tw-ref-ID · 
2008
Mirror (newspaper)
alternate name · 
Daily Mirror; Sunday Mirror
location · 
London, London, England, UK
Notes

Fielded a team at the first modern match, against CUTwC.

tw-pub-ID · 
488

Toggle showing 15 tiddlywinks references for Mirror.
published in · 
Mirror
date · 
10 March 1905
column title · 
To-day's Programmes
title · 
Cheltenham
subtitle · 
3.30—Open Hunt Steeplechase of 50 sov. Two miles and a half
citation · 
page 14 • column 3 (3/4 down from top)
summary

The name of a horse.

content

Name of horse - age - st[one] - lb

Tiddledy Winks.. a 11 0

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
notability rating · 
not tiddlywinks
tw-ref-ID · 
3772
published in · 
Mirror
date · 
5 July 1907
title · 
The Passing of John Bull
title language · 
English
by · 
W. K. Haselden
content

Some Cup Holders 1917

British Ping-Pong Champion

British Puff Billiards Champion

British Tiddley Winks Champion

British Golf Croquet Champion

British Table Polo Champion

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
links · 
University of Kent - British Cartoon Archive – digitized image and text (free) (tw-ref-link-id 1441)
notability rating · 
minor
type · 
comic
tw-ref-ID · 
2041
published in · 
Mirror
date · 
2 October 1908
title · 
The Dangers of Sport
by · 
M. W.
citation · 
page 7 • column 1 (3 paragraphs from bottom of page)
content

The moral of all this is that we must either make up our minds to take our lives in our hands when we indulge in sport, or we must devote ourselves to its sedentary forms. It is evidently in games where you move about that the danger comes in, but we do not remember to have heard of anyone receiving injuries of, a fatal or even a serious nature while playing draughts, tiddledywinks, or beggar-my-neighbour. Stilt there is always an opponent’s temper to be reckoned with, and, perhaps, bearing this in mind, games for one are. the safest.

Patience, which has many attractive forms, and solitaire may be recommended as amusements to those who wish to avoid the element of danger in sport, but we doubt whether they will make any serious inroads on other recognised forms of recreation. Perhaps after all It is as well that the nation should retain in its character something of the dare-devil strain.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
3773
published in · 
Mirror
date · 
15 December 1908
title · 
The Season of Christmas Parties
subtitle · 
A Conversatino with Some Hints as to How They May Be Managed
citation · 
page 10 • column 3 (1/4 down from top)
content

PROGRESSIVE GAMES.

“How do you eat it—with cream and a spoon?” asked the boy.

“Dick !” said his aunt reproachfully.

“Well, there, are a lot of game arranged at different tables,” she explained. “Fish-ponds at one, the race game at another, spellicans at a third, tiddley winks at a fourth, puff-and-dart at a fifth, wall quoits , at a sixth and so on, and you each have a programme given you for your score.

“The score?”

“Yes, you get marks at each table proportionate to the amount of success you attain at each game, and the prize-winners are those girls and boys who receive the greatest number of marks for the whole series.”

But do we all start at the same table ?”

“No, you enter in pairs and draw lots for the table you start at. Suppose you two started at the fox and geese table (No. 8), you would, of course, go on to table nine, which might be bagatelle, and so on, working round until you got back to where you started. By having just twice as many guests as there are games there is no waiting, and plenty of opportunity of suiting all tastes.

”Margie, get out the speilicans ! I must get some practice with the niblick.”

”And so must I, Dick.”

We leave the children happy in the thought of this progressive game party, a successful blend of many toys.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
3774
published in · 
Mirror
date · 
5 May 1955
title · 
I've got a date with a dustbin!
by · 
Noel Whitcomb
citation · 
page 2 • column 3
content

I 'd just finished sorting out this rubbish business when Liz came in with a letter: "Looks like another invitation," she said. "Open It,"" says I. "It may be about one of these big sporting junkets taking place next week."

"Liz read it ,and a slow smile curled itself round her [sic pan]; "Yes—, it's a sporting invitatlon," she said. ""Just your line of country, too."

"I reached for it, suspiciously."

"It was from the Cambridge Unjversity Tiddleywinks Club, ask­ing me if I could knock up a team to play them."

"PerIshing Impertinence!" I roared. What makees them think I am the chap to get in touch with on the matter of tiddleywlnks?What Is thls—a conpiracy?"

"Take it easy," grinned Liz.. "They p r o b a b l y play it the strenuous way."

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
links · 
UK Press Online – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1388)
tw-ref-ID · 
1970
published in · 
Mirror
date · 
18 June 1955
column title · 
Noel Whitcomb's Saturday Page
title · 
What a tiddly game of winks!
subtitle · 
… the Night My Glamour Girls Played the Champs
by · 
Noel Whitcomb
citation · 
page 9 • column 1
summary

Account of CUTwC's first tiddlywinks match, against the Daily Mirror's Whitcomb's Winkers.

content

WHAT with all the fuss about Gordon Pirie beating the Hungarian runners Royal Ascot being postponed a notable sporting event this week has so far gone unnoticed.

I refer to the terrific tiddlywinks match—a thrilling struggle—between the World Champions, Cambridge University Tlddlywinks Club, and Whltcomb's Winkers—an up and coming team In the tiddly world.

The match was fixed when science-student Bill Steen, President of Cambridge University Tlddlywlnks Club, rang me early in the week.

OLD CLUB TIE

" We're an official club," said Bill. " In fact, we're applying to the University authorities for a quarter-blue, and we have club writing-paper and a specially designed club tie—a gold ' C.U.Tw.C' on a blue background.

"We're world champs at the moment because we can't find any challengers," said Bill. " Not even the Americans will play us. And Oxford simply can't knock up a team."

"I'll fix that." says I. "How about bringing the team to London for a World Championship match against my own tlddlywink experts, the Whitcomb Winkers?"

So we arranged it. With Machiavellian cunning I fixed the day after the end-of-term ball at Cambridge, when I figured the lads would be pretty tired.

I then cast around for some other ploy of gamesmanship to ensure victory for our side. At last I hit upon it, " I'll have eight smashing girls in my team," I said to myself. "So that when they get down on the floor to play, the Cambridge lads will be so put off their tiddles hey won't get a wink in edgeways.

" At the same time I will organise a cocktail party for the lads—before and during tihe match—which should take care of the World Championship for Whitcomb…"

ALAS! Even the best laid sporting strategies can go awry. We lost— but what a battle. (And what a helluva good party, too !)

I rang up all! the girls I could think of who looked as though they'd be good at such indoor sports as tiddly-winks, and gathered a team that the Folies-Bergere would have been proud of.

'The title hoiders nearly lost

There was Margot Holden, from the Windmill ("We, Never Clothed") Theatre;

Jackie Collins and Christina Lubicz, a couple of Bill Watts's most promising young starlets;

Film star Pat Dainton and cabaret star Yana, from the Pigalle, and two "daughters of Eve"—Pat Gibson and Jay Hart, from the Eve Ciub—who usually appear clad in bright smiles.

Also Colleen Pexter, just over from South Africa, after winning the Hibiscus beauty competition, as a prize for which she is staying at the Savoy for a month while she works as a model for Norman Hartnell…

IN HOT PURSUIT

And last—but by no perishing means least—Teri Harrison, a honey-brunette from British Guiana, who is over here studying acting and dancing.

As the sun set on a perfect June evening. Whitcomb's Winkers—looking smashing in model gowns—arrived at Ye Olde Cock Tavern in the heart of London's newspaperland, and repaired to the tiddlywinks room.

They were hotly followed (and I'm not kidding) by the eight young champions from Cajnbridge—wearing their elegant blue and gold " C.U.Tw.C." ties—who were already beginning to lose interest in tiddlywinks.

"Do all your team know how to play " I was asked. suspiciously, by Rikki Martin, Cambridge club secretary.

"They're all tiddly experts," I nodded, bringing over Teri Harrison. "You can play tiddlywinks, can't you, Teri ? I asked.

"If you can, I can," grinned Teri. "What is it?"

To avoid any further awkward questions I declared the bar open, and the visiting team laid down their four championship mats—very smart Cambridge-blue jobs, specially designed for tiddlywinks. "We split up Into four pairs, now," beamed a young undergraduate called John Rilett, collecting pint with one hand and Margot Hoiden with the other. "Then we all get down on the floor and lay out our winks!"

Teri Harrison looked at me doubtfully.

"Not to worry." says I, "The winks are the little round counters, and the big round ones are called squidgers.

FLICK 'EM!

"You flick the little 'uns with the big 'uns, and try to get them into the cup in the centre of the mat."

"Half a moment," cut in David Arundale, from Cambridge. "You've got ten on your side. The proper team is eight."

"Two reserves," I explained, "in case some of us find it too exhausting."

Margot Hoiden whispered in my ear: "Ever since I played in cabaret at Cambridge University I've rooted for Oxford in the boat race. I hope the tiddlywinks team aren't so rough as the other lot."

They weren't, by golly! In fact. they were such perfect young gentlemen that Whitcomb's cunning strategy nearly came off— they helped the girls to get their winks in first.

Only just in time—as I sent the waiter round again—did they discover that some of the girls were secret tiddlywinkers and that the champions were in danger of losing.

After Margot Holden won two games straight off—she has a fine eye for a wink—and Pat Dainton showed a clean pair of heels to Roger Parker and Brian Tyler, they rallied just ih time.

And by the time the Marquis of Milford Haven wandered in with painter Vasco Lazzolo, Whitcomb's Winkers were vanquished —nine games to three.

THE MASCOT

But—as the waiter went round again, and the visiting team chaired Teii Harrison as their future mascot—everyone agreed that (even though skipper Whitcomb himself is no smart flicker), it was the tiddliest game of winks that the world champs had ever played.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
links · 
UK Press Online – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1389)
tw-ref-ID · 
1973
published in · 
Mirror
date · 
14 April 1958
column title · 
Live Letters
title · 
Long life to teacher
subtitle · 
Tiddlywinks
citation · 
page 18 • column 3
content

L. M. HOWELLS, Cambridge University Tiddly winks Club. Christ's College. C a m b r i d g e, writes:

We appreciated that mention of tiddlywinks In your column recently.

We started our club three years ago and carried out research into such factors as the flight, spin and roll of a tiddlywink.

We have a set of rules. but these differ from those used by Oxford University and some boys' clubs in the Bristol area.

It is to correct this state of affairs which threatens the progress of this noble—nay, royal!—sport that we are holding the First World Tiddlywink Congress in Cambridge in June.

Happy, winking to all delegates sir!

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
links · 
UK Press Online – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1394)
tw-ref-ID · 
1978
published in · 
Mirror
date · 
late November 1958
summary

Report on CUTwC to challenge the Goons.

tw-ref-ID · 
2042
published in · 
Mirror
date · 
23 February 1959
column title · 
Life in the Mirror
title · 
Dis guy's no dook!
subtitle · 
New Champs
by · 
John Rolls
citation · 
page 2 • column 5
content

I HEAR that the GOONS have been dropped as the DUKE OF EDINBURGH'S tiddleywink champions.

The reason: Their crushing defeat last year by the Cambridge University Tiddleywinks Club by sixteen games to two.

The Duke's new champions, who will meet Cambridge in a charity contest in aid of the National Playing Fields Association, come from a Berkeley-street luncheon and dining club. They are training—on champagne.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
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UK Press Online – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1397)
tw-ref-ID · 
1981
published in · 
Mirror
date · 
25 March 1959
column title · 
Life in the Mirror
title · 
Winking Night
by · 
John Rolls
citation · 
page 2 • column 3
content

RESPLENDENT in Royal Marines dress uniform and White pith helmet, Lance-Corporal GORDON CARTER bugled the "alert" to a titled dinner-jacketed audience at London's Empress Club last nlght.

It was the start of the World Championship Tiddleywinks Match between the holders, Cambridge University, and the Empress Club, challengers.

Said Carter: "I feel a proper 'nana&hellips; I thought tiddleywinks was a children's game."

He mopped his brow, took off his helmet, swallowed a double shot of rum, and added: "To think that my General, SIR HUGH STOCKWELL… I served at Suez under him… should be playing tiddleywinks."

Tactics

THE corporal, on a special assignment from Eastleigh Barracks, near Portsmouth, glanced at the shirtsleeved general sporting crimson braces, crouching over the tiddleywinks table, and said:

"Well, I'll get a night's leave out of it at home in Welwyn Garden City."

Sir Hugh Stockwell, G.O.C. Ground Forces in the Suez operation three years ago, who captained the Club team, fingered a green tiddleywink and told me:

"You have to use tactics in this game, my boy. I practised here very seriously on Sunday.

"I'm rather good at squopping:—it means landing your wink on top of your opponent's…"

Philip's Cable

WHILE the general's team including LORD STRATH-CARRON, LORD VALENTINE THYNNE, DENIS COMPTON, the EARL OF KIMBERLEY, and TERRY-THOMAS battled against a determined Cambridge, a cable arrived from the Royal yacht Brittania.

It was from PRINCE PHILIP—whose pet charity the Playing Fields Association got last night's proceeds.

It said: I expect this contest to be played in the usual thoroughly unsportsmanlike, manner of all great tiddieywink matches.

"I chose the Empress Club as my champions because they are capable of an even dirtier game than the Goons.

"They had better win or I shall withdraw their winking licence."

Cambridge winked home easily. Over to you, sir!

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UK Press Online – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1408)
tw-ref-ID · 
1994
published in · 
Mirror
date · 
26 August 1960
column title · 
Life in the Mirror
title · 
The Long Wink
subtitle · 
They're 'squopping' round the world
citation · 
page 2 • column 1
content
Black and white photograph of three young women.
Three of the round-the-world winkers, pictured outside their Fulham headquarters yesterday. They are (left to right) Debbie Coutts, 24, and twenty-one-year-old twins Jill and Jacq Goodrick.

WELL, squop me! If this isn't the craziest idea in international relations yet…

Squopping, of course, is a tiddlywinks expression for [sic original="stymying" correct="stymying"] your opponent by covering his wink with your wink. And here is a new idea—which might be called "Togetherness with Tiddlywinks"—by eight British youngsters who set off next month on a world trip.

Their idea Is to unite people everywhere in common understanding through the simple sociable game of tiddlywinks.

Best Way

THE group's leader, tall, ex-Army officer GERRY HUGHES, Master of Arts, Oxford, who has no particular job at the moment; told me:

"This is the best way for making contact with people, from ambassadors to Aborigines.

From remote jungle villages to cities, we will make friendly contact by playing tiddlywinks.

Even if we can't speak their language."

Girls

THE group consists of three girls in their twenties, and five young men, who foregather in London's Fulham.

They have already raised £2,700 for the trip, and they have converted two Land Rovers into travelling homes.

"The Twinkers," as they call themselves, have all given up their jobs for adventure.

They include secretaries, surveyors, a travel agent, a farmer and a schoolteacher

Practising

Two of the team are getting married tomorrow before they leave. They are pretty blue-eyed teacher DEBBIE COUTTS, who Is twenty-four. and Worcestershire round farmer TONY CARR, who Is twenty-five.

Debbie told me yesterday: "We have been practising hard at tiddlywinks.

"I'm sure we'll help world understanding."

Well, the way things are the world, Ike and Mr. K. perhaps could do worse than play tiddlywinks.

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tw-ref-ID · 
1983
published in · 
Mirror
date · 
17 March 1961
column title · 
Life in the Mirror
title · 
North Stars
by · 
Rex North
citation · 
page 9 • column 6
content

JOE LOSS and orchestra have been busy squidging and squopping between dance sessions. Translation: Playing tiddlywinks. "We play Cambridge University on Saturday," Joe told me.

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tw-ref-ID · 
1995
published in · 
Mirror
date · 
24 January 1964
column title · 
The Rex North Column
citation · 
page 11 • column 1
content

PETER DOWNES, chairman of the English Tiddleywinks Association, plans a major reform in the game. He feels the word "tiddley" puts people off. So his association Is asking all players to call the game "Winks."

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tw-ref-ID · 
1987
published in · 
Mirror
date · 
31 December 1965
title · 
The Squoppers Put Tiddlywinks in Peril
citation · 
page 3 • column 2
content

THE squidgers and squoppers were worried. All the bite had gone out of their game.

As an exciting spectacle the pastime of tiddly winks was dying…

Time after time games ended without a wink in the pot. And the squoppers were the flrst lo admit—it was their fault, they were too good.

For the squoppers' job is tn stop their opponents from aiming for the pot by covering their winks as the little counters are called.

When a wink is covered by an opponent's wink, it is impossible to squidge—that is, to shoot— for the pot.

So a world congress was called. The aim was brighter tiddlywinks. It was essential that there should be more shots at the pots.

The experts decided that the only way was to give a points incentive to players who got all their winks in the pot within twenly minutes.

"It was rather like a blanket defence in football," explained Mr. Peter Downes, Manchester schoolmaster and vice-president of the English Tiddlywinks Association, last night.

"Defensive play was threalening to spoil the game as a spectacle.

"Matches ended without a wink in the pot because players covered their opponents' winks and prevented them making; shots.''

Next week, the first championship under the new rules will be held in Manchester.

Eighty competitors from schools and youth clubs will fight for the Northern Tiddlywink Crown.

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tw-ref-ID · 
1988
published in · 
Mirror
date · 
6 March 1967
title · 
Students tops at tiddlywinks
citation · 
page 3 • column 3
content

CAMBRlDGE University defeated Iheir archrivals, Oxford, at the week-end in a three-hour tiddlywinks battle.

It was the first win In three years for Cambridge In their annual tiddlvwinks contest—and the biggest victory by any team in six years.

Cambridge followed up their success yesterdav bv beating Sussex in the Prince Philip Silver Wink competition between thirty of Britain's universities.

collection · 
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UK Press Online – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1405)
tw-ref-ID · 
1989
The Observer (newspaper)
location · 
London, London, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
504

Toggle showing 28 tiddlywinks references for The Observer.
published in · 
The Observer
date · 
21 December 1862
title · 
Christmas Amusements
citation · 
page 3 • column 5 (paragraph 2)
content

ROYAL ENGLISH OPERA, COVENT-GARDEN.—The pantomine here is by Mr. Henry J. Byron, and is entitled, ”Harlequin Beauty and the Beast; or The Gnome Queen and the Good Fairy”—a subject well known to the juvenile world. [...] Square Tiddlywinks and his manservant, Muddlehead, are returning home in the family gig, when a high wind drives them into an enchanted wood [...]

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
notability rating · 
not tiddlywinks
tw-ref-ID · 
3762
published in · 
The Observer
date · 
28 December 1862
title · 
Christmas at the Theatres
citation · 
page 7 • column 2 (halfway down)
content

ROYAL ENGLISH OPERA.—“Harlequin Beauty and the Beast; or, the Gnome Queen and the Good Fairy” comes from the inventive brain of Mr. H. J. Byron. [...] In the introductory passages of the pantomime Mr. W. H. Payne greatly distinguishes himself by his grotesque impersonation of a certain Squire Tiddlywinks, than which nothing more extravagantly odd has of late been seen upon the stage.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
notability rating · 
not tiddlywinks
tw-ref-ID · 
3763
published in · 
The Observer
date · 
27 February 1927
column title · 
New Novels
title · 
Mr. Maxwell and Others
by · 
Gerald Gould
citation · 
page 8 • column 5 (first paragraph)
content

And very nice too, if it weren't for the way in which Mr. Keable does it. He intimidates one with intimacies. He is jauntily at his ease with the most sacred emotions. He puts one in mind of the inkly-winkly tiddlywinks.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2043
published in · 
The Observer
date · 
28 July 1935
column title · 
The Films
title · 
The Film of the B.B.C.
subtitle · 
A Story Without an End
by · 
C. A. LeJeune
citation · 
page 10 • column 5 (7th paragraph)
content
a

The only just reason I can see for this film's existence is the excellent acting of Charles Boyer as the Eurasian hero, and Loretta Young's cool voice and persistently decorative appearance as the society bud. The scenes between them are physically so good to look at and listen to that they give a far greater authority to the picture than the subiect warrants. M. Boyer and Miss Young might be talking gibberish and playing tiddlywinks with the passions, and we should still take pleasure In their encounters. Which is possibly just as well, for much of the time they are.

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notability rating · 
minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2044
published in · 
The Observer
date · 
6 December 1936
column title · 
Cricket
title · 
Next Season's Fixtures
citation · 
page 38 • column 5 (last paragraph)
content

PLAYERS WITH A THIRST.

There is also the evil connected with refreshments brought onto the field between the ordinary intervals. Occasionally, perhaps, the entrance of the man with the tray and glasses Is justified—on an afternoon of abnormal heat, for example. But it has recently beeome the practice on some grounds for drinks to be brought out even on a mild morning at the end of every hour. Ot course, everybody realises that cricket is a very thirsty and tiring business, but endurance should be one of its tests. It is not a parlour game. Cross-country running is a thirsty and tiring business, but we should not think much f the competitors if they made a gentlemen's agreement to stop for a drink and a short rest at the end of every two miles. A cricketer who cannot stand up from half-past eleven to half-past two without liquid refreshment should turn to a gentler game. There is always tiddlywinks. "WATCHMAN.''

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2045
published in · 
The Observer
date · 
22 March 1959
column title · 
Sayings of the Week
citation · 
page 15 • column 1
content

The world is now looking to tiddlywinks in its need to get back to the primeval simplicity of life.—Rev. E. A. Willis, General Secretary, English Tiddlywinks Association.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
notability rating · 
important
tw-ref-ID · 
2046
published in · 
The Observer
date · 
20 December 1959
column title · 
The Observer's Sayings of the Year
citation · 
page 8 • column 5 (7th paragraph)
content

The world is now looking to tiddlywinks in its need to get back to the primeval simplicity of life. Rev. E. A. Willis, General Secretary, English Tiddlywinks Association.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
notability rating · 
important
tw-ref-ID · 
2047
published in · 
The Observer
date · 
3 January 1960
column title · 
Letters to the Editor
citation · 
page 4 • column 7 (halfway down)
content

The Rev. E. A. Willis, whom we quoted in our Sayings of the Year (December 20). describing him as "General Secretary, English Tiddlywinks Association," asks us to say that he has never held this office, and that to the best of his knowledge no such Association exists. He regards the whole thing, including the statements attributed to him, as "a harmless student prank."

notes · 
This letter was submitted by another person named Willis. See The Observer (London), letter to the editor by E. A. Willis on 10 January 1960.
collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2048
published in · 
The Observer
date · 
10 January 1960
column title · 
Letters to the Editor
title · 
Tiddlywinks
by · 
E. A. Willis
citation · 
page 30 • column 5 (halfway down)
content
a

Sir,—

The statement with regard to the English Tiddlywinks Association which you published last Sunday has caused astonishment to many people. The Association is existing and very active. Only last week it held its Northern Junior Championship, with over 100 entries, in aid of the National Playing Fields Association, on whose behalf it has raised funds since its inception.

The remark of mine which you included in your "Sayings of the Year" was quite authentic.

My term of office as secretary has now expired and the present secretary is Mr. W. M. Steen, B.A., of Windyridge, Crawley, Sussex—a former member of the Cambridge University Tiddlywinks Club, and a member of the English International team. The English Tiddlywinks Association has affiliated clubs in many Universities and schools.

Possibly there is another gentleman, less knowledgeable than he ought to be about this noble sport, with the same name as myself.

Richmond, Surrey, E. A. Willis

The disclaimer we published was from Mr. A. E. Willis, of London, S.W.1. He had evidently suffered annoyance from being confused with Mr. E. A. Willis, of whose existence and office he was not aware.

notes · 
Refutes letter by another Willis that was printed in the 3 January 1960 Observer (London).
collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2049
published in · 
The Observer
date · 
19 February 1961
column title · 
Sport in Brief
title · 
Brumel leads by two inches
subtitle · 
Tiddlywinks
by · 
Stephen Clemens, compiler
citation · 
page 19 • column 3
content

THE Cambridge Masonic Hall was the scene of an important occasion in the history of tiddlywinks yesterday, There Oxford won the third annual inter-Varsity match by 59½ points to 52½.

It was the first time that Cambridge, unofficia!ly recognised as the world champion squidgers, have lost a match since the club was founded in 1954.

Experts inform me that Oxford are now hot favourites for the Duke of Edinburgh's trophy, a silver wink presented annually to the winners of the all-England inter-university competition (proceeds to the [acronym short="N.P.F.A." long="National Playing Fields Association"], of course.)

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2050
published in · 
The Observer
date · 
4 June 1961
column title · 
Brain-Twister—31
title · 
Tiddlywinks
by · 
D. St. P. Barnard
citation · 
page 5 • column 1 (top)
content
a

THE chairman of the London University Union Tiddlywinks Club tells me that this problem actually arose when, not so long ago, two English universities challenged each other to a tiddlywinks match. According to the rules for such matches each team is made up of four pairs. (We shall call the four pairs representing the Home Team A, B, C, D, and the four pairs representing the Visiting Team a, b, c, d.) During the match each pair on one team plays every pair on the opposing team. The match itself is divided into four rounds with four games played simultaneously in each round.

Now the Home Team possessed four mats, the surfaces of which varied quite considerably and, as Tiddlywink enthusiasts will be well aware the surface of the mat considerably affects one's playing ability. In order to be absolutely fair, it was therefore decided that each pair should play one of its games on each mat. A chart was drawn up and this is how the captains started allocating the teams:—

                Mat 1  Mat 2  Mat 3  Mat 4
Round 1   Aa        Bb       Cc
Round 2   Bc
Round 3   C
Round 4

How should the remainder of the chart be completed? There is only one possible solution./p>

Solutions on postcards, to arrive not later than first post Thursday and marked "COMP" in the bottom right-hand corner, to Brain-Twister 31, The Observer 22, Tudor Street E.C.4.

collection · 
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notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2051
published in · 
The Observer
date · 
15 April 1962
title · 
Do you have 24 qualified* friends
by · 
TWA
citation · 
page 24 • column 5 (bottom)
content

Go as a group to America. Save up to £66.10 each!

[...]

*Qualified members of civic, religious, business or social club, clan, tiddlywinks and marbles society, or whatever the name of your organization.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
notability rating · 
minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2052
published in · 
The Observer
date · 
22 December 1963
title · 
The squidging hots up
citation · 
page 11
content
Black and white illustration of a stylized human pressing a wink with a finger, and its trajectory toward a pot.
Haro

WHILE IN NO WAY claiming to have narrowed Britain's trade gap, writes Ben Wright, tiddly winks players in the Manchester area point out with some pride that more than 45O tiddly wink's sets have been exported to America since Oxford University's recent tour of that country.

Despite all efforts to discredit it—and the natural reaction to the man who claims prowess at this sport ia a hearty belly laugh—tiddly winks is catching on in a big way.

One young man who was described in the official organ of the game as the "W. G. Grace of tiddly winks," recently emigrated to India, where. as sccretary of the newly founded Indian Tiddly Winks Association, he reported that the finger joints of the people there made them particularly suited to the game.

Our own northern junior tiddly winks championship, to be ,staged in the Lesser Debating Hall of Manchester University's union on January 2 and 3, 1964, has attracted a record ect:ry of 70 pairs.

These are the schoolboys from whose ranks the future aces of the game will come. Twenty couples from Manchester Grammar School are competing and two boys will be travellimg from Heanor, in Derbyshire, to play in this event. Proceeds will go, as usual, to the National Playing Fields Association which has already received over £1,700 from the game's authorities.

Tiddly winks is played on pile-free felt, measuring six feet by three feet. The object of each match is for each side to flick six winks, or small plastic counters, into a cup one and a half inches high and one and seven eighth inches across its top. The first player to do so with his six winks gains four points, the second two points, the third one point.

But there is more to it than that. One member of each team attacks the cup—his team mate's duty being to stop a member of the opposition from doing that very same thing. This he does by covering his opponent's wink with his own, thus putting It out of action until freed by another wink&mdash:from his own side—landing on top of the heap.

Ken Vietch, a student ol history at Manchester University, who promotea the northern championship, told me : "There are some extraordinary pile-ups. l iike to compare the game with chess in the intricacy of its strategies.".

Tiddly winks has small vocabulary—just two words of its own—squidging and squopping. To squidge is to play a shot. To squop is to cover an opponent's wink.

David Miller and Cristopher Hull, 17-year-old pupils ot Altrincham Grammar School and holders of the northern junior trophy, are favorites to win again but dislike being so highly fancied. Win or lose, they are certain to spread further the appeal of this charming and pleasant game which began humbly in its present form at Cambridge University in 1955 and has a firm fan in the Duke of Edinburgh.

Veitch, who play for eight-times unbeaten England against Wales at Bristol on March 7, told me: "l hate the gimmicks and gamesmanship that are creeping into the sport, however."

It seems that not even the most apparently innocent sport can escape corruption for long in this era of tougher·than-ever international competition.

notes · 
See Newswink of April 1971, page 6.
collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
notability rating · 
important
tw-ref-ID · 
2067
published in · 
The Observer
date · 
20 June 1965
column title · 
Katharine Whitehorn's Column
title · 
Such grinning honour
by · 
Katharine Whitehorn
citation · 
section Weekend Review • page 29 • column 3 (first paragraph)
content

If you meet a Sir Petcairn Terrier you can't guess whether his ancestor slipped a bit to James II or his father to Lloyd George; whether his great-grandfather quelled natives for Queen Victoria or whether he himself won an Olympic medal for tiddlywinks or ran his post office with unblinking devotion for 67 years.

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notability rating · 
minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2053
published in · 
The Observer
date · 
28 November 1965
column title · 
Sound
title · 
For a Laugh
by · 
Paul Ferris
citation · 
page 25 • column 6 (second paragraph)
content

No doubt it's the oldest truism in the business, but you can't help marvelling at the hypocrisy of the outcry over a **** on television when comedy show (at least in radio) are loaded with clumsy sexual innuendos that go as near as they dare and make the audiences whoop with delight.

For instance, Larger than Life (Light), in a sketch about sex education, had the line: "When a boy meets a girl, the first thing he feels is, ah… a feeling of embarrassment." Gales of laughter. Now for Nixon (Light), built around David Nixon, squeezed the last sad drop out of a joke about a tiddlywinks tournament, and he had the audience in hysterics with lines like "take your tiddly in your hand." Presumably no one will go running to the Director-General.

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digitized image PDF (NATwA)
notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2054
published in · 
The Observer
date · 
20 April 1969
title · 
Charlie's university
citation · 
page 40 • column 4 (second paragraph)
content

NOTES on University College, Aberystwyth, where Prince Charles begins his one-term course in Welsh language, history and culture tomorrow.

Described to us as a 'chip university based on a pub culture.' Drink, sport and religion are the most popular pastimes. The tiddlywinks team is one of the most formidable in the British Isles.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
notability rating · 
minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2055
published in · 
The Observer
date · 
8 November 1970
column title · 
World of Sport
title · 
And never the twain…
subtitle · 
Tiddlywinks
by · 
David Hunn
citation · 
page 22 • column 5
content

It's a dastardly blow for tiddlywinks that British justice should have decided neither to nod nor wink at tiddling in a pub for personal gain. 'It falls within the Betting and Gaming Act,' said York police, po-faced. The sporting landlord who had offered a crate of beer for the best player in the house has had to replace the contest with one for puffing at peas through a straw. There's logic for you: not allowed to tiddle, but peas are quite in order.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
notability rating · 
minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2056
published in · 
The Observer
date · 
7 September 1975
title · 
The eaglets dare again
subtitle · 
Manchester United 3, Tottenham Hotspur 2
by · 
Leslie Duxbury
citation · 
page 16 • column 3
content

Column 2McNab was Column 3 the next to display his precocity with a pass inside to Duncan, which he appeared to flip as if the ball were a tiddlywink.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
notability rating · 
minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2057
published in · 
The Observer
date · 
23 November 1975
title · 
Play power
citation · 
page 27 • column 9
content

Column 8The games are: [....] Column 9 a set of tiddlywinks [...]

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2068
published in · 
The Observer
date · 
8 February 1976
title · 
Continental missiles
citation · 
page 20 • column 9
content

What next? Inter-galactic tiddlywinks?

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
notability rating · 
minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2058
published in · 
The Observer
date · 
14 November 1976
title · 
Hot recipe for carp
by · 
Ian Bain
citation · 
page 20 • column 9 (near bottom)
content

The fish ran for the cover of the lilies, but the Expert didn't earn his nickname playing tiddlywinks and he turned in from the refuge with the apparent case of an acrobat.

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notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2059
published in · 
The Observer
date · 
24 July 1977
title · 
Dissidents in the madhouse
by · 
John Ziman
citation · 
page 28 • column 8 (second paragraph)
content

There is always the argument that a learned society such as the World Psychiatric Association should not mix in 'politics'—as if the psychiatrist were as distant from social life as a tree surgeon, and as little involved in political and ethical issues as a tiddlywinks champion.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2060
published in · 
The Observer
date · 
26 February 1978
title · 
The screen on the green
by · 
Peter Dobereiner
citation · 
page 26 • column 5 (second paragraph)
content

Their opponents are both household names from sport: Crusher Jones, veteran central defender for Watford Reservers and Fred Smith, who recently retired undefeated after holding the southern area tiddlywinks title for 20 years, no less.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2061
published in · 
The Observer
date · 
10 December 1978
column title · 
Books
title · 
Rocks to rugby—read all about it
by · 
Julie Welch
citation · 
page 30 • column 5 to 6 (at bottom)
content

Winning Snooker with Eddie Charlton (Pan, £2.50). One of Pan's very good Sports/Pastimes instructional paperbacks which cover virtually everything from Intermediate Tiddlywinks to Underwater Macramé.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
2062
published in · 
The Observer
date · 
1 December 1985
column title · 
Sport At Large
title · 
Who wins at Winks
by · 
David Hunn
citation · 
page 41 • column 1 (below center)
content

TIDDLYWINKS: When to tiddle and what to wink is as far as most of us go, but to some this is a serious business. Yesterday England faced the United States across a pot at Wadham College, Oxford; last Sunday an American, Larry [sic original="Khan" correct="Kahn"], had the effrontery to take the English national title; and tomorrow he and Nottingham teacher Alan Dean battle for the world crown.

Black and white cartoon illustration of a person shooting a wink in to clouds over a pot, with another person at right wearing a pointy hat.
collection · 
original (NATwA); digitized image PDF (NATwA)
notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2063
published in · 
The Observer
date · 
23 February 1986
column title · 
Sport At Large
by · 
David Hunn
citation · 
page 49 • column 1 (at bottom)
content

TIDDLYWINKS: Cambridge pair Barrie and Budd's cup overflowed yesterday. They scored a perfect 21-0 win as their team retained the Varsity trophy, beating Oxford 73-11.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2064
published in · 
The Observer
date · 
19 October 1986
column title · 
Sport At Large
by · 
Alan Hubbard
citation · 
page 49 • column 1 (halfway down)
content

TIDDLYWINKS: Never mind the Today League. The real stuff starts next weekend at Lincoln College, Oxford, when the new tiddlywinks season 'squidges' off. According to the English Tiddlywinks Association, the activity is enjoying something of a revival, with capacity crowds no doubt swelled by more refugees from Saturday soccer hooliganism. A nod's as good as a wink.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
notability rating · 
somewhat interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2065
published in · 
The Observer
date · 
2 June 2002
title · 
The Browser
citation · 
edition online
content

More fun is to be had from a consideration of the life of the late Baron Wodehouse, whose sad death was reported last week. The 4th Earl of Kimberley had six wives, played championship tiddlywinks, bred prize pigs and was sacked from the Liberal benches in the Lords for urging people to vote Tory. He knew his first marriage was a mistake but couldn't stop it because, he said: 'The King and Queen were there - and I was in my best uniform.'

collection · 
digital webpage (NATwA)
notability rating · 
somewhat interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2066
The Pall Mall Gazette (newspaper)
location · 
London, London, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
505

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for The Pall Mall Gazette.
published in · 
The Pall Mall Gazette
date · 
6 January 1891
title · 
Skating as a Science
citation · 
whole 8360 • page 3 • column 2
content

But in England, whatever the sport, there will always be some who take it seriously. For all we know, there may be persons who scorn delights and live laborious days in reducing the parlour game of "Tiddlywink" to its ultimate possibilities.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
links · 
British Newspaper Archive – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1468)
tw-ref-ID · 
2071
The Penny Illustrated Paper (newspaper)
location · 
London, London, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
506

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for The Penny Illustrated Paper.
published in · 
The Penny Illustrated Paper
date · 
30 November 1895
title · 
The World of Women
citation · 
whole 1801 • page 356 • column 4
content

Messrs. C. W. Faulkner & Co., Jewin Street, please the youngsters who rejoice in table games with some fresh inventions for their amusement in the shape of the indoor quoiting pastime dubbed "Tiddley Winks"' likewise "Skitto," also an up-to-date variation of chess, called "'House of Commons," with Ministers and Leaders of Opposition to play at cross-purposes precisely as they do in the real Parliament.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2072
The People (newspaper)
location · 
London, London, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
519

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for The People.
published in · 
The People
date · 
2 March 1958
citation · 
page 11
summary

About the Goons-Cambridge match on 1 March 1958.

tw-ref-ID · 
2251
The Standard (newspaper)
alternate name · 
Evening Standard
location · 
London, London, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
509

Toggle showing 22 tiddlywinks references for The Standard.
published in · 
The Standard
date · 
12 November 1888
by · 
F. H. Ayres
citation · 
whole 20075 • page 6
content

ORIGINAL GAMES.

  • "REVERSI." By J. W. Mollett, B.A.
  • "INVASION." By Lieut. Chamberlain, R.N.
  • "NAVAL BLOCKADE." By Ditto]
  • "DAAMA;" or Turkish Draughts.
  • "SPOOF."

Manufactured by F. H. AYRES 111. Aldersgate-street, London. To be had from all Stationers, Fancy Goods Dealers, &c.

links · 
British Newspaper Archive – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1489)
tw-ref-ID · 
2095
published in · 
The Standard
date · 
13 November 1888
by · 
F. H. Ayres
citation · 
whole 20076 • page 7 • column 4 (3/4 down)
content

ORIGINAL GAMES.

  • "REVERSI." By J. W. Mollett, B.A.
  • "INVASION." By Lieut. Chamberlain, R.N.
  • "NAVAL BLOCKADE." By Ditto]
  • "DAAMA;" or Turkish Draughts.
  • "SPOOF."

Manufactured by F. H. AYRES 111. Aldersgate-street, London. To be had from all Stationers, Fancy Goods Dealers, &c.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
links · 
British Newspaper Archive – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1490)
tw-ref-ID · 
2096
published in · 
The Standard
date · 
10 December 1888
by · 
F. H. Ayres
citation · 
whole 20099 • page 7 • column 4 (middle)
content

NEW GAMES

Manufactured by F. H. AYRES.

  • INVASION SPOOF
  • REVERSI DAAMA
  • HALMA ASSEGAL
  • NAVAL BLOCKADE.
  • STAUNTON CHESSMEN.
  • (Club Pattern.)
  • FOLDING BAGATELLE BOARDS.
  • MINIATURE BILLIARD TABLES.
  • DRAUGHT BOARDS AND MEN.
  • ROCKING AND HOBBY HORSES.
  • &c., &c.

From all dealers, or No. 111 Aldersgate-street, E.C.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
links · 
British Newspaper Archive (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1471)
tw-ref-ID · 
2077
published in · 
The Standard
date · 
4 March 1889
by · 
Jaques & Son
citation · 
whole 20171 • page 7 • column 4 (4th entry from bottom)
content

TIDDLEDY WINKS.—Just Out, a splendid NEW GAME, price 1s. Watermans Reversi, and Patchesi, the most popular Games of the day, 1s., 2s. 6d., and 5s. each, of all dealers—JAQUES and SON, Hatton-garden, E.C.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
links · 
British Newspaper Archive (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1472)
tw-ref-ID · 
2078
published in · 
The Standard
date · 
8 March 1889
by · 
Jaques & Son
citation · 
whole 20175 • page 1 • column 8 (2nd entry from bottom)
content

TIDDLEDY WINKS.—Just Out, a splendid NEW GAME, price 1s. Watermans Reversi, and Patchesi, the most popular Games of the day, 1s., 2s. 6d., and 5s. each, of all dealers—JAQUES and SON, Hatton-garden, E.C.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
links · 
British Newspaper Archive (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1473)
tw-ref-ID · 
2079
published in · 
The Standard
date · 
15 March 1889
by · 
Jaques & Son
citation · 
whole 20181 • page 7 • column 2 (middle)
content

TIDDLEDY WINKS.—Just Out, a splendid NEW GAME, price 1s. Watermans Reversi, and Patchesi, the most popular Games of the day, 1s., 2s. 6d., and 5s. each, of all dealers—JAQUES and SON, Hatton-garden, E.C.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
links · 
British Newspaper Archive (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1474)
tw-ref-ID · 
2080
published in · 
The Standard
date · 
22 March 1889
by · 
Jaques & Son
citation · 
whole 20187 • page 1
content

TIDDLEDY WINKS.—Just Out, a splendid NEW GAME, price 1s. Watermans Reversi, and Patchesi, the most popular Games of the day, 1s., 2s. 6d., and 5s. each, of all dealers—JAQUES and SON, Hatton-garden, E.C.

links · 
British Newspaper Archive (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1475)
tw-ref-ID · 
2081
published in · 
The Standard
date · 
25 March 1889
by · 
Jaques & Son
citation · 
whole 20189 • page 7
content

TIDDLEDY WINKS.—Just Out, a splendid NEW GAME, price 1s. Watermans Reversi, and Patchesi, the most popular Games of the day, 1s., 2s. 6d., and 5s. each, of all dealers—JAQUES and SON, Hatton-garden, E.C.

links · 
British Newspaper Archive – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1480)
tw-ref-ID · 
2082
published in · 
The Standard
date · 
29 March 1889
by · 
Jaques & Son
citation · 
whole 20193 • page 4
content

TIDDLEDY WINKS.—Just Out, a splendid NEW GAME, price 1s. Watermans Reversi, and Patchesi, the most popular Games of the day, 1s., 2s. 6d., and 5s. each, of all dealers—JAQUES and SON, Hatton-garden, E.C.

links · 
British Newspaper Archive – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1481)
tw-ref-ID · 
2083
published in · 
The Standard
date · 
1 April 1889
by · 
Jaques & Son
citation · 
whole 20195 • page 1
content

TIDDLEDY WINKS.—Just Out, a splendid NEW GAME, price 1s. Watermans Reversi, and Patchesi, the most popular Games of the day, 1s., 2s. 6d., and 5s. each, of all dealers—JAQUES and SON, Hatton-garden, E.C.

links · 
British Newspaper Archive – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1482)
tw-ref-ID · 
2084
published in · 
The Standard
date · 
15 April 1889
by · 
Jaques & Son
citation · 
whole 20207 • page 4
content

TIDDLEDY WINKS.—Just Out, a splendid NEW GAME, price 1s. Watermans Reversi, and Patchesi, the most popular Games of the day, 1s., 2s. 6d., and 5s. each, of all dealers—JAQUES and SON, Hatton-garden, E.C.

links · 
British Newspaper Archive – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1483)
tw-ref-ID · 
2085
published in · 
The Standard
date · 
19 April 1889
by · 
Jaques & Son
citation · 
whole 20211 • page 1
content

TIDDLEDY WINKS.—Just Out, a splendid NEW GAME, price 1s. Watermans Reversi, and Patchesi, the most popular Games of the day, 1s., 2s. 6d., and 5s. each, of all dealers—JAQUES and SON, Hatton-garden, E.C.

links · 
British Newspaper Archive – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1484)
tw-ref-ID · 
2086
published in · 
The Standard
date · 
22 April 1889
by · 
Jaques & Son
citation · 
whole 20212 • page 1
content

TIDDLEDY WINKS.—Just Out, a splendid NEW GAME, price 1s. Watermans Reversi, and Patchesi, the most popular Games of the day, 1s., 2s. 6d., and 5s. each, of all dealers—JAQUES and SON, Hatton-garden, E.C.

links · 
British Newspaper Archive – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1485)
tw-ref-ID · 
2087
published in · 
The Standard
date · 
26 April 1889
by · 
Jaques & Son
citation · 
whole 20217 • page 4 • column 4 (8th entry from bottom)
content

TIDDLEDY WINKS.—Just Out, a splendid NEW GAME, price 1s. Watermans Reversi, and Patchesi, the most popular Games of the day, 1s., 2s. 6d., and 5s. each, of all dealers—JAQUES and SON, Hatton-garden, E.C.

links · 
British Newspaper Archive – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1486)
tw-ref-ID · 
2088
published in · 
The Standard
date · 
2 October 1890
by · 
Jaques & Son
citation · 
page 7 • column 4 (near bottom)
content

NEW GAMES.

JAQUES and SON'S CATALOGUE post free.

Ducdam C[ ]rkitt[ ], Bumble Puppy, Pliffkins. Halma, Tiddledy Winks, Flitterkins, Reversi, Patchesi, &c. From 1s. upwards. Of all dealers.—Jaques and Son, Hatton-garden, London.

links · 
British Newspaper Archive – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1487)
tw-ref-ID · 
2093
published in · 
The Standard
date · 
14 October 1890
by · 
Jaques & Son
citation · 
page 8 • column 4 (2/3 down)
content

NEW GAMES.

JAQUES and SON'S CATALOGUE post free.

Ducdam C[ ]rkitt[ ], Bumble Puppy, Pliffkins. Halma, Tiddledy Winks, Flitterkins, Reversi, Patchesi, &c. From 1s. upwards. Of all dealers.—Jaques and Son, Hatton-garden, London.

links · 
British Newspaper Archive – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1488)
tw-ref-ID · 
2094
published in · 
The Standard
date · 
13 November 1890
by · 
Jaques & Son
citation · 
page 4 • column 4 (bottom)
content

NEW GAMES.

JAQUES and SON'S CATALOGUE post free. Ducdamé, Corkitta, Bumble Puppy, Pliffkins, Halma, Tiddledy Winks, Flitterkins, Reversi, Patchesi, &c. From 1s. upwards. Of all dealers.—Jaques and Son, Hatton-garden, London.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
3765
published in · 
The Standard
date · 
27 November 1890
by · 
Jaques & Son
citation · 
whole 20714 • page 6 • column 5 (5th ad from bottom)
content

JAQUES AND SON'S CATALOGUE post free. Ducdamé, Corkitts, Bumble Puppy, Pliffkins, Halma, Tiddledy Winks, Flitterkins, Reversi, Patchesi, &c. From 1s. upwards. Of all dealers—JAQUES and SON, Hatton-garden, E.C.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
links · 
British Newspaper Archive (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1476)
tw-ref-ID · 
2089
published in · 
The Standard
date · 
28 November 1927
by · 
David Low
content
Black and white cartoon illustration including a man crouching on the floor, playing tiddlywinks.

Scene in Parliament. Grave Disorder

In one corner of the smoking-room one may see George Lansbury and Sir Alf Mond playing tiddlywinks.

Low howls down another theatrical production.

collection · 
digitized image (NATwA); digital webpage (NATwA)
type · 
comic
tw-ref-ID · 
2090
published in · 
The Standard
date · 
2 September 1930
by · 
David Low
content
Black and white political cartoon of three holes of miniature golf, with a male player and his caddle hitting a ball with a golf club at the tee of one hole. At rear and right are onlookers.

Political Midget Golf Demonstration

Speaking as one who has just returned after many years, I say that what this country needs is a vigorous policy of tiddlywinks.

Naw! Ping pong

Amazing sporting development during Low's absence.

collection · 
digitized image (NATwA); digital webpage (NATwA)
type · 
comic
tw-ref-ID · 
2091
published in · 
The Standard
date · 
3 April 1935
by · 
David Low
content
Black and white political cartoon pf a man (wearing dark coat and top hat) holding a box in the air, labeled both "BUDGET SURPLUS" and "FINANCIAL TIDDLYWINKS". To his left is a man (bald with long mustache) holding his hands up in the air and wearing a loose cloth around his waist. At right is an endless array of men with caps, with "SURPLUS OF WASTING MANHOOD" below. Two short human-like figures appear at lower center, the left one with "ONANDNANDNAN" on the lower fringe of its coat, and the right one with "UPANUPANUP" on the lower fringe of its coat. The cartoonist's mark, "LOW", appears in the lower left.

SUCH PROSPERITY! TWO SURPLUSES!!

collection · 
digitized image (NATwA); digital webpage (NATwA)
notability rating · 
minor but interesting
type · 
comic
tw-ref-ID · 
2092
published in · 
The Standard
date · 
13 December 2001
title · 
Tiddlywinks is a Christmas cracker
by · 
Ross Davies
citation · 
edition online
content

THE shops may be full of Harry Potter merchandise ranging from small figurines to hitech—and high-cost—computer games, but the humble game of tiddlywinks is staging a comeback this Christmas.

Department stores group John Lewis said tiddlywinks sales are up 18% this year as the market struggles to find its champion seller this festive season.

'There is no toy of choice this Christmas,' said Vanessa Lodge, assistant toy buyer for the John Lewis Partnership.

While Harry Potter games have been in short supply, last year's favourites - scooters and anything to do with the Pokemon characters - are in decline and falling in price. It may not necessarily be that parents are turning to tiddlywinks as stocking-fillers because they are cheaper than other games. John Lewis's own-brand Mischief tiddlywinks, for example, retail at £5.25.

'Snakes & ladders, draughts and chess are doing well, too,' Lodge said. 'You could say traditional games are coming back this year. After all, they are harder to break and they are less noisy.'

Trying to flip counters into a receptacle by pressing them with another counter became popular in late Victorian times. As a commercially available game, it was patented by its British inventor, publisher Joseph Fincher of London, in 1889 as Tiddledy Winks.

collection · 
digital webpage (NATwA)
notability rating · 
minor
tw-ref-ID · 
3769
The Star (newspaper)
location · 
London, London, England, UK
Notes

The Star was an evening newspaper in London from 1788 to 1960. It is unrelated to the later Daily Star newspaper.

tw-pub-ID · 
524

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for The Star.
published in · 
The Star
date · 
20 May 1921
title · 
About Australian Cricket
by · 
David Low
citation · 
page 3
content

If we are to have interesting cricket this season, it will be necessary to put some sort of handicap on these Australians.

Supposing we make them play with ping-pong bats -

Or permit the opposition bowlers to use a push-ball

Should they have the bad manners to continue their disgraceful conduct there would seem to be nothing for it but to challenge them to a crochet competition or a tiddlywinks tournament and equalise matters that way.

London seems different these days

type · 
comic
tw-ref-ID · 
2257
The Sun (newspaper)
location · 
London, London, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
527

Toggle showing 4 tiddlywinks references for The Sun.
published in · 
The Sun
date · 
31 May 1980
title · 
Men fall to Pam's winks
notes · 
A photocopy appears in Winking World 36, page 1.
collection · 
photocopy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2259
published in · 
The Sun
date · 
21 January 1983
title · 
Tiddlywink king goes potty over flipping record
citation · 
page 11
collection · 
original (CUTwC)
tw-ref-ID · 
2260
published in · 
The Sun
date · 
6 January 1997
column title · 
SunSpot
title · 
10 things we can actually beat the Aussies at
citation · 
page 11
summary

About Christine Barrie serving as the first female ETwA Chairman.

tw-ref-ID · 
2261
published in · 
The Sun
date · 
14 February 2003
citation · 
page 6
summary

Feature mentioning that the current world champion at tiddlywinks is Cambridge lecturer, Patrick Barrie.

tw-ref-ID · 
2262
The Telegraph (newspaper)
alternate name · 
Daily Telegraph
location · 
London, London, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
510

Toggle showing 16 tiddlywinks references for The Telegraph.
published in · 
The Telegraph
date · 
21 February 1936
title · 
The Duke of Kent Praises B.I.F. Exhibits
summary

About the Duke of Kent's interest in tiddlywinks as displayed and sold at the British
Industries Fair, on 20 February 1936.

collection · 
photocopy (NATwA); original (Chuck Hoey, in Ernest Sewell's Tiddlytennis game)
tw-ref-ID · 
2097
published in · 
The Telegraph
date · 
February 1958
summary

Probably an article about preparations for the CUTwC-Goons match.

tw-ref-ID · 
2098
published in · 
The Telegraph
date · 
around February 1981
summary

Report on tiddlywink up nose

content source · 
Fresno Bee
tw-ref-ID · 
2099
published in · 
The Telegraph
date · 
10 May 1997
tw-ref-ID · 
2100
published in · 
The Telegraph
date · 
17 May 1997
tw-ref-ID · 
2101
published in · 
The Telegraph
date · 
9 August 2003
title · 
Squidgers and winks
by · 
Matt Mayers
citation · 
edition online
content

Sir - Boris Johnson claims (Opinion, Aug 7) that "there is only one sport at which England currently has world supremacy, and that is rugby union".

Actually, four of the world's five highest-rated tiddlywinks players are English. The modern game was developed at Cambridge University in the 1950s, and English players continue to lead the world.

So, if you really want your children to be world champions, give them a sick note to get off rugby, buy them a squidger and some winks and tell them to get potting.

collection · 
digital webpage (NATwA)
links · 
The Telegraph – web page (free) (tw-ref-link-id 1491)
tw-ref-ID · 
2102
published in · 
The Telegraph
date · 
6 February 2007
title · 
The night science came to the party
by · 
Nic Fleming
citation · 
edition online
content

Earlier that evening, the distinguished palaeontologist Prof Richard Fortey, President of the Geological Society, gave the 2007 Michael Faraday Prize Lecture in which he focused on the threat to biodiversity from global warming and the need for more taxonomists.

One topic he did not address was his equally serious concern about the direction of modern tiddlywinks. He confessed as much when The Daily Telegraph confronted him with evidence from an unnamed source that he had been a member of the 1967 Cambridge University tiddlywinks team.

He complained: "The modern game seems to have promulgated the defensive tactic of [sic original="squoping" correct="squopping"] (landing one's wink on top of an opponent's to immobilise it) at the expense of getting the wink into the pot. In my day it was about getting the wink in the pot."

collection · 
digital webpage (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2112
published in · 
The Telegraph
date · 
30 March 2008
title · 
Tim Berners-Lee: a very British boffin
by · 
Nigel Farndale
citation · 
edition online
content

I ask what things people get wrong about him. He nods earnestly. 'I only played tiddlywinks as a student to get a ride to Cambridge one day. I wasn't a champion or anything. Things can get out of proportion.'

links · 
The Telegraph – web page (free) (tw-ref-link-id 1492)
tw-ref-ID · 
2103
published in · 
The Telegraph
date · 
15 November 2009
column title · 
Books
title · 
Why Enid Blyton's greatest creation was herself
by · 
Garry Jenkins
citation · 
edition online
content

The drama recreates a moment during this period that sums up Blyton's cynical and manipulative methods. "There's an interesting piece of newsreel in which the family is playing tiddlywinks, and Kenneth is just referred to as 'father'. This is all part of her reinvention. She was aware of the importance of maintaining brand integrity," says Hawes.

links · 
The Telegraph – web page (free) (tw-ref-link-id 1493)
tw-ref-ID · 
2105
published in · 
The Telegraph
date · 
8 July 2010
column title · 
Book Review
title · 
Peter Pan's First XI: the extraordinary story of JM Barrie's cricket team by Kevin Telfer: review
by · 
Tony Lichtig
citation · 
edition online
content

PG Wodehouse was a useful batsman; Jerome K Jerome was rather better at idling; AA Milne liked to watch it even more than to play it; and Arthur Conan Doyle was prodigious: a superb all-rounder who played 10 games at first-class level for the MCC and was delighted to bowl out an ageing WG Grace: "Once in my heyday of cricket, / One day I shall ever recall! / I captured the glorious wicket, / The greatest, the grandest of all." Barrie himself was an unlikely captain: "a weedy fellow a little over five feet tall" and "not a man's man". But he was a boy's boy and "bowled an insidious left-hand". He was also a whizz at tiddlywinks, shuffleboard and throwing cards into a hat.

links · 
The Telegraph – web page (free) (tw-ref-link-id 1494)
tw-ref-ID · 
2106
published in · 
The Telegraph
date · 
2 August 2010
title · 
London 2012: Cadbury under fire for tiddly wink legacy
by · 
Harry Wallop
citation · 
edition online
content
Color photograph of Cadbury dairy milk bars.
Cadbury hopes games of tiddly winks and thumb wrestling in the run up to London 2012 will help "help build stronger communities" Photo: Reuters

Cadbury, the "Official Treat Provider to London 2012", has come under fire for its programme to get the nation playing tiddly winks, thumb wrestling, crazy golf and paper aeroplane racing.

It announced that it is starting "an ambitious programme to get millions of people across the UK and Ireland playing games by 2012 – leaving a lasting legacy of community spirit in the UK and Ireland".

It hopes that millions of people will split into either the spot team or the stripe team, play games such as thumb wrestling and throwing screwed up paper into a waste paper basket. They then need to register on a website whether they won their game or not. They can also join a Facebook group on the internet to find out where their local tiddlywinks or chair hoopla competition is being held.

links · 
The Telegraph – web page (free) (tw-ref-link-id 1495)
tw-ref-ID · 
2107
published in · 
The Telegraph
date · 
9 August 2010
title · 
Children think hopscotch is a drink
citation · 
edition online
content

Half have never heard of Tiddlywinks or Leap Frog and only a third of today's youngsters know what Cats' Cradle is.

collection · 
digital webpage (NATwA)
links · 
The Telegraph – web page (free) (tw-ref-link-id 1496)
tw-ref-ID · 
2108
published in · 
The Telegraph
date · 
14 October 2010
title · 
Jim White: rise of poor Pohnpei is one in the eye for world rankings
by · 
Jim White
citation · 
edition online
content

It was not to do with the format: in truth the crowds would have been huge had Sachin Tendulkar's lads been triumphant in tiddlywinks.

collection · 
digital webpage (NATwA)
links · 
The Telegraph – web page (free) (tw-ref-link-id 1497)
tw-ref-ID · 
2109
published in · 
The Telegraph
date · 
27 October 2010
title · 
Paul Dixon calls for owners to 'exert maximum harm' on bookmakers by striking
by · 
Marcus Armytrage
citation · 
edition online
content

A future that should be all about 'getting real'. They're killing income, not creating it, and remain the only sport in Britain outside of tiddlywinks, that hasn't advanced in recent years.

collection · 
digital webpage (NATwA)
links · 
The Telegraph – web page (free) (tw-ref-link-id 1498)
tw-ref-ID · 
2110
published in · 
The Telegraph
date · 
22 December 2010
title · 
Sports Quiz 2010
by · 
Jonahan Liew
citation · 
edition online
content

TWEET THEIR WORDS

32 "So gutted for Poulter!! What a crap rule! Poults may not have won the Dubai world championship, but he could be in with a shout for tiddlywinks world championship!"

collection · 
digital webpage (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2111
published in · 
The Telegraph
date · 
3 July 2014
title · 
Britain can still be sporting champions… in tiddlywinks
subtitle · 
Don’t worry about the World Cup and Wimbledon – here are the sports where Britain still reigns supreme
by · 
Olivia Goldhill
citation · 
edition online
content
Color photograph of a brown Chad Valley Games Bakelite Tidleywinks container, winks, and cup.
We may be out of the World Cup and Wimbledon, but Britain could still win at Tiddlywinks Photo: ALAMY

Tiddlywinks

It takes real dexterity to become the champion of tiddlywinks: the game where you flick small disks into a central hole. There may be a North American Tiddlywinks Association but, as a traditional parlour game from Victorian England, the yanks are unlikely to win. Last year, Patrick Barrie won the Wimbledon of Tiddlywinks when he won the UK Tiddlywinks Singles Championship and beat his American nemesis, Larry Kahn, in a World Singles match. Barrie and Kahn have been in tense competition for the past 16 years but, until the next UK-US tiddlywink battle, Barrie holds the of tiddlywinks grandmaster.

Broken Embedded video link on YouTube.com
collection · 
digital webpage (NATwA)
links · 
The Telegraph – web page (free) (tw-ref-link-id 1499)
tw-ref-ID · 
2104
Think, Educate, Share (TES) (newspaper)
location · 
London, London, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
125

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Think, Educate, Share (TES).
published in · 
Think, Educate, Share (TES)
date · 
19 May 1995
title · 
Diary
by · 
Carborundum
citation · 
edition online
summary

About Peter Downes.

content

Dark secrets are emerging about the past of Peter Downes, president of the Secondary Heads Association and a man who hitherto has appeared to lead an entirely blameless life. His vice? Using his squidger to viciously squop his opponents.

Perhaps we should explain. It has come to light that, while a student at Cambridge back in the 1950s, Mr Downes was a leading light in the university's victorious Tiddlywinks team. Did we say victorious? So accurate was this lot's squopping that they awarded themselves quarter-Blues on the strength of their performance.

In the innocent world of the 1950s, these champions were accorded some status and publicity - although it is not recorded whether John Major followed the team's progress with any great interest from his Brixton hideaway. And thus it came to pass that the undergraduate upstarts challenged Prince Philip to a match after he made some rude remarks about this new sporting craze. He declined, but put forward The Goons in his place for a match in aid of his favourite charity - ironically, enough the National Playing-Fields Association. And so it came to pass that in 1958 Spike Milligan, Harry Secombe, Michael Bentine and Peter Sellers were smuggled past the crowds and through a secret passage into the Cambridge Guildhall for the match of the decade.

"It was widely covered on television and radio, with live commentary from Brian Johnston. And we were on Sportsnight," recalls Mr Downes cheerfully.

"The Goons played in nighties over their clothes, and they kept doing the voices like Bluebottle. Harry Secombe sang an anthem specially written for the occasion. The tickets were sold out weeks in advance and forgeries were in circulation. The media interest was astonishing." Such was the nature of stardom in those days, however, that the comedians' method of transport (they had busy lives) was a Fisons' Pest Control helicopter. Mr Downes took retirement at the ancient age of 23, but still takes a keen interest in the game, which he describes as "very complicated". Which may explain his interest in the arcane world of local authority and school finance.

"It's not just a question of getting the wink in the cup with your squidger, you also have squopping [putting an opponent's wink out of action]. You need the dexterity of a snooker player, and the brain of a chess player, which makes it a good all-round game in which strategy is very important," he explains.

So exactly what is a player called? Mr Downes adds, hurriedly: "We say tiddlywinker rather than winker. It's less open to misunderstanding."

collection · 
digital copy (NATwA)
links · 
TESconnect (free) (tw-ref-link-id 144)
tw-ref-ID · 
397
The Times (newspaper)
alternate name · 
The Sunday Times
location · 
London, London, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
249

Toggle showing 104 tiddlywinks references for The Times.
published in · 
The Times
date · 
23 December 1862
title · 
Royal English Opera, Covent Garden
citation · 
page 6
content

Squire Tiddlywinks (a perfect father and a modeI famer victim to a naughty cultural propensity, who discovers to his cost that there Is no rose without its attendant thorn),

notes · 
Also appears in subsequent editions.
collection · 
To be retrieved
tw-ref-ID · 
2211
published in · 
The Times
date · 
5 March 1889
by · 
Jaques & Son
citation · 
whole 32638 • page 2 • column 5 (2nd from bottom)
content

TIDDLEDY-WINKS.—Just out, a splendid NEW GAME, price 1s. Watermans Reversi, and Patchesi, the moat popuilar games of the day, 1s., 2s. 6d., and 5s. each. At all dealers—JAQUES and SON, Hatton-garden, E.C.

collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
The Times (London) (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1500)
tw-ref-ID · 
2113
published in · 
The Times
date · 
31 January 1890
citation · 
whole 32923 • page 2 • column 6 (15th from bottom)
collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2114
published in · 
The Times
date · 
3 November 1891
citation · 
whole 33472 • page 1 • column 4 (at bottom)
collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
The Times (London) (tw-ref-link-id 2237)
tw-ref-ID · 
2115
published in · 
The Times
date · 
13 November 1891
citation · 
whole 33481 • page 1 • column 2 (8th item from bottom)
collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
The Times (London) (tw-ref-link-id 2238)
tw-ref-ID · 
2116
published in · 
The Times
date · 
14 November 1891
citation · 
whole 33482 • page 3 • column 6 (8th from bottom)
collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
The Times (London) (tw-ref-link-id 2239)
tw-ref-ID · 
2117
published in · 
The Times
date · 
21 November 1891
citation · 
whole 33488 • page 3 • column 4 (at bottom)
collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
The Times (London) (tw-ref-link-id 2240)
tw-ref-ID · 
2118
published in · 
The Times
date · 
1 December 1891
citation · 
whole 33496 • page 1 • column 2 (13th from bottom)
collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
The Times (London) (tw-ref-link-id 2241)
tw-ref-ID · 
2119
published in · 
The Times
date · 
4 December 1891
by · 
Jaques & Son
citation · 
whole 33499 • page 1 • column 3 (at bottom)
content

TIDDLEDY-WINKS. A GAME for all; also Halma, Patchesi, Rengar, Ducdamé, the most popular games of the day, 1s., 2s. 6d., and 5s. each. Lists post post free. At all dealers.—JAQUES and SON, Hatton-garden, E.C.

collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
The Times (London) (tw-ref-link-id 2242)
tw-ref-ID · 
2120
published in · 
The Times
date · 
15 December 1891
by · 
Jaques & Son
citation · 
whole 33508 • page 1 • column 3 (at bottom)
content

TIDDLEDY-WINKS. A GAME for all; also Halma, Patchesi, Rengar, Ducdamé, the most popular games of the day, 1s., 2s. 6d., and 5s. each. Lists post post free. At all dealers.—JAQUES and SON, Hatton-garden, E.C.

collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
The Times (London) (tw-ref-link-id 2243)
tw-ref-ID · 
2121
published in · 
The Times
date · 
2 November 1892
by · 
Parkins and Grotto
citation · 
whole 33785 • page 1 • column 6 (11th from bottom)
content

DULL EVENINGS MADE CHEERFUL.—BAGATELLE BOARDS 30s., 50s., 78s. 6d.(specially recommended), £4 18s. 6d., and £5 15s.; balls, cues, bridge, and rules. Chess 8s. 6d.; draughts, 3s.; backgammon, 7s. 6d.; dominoes; Ducdame, 10d.; tiddledy-winks, 10d.; Halma, 3s. 9d. All the above of excellent quality. Reversi and all other indoor games. Catalogue post free—PARKINS and GROTTO, Game Department, Oxford-street, London.

collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
The Times (London) (tw-ref-link-id 2244)
tw-ref-ID · 
2122
published in · 
The Times
date · 
5 November 1892
citation · 
whole 33788 • page 3 • column 2 (9th from top)
collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
The Times (London) (tw-ref-link-id 2245)
tw-ref-ID · 
2123
published in · 
The Times
date · 
12 December 1892
by · 
Parkins and Grotto
citation · 
whole 33819 • page 1 • column 5 (8th from bottom)
content

DULL EVENINGS MADE CHEERFUL.—BAGATELLE BOARDS 30s., 50s., 78s. 6d.(specially recommended), £4 18s. 6d., and £5 15s., complete. Chess, 8s. 6d.; draughts, 3s.; backgammon, 7s. 6d.; dominoes, excelsior, scrimmage, war-game, honey-pots, 10d.; kono, 10d.; pirouette, 10d.; tiddledy-winks, 10d.; halma, 3s. 9d. Reversi and all other in-door games. Catalogue free.—PARKINS and GROTTO, Game Department, Oxford-street, London.

collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
The Times (London) (tw-ref-link-id 2246)
tw-ref-ID · 
2124
published in · 
The Times
date · 
19 December 1892
by · 
Parkins and Grotto
citation · 
whole 33825 • page 1 • column 4 (10th from bottom)
content

DULL EVENINGS MADE CHEERFUL.—BAGATELLE BOARDS 30s., 50s., 78s. 6d.(specially recommended), £4 18s. 6d., and £5 15s., complete. Chess, 8s. 6d.; draughts, 3s.; backgammon, 7s. 6d.; dominoes, excelsior, scrimmage, war-game, honey-pots, 10d.; kono, 10d.; pirouette, 10d.; tiddledy-winks, 10d.; halma, 3s. 9d. Reversi and all other in-door games. Catalogue free.—PARKINS and GROTTO, Game Department, Oxford-street, London.

collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
The Times (London) (tw-ref-link-id 2247)
tw-ref-ID · 
2125
published in · 
The Times
date · 
18 November 1893
citation · 
whole 34112 • page 1 • column 4 (4th from bottom)
collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
The Times (London) (tw-ref-link-id 2248)
tw-ref-ID · 
2126
published in · 
The Times
date · 
27 November 1893
citation · 
whole 34119 • page 1 • column 6 (6th from bottom)
collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
The Times (London) (tw-ref-link-id 2249)
tw-ref-ID · 
2127
published in · 
The Times
date · 
29 November 1893
citation · 
whole 34121 • page 2 • column 6 (5th from bottom)
collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
The Times (London) (tw-ref-link-id 2250)
tw-ref-ID · 
2128
published in · 
The Times
date · 
18 December 1893
by · 
Parkins and Grotto
citation · 
whole 34117 • page 1 • column 4 (16th from bottom)
content

DULL EVENINGS MADE CHEERFUL.—BAGATELLE BOARDS, 30s. 50s., 78s. 6d. (specially recommended). £4 18s. 6d. and £5 15s.complete. Chess, 3s. 6d.; draughts, 3s.; backgammon, 7s. 6d.; dominoes. skedaddles, 3s. 6d.; golf course, 2s. 6d.; royal mail, 2s. 3d. ; honey-pots, 10d.; tiddledy-winks, 10d.; halma, 2s. 3d. Reversi and all other in-door games. Catalogues free.—PARKINS and GOTTO, Oxford-street, London.

collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
The Times (London) (tw-ref-link-id 2251)
tw-ref-ID · 
2129
published in · 
The Times
date · 
19 December 1893
by · 
Parkins and Grotto
citation · 
whole 34138 • page 1 • column 5 (12th from bottom)
content

DULL EVENINGS MADE CHEERFUL.—BAGATELLE BOARDS, 30s. 50s., 78s. 6d. (specially recommended). £4 18s. 6d. and £5 15s.complete. Chess, 3s. 6d.; draughts, 3s.; backgammon, 7s. 6d.; dominoes. skedaddles, 3s. 6d.; golf course, 2s. 6d.; royal mail, 2s. 3d. ; honey-pots, 10d.; tiddledy-winks, 10d.; halma, 2s. 3d. Reversi and all other in-door games. Catalogues free.—PARKINS and GOTTO, Oxford-street, London.

collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
The Times (London) (tw-ref-link-id 2252)
tw-ref-ID · 
2130
published in · 
The Times
date · 
11 February 1897
title · 
The Glasgow Art Institute
citation · 
whole 35124 • page 4 • column 6 (one-third down)
content

A newer painter of the school is Mr. W. S. Shanks, whose picture of two children playing the classical game of "Tiddledy Winks" (407) shows extraordinary cleverness, though of a kind which may easily lead him to play practical jokes upon the public.

collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
The Times (London) (tw-ref-link-id 2253)
tw-ref-ID · 
2131
published in · 
The Times
date · 
14 August 1919
column title · 
Personal
citation · 
whole 42178 • page 1 • column 3 (at top)
content

WOULD like to play Tiddlywinks.—Sweetheart.

collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
The Times (London) (tw-ref-link-id 2254)
tw-ref-ID · 
2132
published in · 
The Times
date · 
24 September 1931
column title · 
Sporting News
title · 
Golf
subtitle · 
The 'News of the World' Tournament
citation · 
whole 45936 • page 5 • column 1 (2nd paragraph from bottom)
content

At the 16th there was an amusing game of tiddley-winks with a double stymie, but it was Cotton who ultimately lofted into the hole and got his half.

collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
The Times (London) (tw-ref-link-id 2255)
tw-ref-ID · 
2133
published in · 
The Times
date · 
14 November 1933
title · 
The Immorality of Ping Pong
citation · 
whole 46601 • page 15 • column 4 (end of 2nd article)
content

The moralist can at any rate reflect that the progress of invention has circumscribed the power for harm of indoor games, of what used to be called parlour games for the long winter evenings. Those games, led by Ludo, were popular and influential because they could be played round one table, with one lamp in the days of one lamp and readings aloud. They have been crowded out by films and wireless sets and gramophones, and moralists now have a pleasant change, contemplating the particular vices and failings induced by passive pleasures in contrast with the younger, ruder, fiercer days, when behind shuttered windows little dice were thrown, and little counters crept along coloured boards, and halma men skipped crookedly to home and victory, and marbles ambled in and out of wooden cavities, and many a brave tiddley was winked.

collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
The Times (London) (tw-ref-link-id 2256)
notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
2134
published in · 
The Times
date · 
24 December 1934
title · 
Queen's Theatre
subtitle · 
Inside the Room
citation · 
whole 46945 • page 8 • column 3 (end of 1st article)
content

Murder, unaccompanied by intelligence or imagination, is less exciting than tiddley-winks.

collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
The Times (London) (tw-ref-link-id 2257)
tw-ref-ID · 
2135
published in · 
The Times
date · 
27 March 1935
title · 
St. James's Theatre
subtitle · 
'Worse Things Happen at Sea'
citation · 
whole 47023 • page 12 • column 2 (end of 1st article)
content

Near the end of this play there is a happy momen—happy not for that reason alone—in which Miss Arnaud and Miss Burrill, who have been quarrelling about a young man, are reconciled in their common discovery that he is unspeakably tedious and sit down to play tiddley-winks.

collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
The Times (London) (tw-ref-link-id 2258)
tw-ref-ID · 
2136
published in · 
The Times
date · 
2 January 1936
title · 
A Nursery Cupboard
subtitle · 
Toys of To-Day and Yesterday
citation · 
whole 47261 • page 13 • column 6 (1st paragraph)
content

After 50 years it is not difficult to recall the look and the smell of the nursery cupboard and to think with some exact-ness of its contents. There were in it bats and balls (for cricket in a small garden), a candle bull's-eye lantern, greatly treasured in the days before electric torches were invented, glass marbles of considerable beauty, a wooden soapbox intended for carpenter's tools but once chosen by the cat as the repository of her kittens, and materials for such table games as ludo and tiddlywinks.

collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
The Times (London) (tw-ref-link-id 2259)
tw-ref-ID · 
2137
published in · 
The Times
date · 
7 February 1938
title · 
Northampton Beaten
subtitle · 
Depleted Teams at Twickenham
citation · 
whole 47912 • page 6 • column 6 (1st paragraph)
content

The Harlequins beat Northampton at Twickenbam on Saturday by a goal and three tries (14 points) to a goal and a try (8 points). Both teams were sorely depleted by county calls, and with a counter-attraction just round the corner for spectators it was rather like witnessing a game of tiddlywinks in the centre of the Sahara desert.

collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
The Times (London) (tw-ref-link-id 2260)
tw-ref-ID · 
2138
published in · 
The Times
date · 
29 August 1938
citation · 
whole 48085 • page 6 • column 7 (2nd paragraph)
collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
The Times (London) (tw-ref-link-id 2261)
tw-ref-ID · 
2139
published in · 
The Times
date · 
31 January 1940
citation · 
whole 48527 • page 9 • column 4 (last paragraph of 2nd article)
collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
The Times (London) (tw-ref-link-id 2262)
tw-ref-ID · 
2140
published in · 
The Times
date · 
23 June 1942
title · 
Mr. Hopkins and a Second Front
citation · 
whole 49269 • page 4 • column 7 (3rd paragraph from bottom)
content

Mr. Harry Hopkins, speaking in New York to-night, predicted a mighty United Nations' offe sive against Hitler with "a second, third, and fourth front if necessary." He revealed that the conferences between President Roosevelt and Mr. Churchill were taking place at the White House, in Washington.

In a wide review of the war, Mr. Hopkins said:-

What of our 3,000,000 trained ground troops, with modern mechanized equipment ? I want to assure this audience to-night that General Marshall, the great leader of our Army, is not training these men to play tiddlywinks.

collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
The Times (London) (tw-ref-link-id 2263)
tw-ref-ID · 
2141
published in · 
The Times
date · 
28 January 1943
citation · 
whole 49455 • page 3 • column 5 (4th paragraph)
collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
The Times (London) (tw-ref-link-id 2264)
tw-ref-ID · 
2142
published in · 
The Times
date · 
5 October 1949
title · 
Hockey sticks… Helmets… and BEETLE*
by · 
British Industrial Plastics, Ltd. (1 Argyll Street, London, W1)
citation · 
whole 51504 • page 3 • column 1 (2nd advertisement)
summary

Advertisement for Beetle Moulding Powders, Adhesives, Industrial Resins

content

Chessmen are moulded, fishing rods are laminated with Beetle. Beetle laminates skis and ice-hockey sticks for winter sports; tennis-rackets and sculls for summer. Beetle adds strength. Crash helmets and hunting-caps have bodies of moulded pulp, Beetle bonded. Beetle adds colour to chess and tiddlywinks, draughts and dominoes.

collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
The Times (London) (tw-ref-link-id 2265)
tw-ref-ID · 
2143
published in · 
The Times
date · 
8 November 1949
title · 
Hockey sticks… Helmets… and BEETLE*
by · 
British Industrial Plastics, Ltd. (1 Argyll Street, London, W1)
citation · 
whole 51513 • page 3 • column 1 (2nd advertisement)
summary

Advertisement for Beetle Moulding Powders, Adhesives, Industrial Resins

content

Chessmen are moulded, fishing rods are laminated with Beetle. Beetle laminates skis and ice-hockey sticks for winter sports; tennis-rackets and sculls for summer. Beetle adds strength. Crash helmets and hunting-caps have bodies of moulded pulp, Beetle bonded. Beetle adds colour to chess and tiddlywinks, draughts and dominoes.

collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
The Times (London) (tw-ref-link-id 2266)
tw-ref-ID · 
2144
published in · 
The Times
date · 
5 December 1955
by · 
Army & Navy Store
citation · 
page 6
content

Everything else from tiddlywinks to tepees

collection · 
to be retrieved
links · 
The Times (London) (tw-ref-link-id 2339)
tw-ref-ID · 
2212
published in · 
The Times
date · 
13 February 1956
citation · 
whole 53453 • page 3 • column 7 (6th paragraph)
collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
The Times (London) (tw-ref-link-id 2267)
tw-ref-ID · 
2145
published in · 
The Times
date · 
1 August 1956
citation · 
whole 53598 • page 9 • column 2 (2nd article 3rd paragraph)
collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
The Times (London) (tw-ref-link-id 2268)
tw-ref-ID · 
2146
published in · 
The Times
date · 
10 December 1956
column title · 
Personal
by · 
J. B. Powell-Jones
citation · 
whole 53710 • page 1 • column 2 (3rd ad from top)
content

CHAMPION TIDDLYWINKS player urgently required for remunerative position. Preferably also good golfer but this is not essential. Telephone Gro. 6363 between 11 a.m. and 5 p.m. to-day and ask for Flat 55. J. B. Powell-Jones.

collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
The Times (London) (tw-ref-link-id 2269)
tw-ref-ID · 
2147
published in · 
The Times
date · 
14 December 1956
title · 
The Game's Afoot
citation · 
whole 53714 • page 11 • column 4 (2nd article)
summary

In response to advertisement in 10 December 1956 edition of The Times (London)

content

Passionate curiosity must have been aroused in many breasts, and sentimental bells set ringing in many memories, by a recent demand in the Personal Column for a champion Tiddlywinks player, who was offered a remunerative position. The mind goes back to the days of Halma and Reversi and the games of long-distant youth. Two perhaps tiresomely pedantic questions sug- gest themselves. First, was not the game spelt "Tiddledywinks"?

Passionate curiosity must have been aroused in many breasts, and sentimental bells set ringing in many memories, by a recent demand in the Personal Column for a champion Tiddly-winks player, who was offered a remunerative position. The mind goes back to the days of Halma and Reversi and the games of long-distant youth. Two perhaps tiresomely pedantic questions suggest themselves. First, was not the game spelt "Tiddledywinks"? It surely was so on the box even as Spillykins figured as " Spellicans." However the dictionary will not take sides and admits either version. Secondly, is there or was there ever a recognized championship of the game whether amateur or professional? It is probably, like the record for the sitting high jump held by one of MR P. G. WODEHOUSE'S young ladies, strictly unofficial. In any case it is cheering to know that the game is still played, for it was great though exacting fun. To have but one counter left to clear the table and that one lying right under the very wall of the little pot, so that it must be made to rise vertically into the air, was a situation to test the coolest nerves. Then remains the most stimulating of questions which may keep the advertiser's telephone ringing for many a long day—namely, "Then what the devil do you want with me, as the man said [sic original="wen"] he see the ghost."

Several possibilities suggest themselves. It would be defamatory even to hint, and we should not think of doing so, that the advertiser is the Honourable Algernon Percy Deuceace, who proposes by the aid of this conspiring champion to rob poor little Thomas Smith Dawkins in an apparently so innocent game. Yet it will obtrude itself and a tiddlywinks sharper could carry his tools of trade about with him so easily. Again, it may be that a drama is to be produced in which the great scene is that of the hero and the villain playing a desperate game of tiddlywinks for the hand of the heroine. That would be splendid theatre, but the greatest player of any game, even a champion, can miss the easiest shot and one slip could ruin the entire scene. A golfing champion having to hole a putt no more than a yard long for the television screen has been observed to delve a little channel in the putting green along which the ball will obediently roll. It might be possible to attach to the counter an invisible thread which should conduct it safely to its goal. Apropos of golf the advertisement says that a good golfer would be preferred for the post though that is not essential. That brings down the whole question to a less exciting plane and the advertiser may merely require a companion with athletic pursuits, golf by day and tiddlywinks after dinner. No one, however, who cultivates the mysterious and the sublime can believe it is as dull as that.

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2148
published in · 
The Times
date · 
17 December 1956
title · 
Keeping Them Occupied
citation · 
whole 53716 • page 9 • column 5 (last paragraph)
content

Indoor tennis is a favorite made-up game of ours. With a length of string mark out a court on the carpet 2 ft. wide and 2½ ft. long. Place a net 3 in. high across the middle (a piece of cardboard doubled over will do). Each player has a large tiddlywinks counter for a bat and a small counter is used as the ball. The server flicks from the base line, and as there are no centre lines the ball is in play so long as it clears the net and lands within the string boundary. Score as in ordinary lawn tennis. When playing doubles partners make alternate strokes as in table tennis.

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2149
published in · 
The Times
date · 
21 January 1957
citation · 
whole 53744 • page 6 • column 2 (4th paragraph from bottom)
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2150
published in · 
The Times
date · 
17 December 1957
title · 
Tiddlywinks
citation · 
whole 54206 • page 9 • column 4 (2nd article)
content

Early in the New Year a match, in aid of the National Playing Fields Association, will be played between the Goons, who have, with permission, taken the tide of Prince Philip's Royal Tiddlywinks Champions, and the Cambridge University Tiddlywinks Club. Tiddlywinks does not yet qualify for a "blue," or even half a one, but it is nice to know that the club has a tie, dark blue with a blue cup and a wink rampant, and that, during the four years of its existence, it has remained unbeaten. The season for such a game as tiddlywinks is now upon us, and the heathen, lesser breeds without the tiddlywink law may make the error of classing it with, for instance, snakes-and-ladders. [...]

Early in the New Year a match, in aid of the National Playing Fields Association, will be played between the Goons, who have, with permission, taken the title of Prince Philip's Royal Tiddlywinks Champions, and the Cambridge University Tiddlywinks Club. Tiddlywinks does not yet qualify for a "blue," or even half a one, but it is nice to know that the club has a tie, dark blue with a blue cup and a wink rampant, and that, during the four years of its existence, it has remained unbeaten.

The season for such a game as tiddlywinks is now upon us, and the heathen, lesser breeds without the tiddlywink law may make the error of classing it with, for instance, snakes-and-ladders. No mistake could be more crass and unforgiveable. Unless there is foul play and the innocent-seeming die loaded, it is a pure matter of chance whether the contestant find himself at the foot of an intoxicating ladder which will, on the instant, transport him from the lowliest positions to an exalted place near the top, or treading on a snake which will forthwith cast him down from whatever eminence he may have achieved. How different from the subtle art of tiddlywinks. Here all depends upon the steady hand, the strong nerve, the experienced eye. To press too hard on the wink and too near its centre is to experience the same kind of embarrassment and frustration as does a golfer hacking away at a ball in a bunker without moving it; to flip it carelessly on the extreme edge is to risk sending it sailing over the cup as an overbold approach finishes in the rough on the far side of the green. What is wanted is something approximate to the touch of LINDRUM making a tricky shot on the billiard table.

What fun they are, these indoor games that come into their own as Christmas approaches, although the exact nature of a number of them eludes the memory. The charming little men, like miniature pawns, which do battle in halma are clear enough, but is Reversi the right name for the contest involving counters of vividly contrasting reds and greens and is it "L'Attaque" which goes in for deep strategic planning involving gallantly portrayed military figures mounted on cardboard ? Whatever the niceties of the matter may be, delightful are these games and others of their tribe, calling, as they do, for what GEORGE ROBEY might have termed a modicum of skill without straining the intellect after the manner of chess. Friendly games are they, where tempers are never lost, and prominent among them is tiddlywinks. May the meeting next month between the imposing opponents be an epic one.

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2151
published in · 
The Times
date · 
1 March 1958
column title · 
Today's Arrangements
citation · 
whole 54088 • page 7 • column 1 (3rd paragraph from bottom)
content

Cambridge University Tiddlywinks Club v. The Goons. Guildhall. Cambridge, 11

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2152
published in · 
The Times
date · 
3 March 1958
title · 
Tiddlywinks Win for Cambridge
subtitle · 
Royal Champions Beaten
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whole 54089 • page 7 • column 4 (3rd article)
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"To scorn tiddlywinks," says the Phoenix Dictionary of Games, "because it is played by children is to refuse milk because it is the food of babies."

This saying has been taken to heart by the Cambridge University Tiddlywinks Club. whose 25-page thesis on the science of tiddlywinks it prefaces. Science is a word here not lightly chosen. and has enabled the Cambridge team, styled as world champions, to defeat yesterday the Goons. who enjoy the title of "Royal Champions" conferred on them by the Duke of Edinburgh.

The match, on four separate pitches set up in the Guildhall, was in aid of the National Playing Fields Association, of which the Duke of Edinburgh is president. The Goons turned out in yellow cloaks and orange striped cricket caps, and were issued with red knee-pads. The Cambridge players wore dinner jackets and ties embroidered with a tiddlywink rampant.

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2153
published in · 
The Times
date · 
10 March 1958
title · 
Cambridge Experiment in Student Journalism
subtitle · 
All-American Issue of 'Varsity'
citation · 
whole 54095 • page 12 • column 8 (article at bottom)
content

Copies were on sale over the weekend of what is beiieved to be a unique experiment in undergraduate journalism. Varsity, the Cambridge University newspaper, had invited 18 American students, unassisted by the normal editorial staff. to bring out an American-language edition. The result was a 20-page issue which included racing selections for a local point-to-point and an eight-page educational supplement.

Varsitywas described by its temporary editors as a conservative paper of the tabloid variety, which is sensational by American standards. The format was considerably changed, but regular readers found certain familiar ingredients in a report of last week's tiddlywinks contest, entitled "Goons Gamble Grail at Guildhall Gambol."

Varsity's weekly circulation is normally more than 5,000. but it is expected that 9,000 copies of this special edition will be read not only in the cloistered courts of Caambridge hut also on college campuses in America. "We have tried throughout," the editors of the new venture said, "to give our readcrs, English or American, some idea of the university life led by their transatlantic counterparts." They also claim to have sold the largest amount of advertising space in the history of the paper.

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2154
published in · 
The Times
date · 
10 May 1958
title · 
Tiddlywink Title in Dispute
subtitle · 
Oxford Claim After Win Against Cambridge
citation · 
whole 54147 • page 4 • column 5 (2nd article)
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Eight members of the Cambridge Tiddlywinks Club came here to-day to play against Oxford. Wearing their club tie—a light blue cup with winks rampant on a dark blue ground—they certainly looked like the self-appointed world tiddlywink champions that they are. But after their exhausting contest of three hours and a quarter with the Oxford University Tiddlywinks Society they were disputing Oxford's claim that the title now belonged to them.

Oxford beat Cambridge by 89 points to 87, playing under Cambridge rules during the first Parts of the contest. The Oxford captain, Mr. Elliott Langford (University College), said after the game: "We are definitely claiming the title from Cambridge."

The indignant Cambridge team secretary, Mr. Peter Downes (Christ's College), retaliated: "Oxford are being small minded about this. It was only an experimental game to-day and we didn't have out our strongest team." Mr. Downes explained that the whole thing could be ironed out at the world tiddlvwink congress in Cambridge next month when a definitive set of rules would be drawn up.

Long before the storm broke the referee, the Rev. E. W. Willis, of Richmond, Surrey, extolled the virtues of the game. Tiddlywinks, he said, taxed every fibre of the brain and every muscle of the body. It developed delicacy of touch, corrected colour blindness, was a soothing influence on the nerves and was conducive to restful sleep. He added that it was extremly conducive to [sic original="frindliness" correct="friendliness"] and developed sportsmanship.

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2155
published in · 
The Times
date · 
12 May 1958
column title · 
News in Brief
title · 
MPs to Meet Oxford at Tiddlywinks
citation · 
whole 54148 • page 6 • column 1 (halfway down)
content

Mr. Lawrence Turner, M.P. for Oxford, told members of Oxford University Tiddlewinks Society on Saturday that he would be able to get a parliamentary team to accept a challenge to a tiddlywink contest. After a meeting with Mr. Turner, Mr Tony Cooper (University College), the Master of the Winks, said, "Subject to the consent of the Lord Great Chamberlain the match will be played within the precincts of the House of Commons in the second week of July."

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published in · 
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date · 
27 May 1958
citation · 
edition 5* • page 10 • column 4
summary

Regarding U.S. interest in tiddlywinks.

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2213
published in · 
The Times
date · 
13 June 1958
title · 
Tiddlywinks World Rules Drawn Up
subtitle · 
Association Formed
citation · 
whole 54176 • page 13 • column 4 (2nd article from bottom)
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CAMBRIDGE, June 12.

A meeting which ended amicably at Christ's College, Cambridge. to-day has resulted in establishing an international set of rules for tiddlywinks. Delegates from the major universities spent two days at this first World Tiddlywinks Congress formulating the rules.

The congress, which was sponsored by the Cambridge University Tiddlywinks Club, also formed an English Tiddlywinks Association and appointed the Rev. E. A. Willis, a retired Minister, of Richmond, Surrey, who has played tiddlywinks for more than 50 years, as its secretary general.

Since the Cambridge Club played the "Royal Champions," the Goons, on March 1 and raised £225 for the National Playing Fields Association there has been an extraordinary upsurge of enthusiasm for the game. Numerous inquiries have been received from schools and organizations all over the country, and much interest has been roused in the United States.

Mr. Willis, in an opening address to the Congress, said that tiddlywinks had an important part to play in the bealth. family. and political life of a country." The world is now looking to tiddlywinks in its need to get back to the primeval simplicity of lfe," he declared.

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2157
published in · 
The Times
date · 
22 September 1958
title · 
The Times Crossword Puzzle No. 8,860
citation · 
whole 54262 • page 18 • column 1 (crossword clue 15 across)
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15 Loud impudence at tiddledywinks (4).

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2158
published in · 
The Times
date · 
23 September 1958
title · 
Solution of Puzzle No. 8860
citation · 
whole 54263 • page 20 • column 3 (crossword solution 15 across)
content

15 FLIP

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2159
published in · 
The Times
date · 
1 October 1958
title · 
Golf in a Park on Sunday
subtitle · 
By-Law Challenged
citation · 
whole 54270 • page 4 • column 5 (end of 1st article)
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Mr. James said that the four men were challenging the validity of the by-law and submitted that as private individuals they were entitled to challenge its validity. The by-law was unequal; oppressive, not impartial, and out of date. "Tiddlywinks is a game," he said. "Is that prohibited from being played in the park on a Sunday? If so, this by-law is far too wide in its terms"

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2160
published in · 
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date · 
17 November 1958
title · 
Christmas Comes but Once a Year
citation · 
whole 54310 • page 13 • column 2 (quarter way down)
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Harrods have one department with a complete range of toys none of which costs more than £1. Elsewhere is an aeroplane with an electronic flash control with torch grip; a new type of train signal (electric) for 10s. 6d.; a wide range of character dolls in traditional dress, soft white seals (washable) with long eyelashes from 39s. 6d., and a new game "Carpet Golf," played with tiddlywinks, for 27s. 6d.

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2161
published in · 
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date · 
26 November 1958
title · 
High Court of Justice
citation · 
whole 54318 • page 14 • column 4 (4th paragraph)
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The only ground, counsel submitted, on which it was suggested that the English courts would recognize an order of the New York State, was that the wife had been resident there for three years. She could not be heard to assent to two contradictory jurisdictions—playing with jurisdictions like tiddlywinks.

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27 February 1959
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17 March 1959
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24 March 1959
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published in · 
The Times
date · 
27 July 1959
title · 
The Times Crossword Puzzle No. 9,121
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whole 54523 • page 14 • column 2 (crossword clue 5 down)
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5 Drink to give a tiddlywink a lift (4).

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2166
published in · 
The Times
date · 
28 July 1959
title · 
Solution of Puzzle No. 9,121
citation · 
whole 54524 • page 14 • column 3 (crossword 5 down answer)
content

5 FLIP

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28 November 1959
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4 March 1960
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The Times
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9 January 1961
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20 February 1961
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2 March 1961
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26 August 1961
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4 January 1962
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6 April 1962
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24 August 1962
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26 June 1963
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18 July 1963
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10 February 1964
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published in · 
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5 January 1965
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1 March 1966
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11 July 1966
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1 April 1967
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1 September 1967
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7 December 1968
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published in · 
The Times
date · 
7 August 1969
title · 
Letters to the Editor
subtitle · 
Years of Grace
by · 
Ian A. Evans
citation · 
whole 57632 • page 7 • column 6 (2nd letter from bottom)
content

From Mr. I. A. Evans

Sir,—"If spin and speed win Gloucestershire their first championship..." writes your Cricket Correspondent. If no voice is raised from within the county to put him right, then a long-time exile must make himself heard. First championship! How does Mr. Woodcock suppose the Grand Old Man was spending his time in 1876 and 1877? Tiddley-winks?

Yours faithfully

IAN A. EVANS.

44 Addington Road, Sanderstead, Surrey, Aug. 4.

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5 January 1970
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6 April 1970
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16 May 1970
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13 November 1970
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13 November 1972
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15 May 1973
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date · 
21 June 1973
citation · 
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21 November 1974
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22 November 1974
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24 February 1975
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whole 59328 • page 14 • column 5 (halfway down)
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digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
The Times (London) (tw-ref-link-id 2318)
tw-ref-ID · 
2196
published in · 
The Times
date · 
8 June 1976
citation · 
whole 59724 • page 9 • column 5 (2nd paragraph)
collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
The Times (London) (tw-ref-link-id 2319)
tw-ref-ID · 
2197
published in · 
The Times
date · 
18 June 1977
citation · 
whole 60033 • page 12 • column 1 (1st paragraph)
collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
The Times (London) (tw-ref-link-id 2320)
tw-ref-ID · 
2198
published in · 
The Times
date · 
29 October 1977
citation · 
whole 60147 • page 12 • column 8 (3rd paragraph from bottom)
collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
The Times (London) (tw-ref-link-id 2336)
tw-ref-ID · 
2199
published in · 
The Times
date · 
1 March 1978
citation · 
whole 60245 • page 12 • column 7 (at bottom)
collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
The Times (London) (tw-ref-link-id 2322)
tw-ref-ID · 
2200
published in · 
The Times
date · 
14 February 1979
title · 
Scottish sure they will play Bedford
by · 
John Mason
citation · 
page 33 • column 4
content

They, too, are weather-bound. The alternatives are enough to drive amateur officials—and players—to tiddleywinks.

collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
The Times (London) (tw-ref-link-id 2337)
tw-ref-ID · 
3800
published in · 
The Times
date · 
19 March 1980
citation · 
whole 60579 • page 10 • column 1 (4th paragraph)
collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
The Times (London) (tw-ref-link-id 2323)
tw-ref-ID · 
2201
published in · 
The Times
date · 
29 March 1980
citation · 
whole 60588 • page 10 • column 7 (5th paragraph)
collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
The Times (London) (tw-ref-link-id 2324)
tw-ref-ID · 
2202
published in · 
The Times
date · 
31 October 1980
citation · 
whole 60764 • page 10 • column 3 (4th paragraph)
collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2203
published in · 
The Times
date · 
10 March 1981
citation · 
whole 60872 • page 25 • column 3 (Thames TV 1.30 listing)
collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
The Times (London) (tw-ref-link-id 2326)
tw-ref-ID · 
2204
published in · 
The Times
date · 
4 August 1981
citation · 
whole 60997 • page 2 • column 7 (below center)
collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
The Times (London) (tw-ref-link-id 2327)
tw-ref-ID · 
2205
published in · 
The Times
date · 
29 August 1981
citation · 
whole 61019 • page 24 • column 3 (top)
collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
The Times (London) (tw-ref-link-id 2328)
tw-ref-ID · 
2206
published in · 
The Times
date · 
6 November 1982 to 12 November 1982
citation · 
section Saturday • whole 61382 • page 4 • column 6 (3rd paragraph)
collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
The Times (London) (tw-ref-link-id 2329)
tw-ref-ID · 
2207
published in · 
The Times
date · 
10 December 1982
citation · 
whole 61411 • page 10 • column 2 (halfway down)
collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
The Times (London) (tw-ref-link-id 2330)
tw-ref-ID · 
2208
published in · 
The Times
date · 
8 April 1983
citation · 
whole 61501 • page 23 • column 6 (2nd paragraph)
collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
The Times (London) (tw-ref-link-id 2331)
tw-ref-ID · 
2209
published in · 
The Times
date · 
23 November 1985
citation · 
whole 62303 • page 8 • column 1 (bottom)
collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
The Times (London) (tw-ref-link-id 2332)
tw-ref-ID · 
2210
published in · 
The Times
date · 
1 December 1985
title · 
Tiddlywinks men in a flip
by · 
Veronica Horwell
citation · 
edition Sunday • whole 8417 • page 3 • column 1 (top)
content
Black and white photograph of Nick Inglis leaning down and shooting a wink toward the camera.
Figuring out the perfect flip: mathematician Nick Inglis with his gian squidger—but it's not match for Big Mama

BRITAIN was heavily drubbed at tiddlywinks by the official North American team in the International at Wadham College, Oxford, yesterday. Sadder still, Cambridge University, mother of modern tiddlywinks, lost at home to the American players earlier in the week.

It was the same with cricket: we gave the game to the world and the foreigners return to trounce us. The tiddlywinks pastime, first patented in London in 188, was perfected near the Grants in the Lent term of 1955, when major research produced The Cambridge Thesis—the Science of Tiddlywinks defining the rules and founding the university club. In that primitive era they played knee-padded on the floor, so the important work was qualitative carpet analysis with experments conducted at Eaden Lillie's department store on samples from 5/16 in new pile to 10 in rather worn.

[...]

collection · 
original (NATwA); digital image (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
881
published in · 
The Times
date · 
21 December 1985
column title · 
Sporting Diary
title · 
To the death...
by · 
Simon Barnes
citation · 
whole 62327 • page 8 • column 1
content

I have received further acid correspondence on the great Tiddlywinks Controversy. All the traditions of rivalry between the sporting men of Oxford and Cambridge are summed up in this deadly serious matter. Cambridge University Toddlywinks [sic correct=Tiddlywinks] Club claims to be the only sporting body never to have been defeated by Oxford. Oxford said: Hang on, we won the inaugural match in 1958. Now a former Cambridge president, Stewart Sage, tells me this did not count because it was an experimental match before final rules had been formulated. Furthermore, he adds that a on-off challenge match was held between the universities in 1946, so it was not even the inaugural fixture. As a further point, Oxford and Cambridge even disagreed about the spelling of the word tiddlywinks – the latter version being Cambridge's and accepted, rather traitoriously, by the Oxford English Dictionary, in preference to the Oxford version which includes an "e". I wait with bated breath for the next instalment of the controversy.

collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
The Times (London) (tw-ref-link-id 2333)
tw-ref-ID · 
3799
West London Observer (newspaper)
location · 
London, London, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
507

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for West London Observer.
published in · 
West London Observer
date · 
8 July 1891
title · 
It's a Yankee Doodle!
content
Black and white photograph of Larry Kahn, Paul Ireson, Tony Brennan, and Charles Frankston.
notes · 
Reprinted in Newswink 14, page 1.
collection · 
photocopy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2073
Merseyside • (county)
Liverpool, Merseyside, England, United Kingdom
Liverpool Daily Post (newspaper)
location · 
Liverpool, Merseyside, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
499

Toggle showing 2 tiddlywinks references for Liverpool Daily Post.
published in · 
Liverpool Daily Post
date · 
23 April 1965
tw-ref-ID · 
2021
published in · 
Liverpool Daily Post
date · 
26 April 1965
tw-ref-ID · 
2022
Liverpool Mercury (newspaper)
location · 
Liverpool, Merseyside, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
500

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Liverpool Mercury.
published in · 
Liverpool Mercury
date · 
16 December 1890
title · 
A New Game
citation · 
whole 13398 • page 6 • column 3
content

We have received from Mr. Charles Birchall, of Castle-street, a new game of the "Tiddledy Winks" order, though more elaborate. It is manufactured by Messrs. McCaw, Stevenson, and Orr, of Belfast, and is called 'King's Quoits'. The game consists of flipping little ivory 'quoits' on to a board covered with small steel stakes, and elaborate rules are given as to how much each stake counts. There are the elements of a good and interesting game in it, and it should become popular during the coming holidays.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
links · 
British Newspaper Archive – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1431)
tw-ref-ID · 
2023
Southport, Merseyside, England, United Kingdom
(some Southport newspaper) (newspaper)
location · 
Southport, Merseyside, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
522

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for (some Southport newspaper).
published in · 
(some Southport newspaper)
date · 
April 1962
notes · 
Article mentioned in Winking World 4, page 11.
tw-ref-ID · 
2254
Oxfordshire • (county)
Oxford, Oxfordshire, England, United Kingdom
Oxford Mail (newspaper)
location · 
Oxford, Oxfordshire, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
516

Toggle showing 2 tiddlywinks references for Oxford Mail.
published in · 
Oxford Mail
date · 
16 March 1946
title · 
ANOTHER BLOW FOR OXFORD
subtitle · 
Light Blue Tiddly-Wink Eight's Skill
citation · 
page 3 • column 1
notes · 
Reprinted in Winking World 57, pages 26-27; Newswink 21, page 1.
collection · 
transcript (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2244
published in · 
Oxford Mail
date · 
~ 9 May 1958
summary

The reporter originated the idea of a world tiddlywinks championship. The article is probably about the Oxford-Cambridge match.

tw-ref-ID · 
2245
Somerset • (county)
Blagdon, Somerset, England, United Kingdom
The Mendip Times (magazine)
location · 
Blagdon, Somerset, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
491

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for The Mendip Times.
published in · 
The Mendip Times
date · 
February 2017
title · 
Winks, squidgers and a Bristol
by · 
Mark Adler
citation · 
page 76 • column 1
collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2000
Shepton Mallet, Somerset, England, United Kingdom
Shepton Mallet Journal (newspaper)
location · 
Shepton Mallet, Somerset, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
518

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Shepton Mallet Journal.
published in · 
Shepton Mallet Journal
date · 
week of 23 June 1958
tw-ref-ID · 
2247
Somerset; Avon • (county)
Somerset and Avon Guardian (newspaper)
location · 
Somerset; Avon, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
798

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Somerset and Avon Guardian.
published in · 
Somerset and Avon Guardian
date · 
6 January 1989
title · 
Tiddlywinks, sir, is a serious game
subtitle · 
Forget the nudge, nudge
by · 
Wendy Walker; Kevin Bates
citation · 
page 3; others
summary

Coverage of the Somerset Invitational Tiddlywinks championship held in a Chilcompton pub; includes a photograph of Peter Wright, a photograph of Ed Wynn (incorrectly identified as Wynne), and a photograph of Simon Gandy and Gary Shrimpton.

collection · 
photocopy (NATwA); digitized image of photocopy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2915
Suffolk • (county)
Bury St. Edmond's, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom
Bury Free Press (newspaper)
location · 
Bury St. Edmond's, Suffolk, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
480

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Bury Free Press.
published in · 
Bury Free Press
date · 
13 November 2012
title · 
Older generation inspired
citation · 
edition online
content
Color photograph of a woman and man playing tiddlywinks with felt mats and a round wooden (PinToy) tiddlywinks target.

A COMMUNITY centre got into the Olympics spirit on Tuesday by hosting a sports day for the over 60s.

The Howard Estate Over 60s club, held its ‘Alternative Summer Games’ at the Newbury Community Centre for its members to enjoy a day of fun sports.

Games included darts and shuffle board in the main hall, and tiddly winks and ‘Don’t ring the bell’ in the smaller hall.

collection · 
digital web page (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
1944
Ipswich, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom
Ipswich Journal (newspaper)
location · 
Ipswich, Suffolk, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
495

Toggle showing 7 tiddlywinks references for Ipswich Journal.
published in · 
Ipswich Journal
date · 
15 March 1890
column title · 
The Children's Hour
by · 
Maggie Symington
citation · 
whole 9227 • page 6 • column 2
content

Marian Sharples says she has played at the game of "Tiddley-Winks," and it is very nice. Is that the right way of spelling it? I only made a guess at the orthography.

collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
British Newspaper Archive – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1421)
tw-ref-ID · 
2010
published in · 
Ipswich Journal
date · 
26 April 1890
column title · 
The Children's Hour
by · 
Maggie Symington
citation · 
whole 9233 • page 6 • column 1
content

"We like to play Tiddledy Winks," says Ethel Dent.

collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
British Newspaper Archive – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1422)
tw-ref-ID · 
2011
published in · 
Ipswich Journal
date · 
13 September 1890
column title · 
Advertisements and Notices
citation · 
whole 9253
summary

Including Flitterkins and Tiddledy Winks from S. Smith and Smith

links · 
British Newspaper Archive – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1423)
tw-ref-ID · 
2012
published in · 
Ipswich Journal
date · 
20 September 1890
column title · 
Advertisements and Notices
citation · 
whole 9254
summary

Including Flitterkins and Tiddledy Winks from S. Smith and Smith

links · 
British Newspaper Archive – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1424)
tw-ref-ID · 
2013
published in · 
Ipswich Journal
date · 
18 October 1890
column title · 
The Children's Hour
by · 
Maggie Symington
citation · 
whole 9258 • page 6 • column 2
content

I was glad the parcel contained our favourite Tiddledy-winks, which some of you already know already. We played it with partners, as suggested by the new copyright directions, and my little friends grew merry and excited. The flying counters and shrieks of laughter testified to their appreciation of this game of games. I should strongly advise old Santa Claus to introduce it this Christmas-time wherever it is not already known. I believe each of these games may be had for a shilling.

collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2014
published in · 
Ipswich Journal
date · 
11 July 1891
column title · 
The Children's Hour
by · 
Maggie Symington
citation · 
whole 9296 • page 2 • column 5
content

In reply to numerous little people who have written me about the Tiddledy Winks Pinafore, I cannot supply the conditions of competition, they are given with each pinafore.

collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
British Newspaper Archive – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1425)
tw-ref-ID · 
2015
published in · 
Ipswich Journal
date · 
17 October 1891
citation · 
whole 9310
content

For Evening Parties, S. Smith and Smith have received the most popular Season's Games, BEZIQUE, HALMA, TIDDLEDY WINKS, REVERSI. And New Games for the Season.

links · 
British Newspaper Archive – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1426)
tw-ref-ID · 
2016
Surrey • (county)
Surrey Mirror & County Post (newspaper)
location · 
Surrey, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
801

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Surrey Mirror & County Post.
published in · 
Surrey Mirror & County Post
date · 
11 November 1904
column title · 
ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS
title language · 
English
by · 
C. V. Diehl
citation · 
page 7 • column 1 (near bottom)
content

I have broken my rule this week and sent several replies by post. My excuse is that they were caases of urgency, and stamped addressed envelopes were enclosed. But it shall not happen again.—G. N. (Liverpool): "Counter Golf" is played in the manner of tiddly-winks.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
3771
Warwickshire • (county)
Leamington Spa, Warwickshire, England, United Kingdom
Leamington Spa Courier (newspaper)
location · 
Leamington Spa, Warwickshire, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
498

Toggle showing 2 tiddlywinks references for Leamington Spa Courier.
published in · 
Leamington Spa Courier
date · 
5 October 1889
title · 
Lenton's stationery and fancy stores
citation · 
volume 62 • issue 40 • page 1 • column 1 (3/4 down)
content

All the latest indoor games.

Halma, Spinnaker, Tiddledy Winks, Ludo, Flitterkins, Backgammon, Go Bang, Reversi, Chess, Draughts, &c., &c., &c.

Playing Cards and Card Games in great variety.

The noted Store for all the newest Puzzles.

Agents for Dr. Richter's "Anchor" stone building blocks.

19, Victoria Terrace, Leamington

collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
British Newspaper Archive – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1428)
tw-ref-ID · 
2020
published in · 
Leamington Spa Courier
date · 
12 October 1889
title · 
Lenton's stationery and fancy stores
citation · 
page 1 • column 5 (bottom)
content

All the latest indoor games.

Halma, Spinnaker, Tiddledy Winks, Ludo, Flitterkins, Backgammon, Go Bang, Reversi, Chess, Draughts, &c., &c., &c.

Playing Cards and Card Games in great variety.

The noted Store for all the newest Puzzles.

Agents for Dr. Richter's "Anchor" stone building blocks.

19, Victoria Terrace, Leamington

collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
links · 
British Newspaper Archive – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1430)
tw-ref-ID · 
2019
Rugby, Warwickshire, England, United Kingdom
Rugby Advertiser (newspaper)
location · 
Rugby, Warwickshire, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
521

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Rugby Advertiser.
published in · 
Rugby Advertiser
date · 
2 April 1965
citation · 
page 1
tw-ref-ID · 
2253
West Midlands • (county)
Birmingham, West Midlands, England, United Kingdom
Birmingham Daily Post (newspaper)
location · 
Birmingham, West Midlands, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
476

Toggle showing 2 tiddlywinks references for Birmingham Daily Post.
published in · 
Birmingham Daily Post
date · 
29 December 1890
title · 
Tiddledy Winks
citation · 
whole 10145 • page 2 • column 5
content

"TIDDLEDY WINKS."—I have not seen any very newly-invented gamns for the Christmas holidays, writes a lady, except that called "Halma," which has entirely superseded the once popular "Go Bang." "Halma" consists of four varieties of firmly-standing little "pawns," which have to be moved according to rules in the endeavour to rout any opponent from his quarters, and then to take possession of them. Then I see that boxes are sold containing all the necessary materials for a game of "Tiddledy Winks," which is amusing enough, and consists, as most of us know, of a little round basin or cup, a number of counters, and two or four large round discs, or counters, called "flippers," for with these the little counters are to be flipped into the basin, and those who flip in the most get the game. Just now we are all charmed with an enlarged and improved "Tiddledy Winks," introduced to us frcm Oxford by a certain "don," who says grave and reverend seigniors delight in thus exercising their skill when unobserved by undergrads or scuts, The only materials required are a substantial pack of cards and a hat-an ordinary gentleman's tall silk hat-which must be placed on the floor at a suitable and well-considered distance from a chair, on which each player takes his seat in turn, and tries with all his might to throw as many cards as he can, one by one, into the hat, until he has exhausted the pack. Those who succeed in lodging the most inside the hat win the game; and we sometimes play in groups or sides, carefully counting the contents of the hat after each player's throw is over, and keeping a record of the score. It sounds simple enough as I describe it to throw fifty-two cards into a hat, but it is far from being so. They fly in all directions but the right one, lodging on the rim of the hat, and are often very unmanageable; but, as practice makes perfect, I suspect some of our party have private reheareals in their bedrooms.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
links · 
British Newspaper Archive – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1372)
tw-ref-ID · 
1938
published in · 
Birmingham Daily Post
date · 
10 March 1900
column title · 
Books Received
title · 
Miscellaneous
subtitle · 
(not Fiction, Technical and Scientific, Educational, History and Biography, Travel, Theology and Religion, or Verse)
citation · 
whole 13024 • page 4 • column 8
content

The History of Tiddley Winks and Teky Tuss. (H. J. Drane.)

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
links · 
British Newspaper Archive – digitized image PDF (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 1373)
tw-ref-ID · 
1939
West Yorkshire • (county)
Bradford, West Yorkshire, England, United Kingdom
Bradford Telegraph & Argus (newspaper)
location · 
Bradford, West Yorkshire, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
477

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Bradford Telegraph & Argus.
published in · 
Bradford Telegraph & Argus
date · 
3 June 1980
title · 
Pam, 27, flips her way to the top
summary

About Pam Knowles

notes · 
Cited in Winking World 36, page 1, with a photocopy.
collection · 
photocopy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
1940
Worcestershire • (county)
Kinderminster, Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom
Kinderminster Shuttle (newspaper)
location · 
Kinderminster, Worcestershire, England, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
497

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Kinderminster Shuttle.
published in · 
Kinderminster Shuttle
date · 
10 August 2012 7:30 am
title · 
Tiddlyolympics gets into the spirit of the Games
citation · 
edition online
content
Color photograph of two young men with straws in their mouths, each blowing a wink through the water in a basin with barriers and goals.
Water winks: Participants competing in the water arena

THE first tiddlywinks Olympics-style games has been held in Kidderminster, with an ex-mayor opening the event.

The Tiddlyolympics, created by regulars at the King and Castle pub in Comberton Hill, featured an opening ceremony and medal presentations.

Events included water winks, a wink sprint and tiddlyhurdles, as well as jumping events long wink and short wink.

Competitor Des Lloyd said: “We just thought it would be good to have a different take on the Olympics It’s a bit quirky and a bit tongue in cheek.”

The Tiddlyolympics took place on ‘Super Saturday’ last weekend, allowing participants to attempt to rival Team GB’s six gold medals.

The Tiddlyolympics began with a rain delay but the weather improved to allow ex-mayor of Kidderminster Mike Smith to light the flame.

Mr Lloyd added: “We lit some candles as we didn’t have a cauldron. It was something we had been talking about it for about a month and a half.

“It was so much effort and would probably have been cheaper to go to London.”

collection · 
digital web page (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2018
Scotland
Aberdeen, Scotland, United Kingdom
Aberdeen Weekly Journal (newspaper)
location · 
Aberdeen, Scotland, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
530

Toggle showing 4 tiddlywinks references for Aberdeen Weekly Journal.
published in · 
Aberdeen Weekly Journal
date · 
30 November 1896
citation · 
whole 13055
content

McMILLAN'S (Successors to John Seivwright) Great Xmas Show, 151 Union Street.

GAMES! GAMES!! GAMES!!!

Halma, Word-making and Word-taking, Ludo, Reversi, Tiddley Winks, Happy Families, The Royal Mail, Spellicans, Snap, Kings and Queens, Dominoes, Draughtsmen, Chess, Solitaire, Lotto, Prisoner's Base, Round the World, Authors, Letters, World's History, English History, Golf, Prisonder of Zenda, and other amusing and educational games, from 6d to 15s.

tw-ref-ID · 
2265
published in · 
Aberdeen Weekly Journal
date · 
11 December 1896
citation · 
whole 13065
content

McMILLAN'S (Successors to John Seivwright) Great Xmas Show, 151 Union Street.

GAMES! GAMES!! GAMES!!!

Halma, Word-making and Word-taking, Ludo, Reversi, Tiddley Winks, Happy Families, The Royal Mail, Spellicans, Snap, Kings and Queens, Dominoes, Draughtsmen, Chess, Solitaire, Lotto, Prisoner's Base, Round the World, Authors, Letters, World's History, English History, Golf, Prisonder of Zenda, and other amusing and educational games, from 6d to 15s.

tw-ref-ID · 
2266
published in · 
Aberdeen Weekly Journal
date · 
16 December 1896
citation · 
whole 13069
content

McMILLAN'S (Successors to John Seivwright) Great Xmas Show, 151 Union Street.

GAMES! GAMES!! GAMES!!!

Halma, Word-making and Word-taking, Ludo, Reversi, Tiddley Winks, Happy Families, The Royal Mail, Spellicans, Snap, Kings and Queens, Dominoes, Draughtsmen, Chess, Solitaire, Lotto, Prisoner's Base, Round the World, Authors, Letters, World's History, English History, Golf, Prisonder of Zenda, and other amusing and educational games, from 6d to 15s.

tw-ref-ID · 
2267
published in · 
Aberdeen Weekly Journal
date · 
18 December 1896
citation · 
whole 13071 • page 8 • column 2
content

McMILLAN'S (Successors to John Seivwright) Great Xmas Show, 151 Union Street.

GAMES! GAMES!! GAMES!!!

Halma, Word-making and Word-taking, Ludo, Reversi, Tiddley Winks, Happy Families, The Royal Mail, Spellicans, Snap, Kings and Queens, Dominoes, Draughtsmen, Chess, Solitaire, Lotto, Prisoner's Base, Round the World, Authors, Letters, World's History, English History, Golf, Prisonder of Zenda, and other amusing and educational games, from 6d to 15s.

collection · 
digital copy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2268
Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom
Glasgow Herald (newspaper)
location · 
Glasgow, Scotland, UK
tw-pub-ID · 
531

Toggle showing 11 tiddlywinks references for Glasgow Herald.
published in · 
Glasgow Herald
date · 
30 November 1889
citation · 
page 9
tw-ref-ID · 
2269
published in · 
Glasgow Herald
date · 
24 December 1889
citation · 
issue 307
summary

Tiddledy-Winks, Flitterkins, and Spoof listed in advertisement

tw-ref-ID · 
2270
published in · 
Glasgow Herald
date · 
26 December 1889
citation · 
issue 309
summary

Tiddledy-Winks, Flitterkins, and Spoof listed in advertisement

tw-ref-ID · 
2271
published in · 
Glasgow Herald
date · 
30 December 1889
citation · 
issue 312
summary

Tiddledy-Winks and Spoof listed in advertisement

tw-ref-ID · 
2272
published in · 
Glasgow Herald
date · 
26 November 1890
citation · 
issue 283
summary

Flitterkins, Tiddledy Winks, Spoof Croquet, and Spoof Golf listed in advertisement

tw-ref-ID · 
2273
published in · 
Glasgow Herald
date · 
31 December 1890
citation · 
issue 313
summary

Flitterkins, Tiddledy Winks, Spoof Croquet, and Spoof Golf listed in advertisement

tw-ref-ID · 
2274
published in · 
Glasgow Herald
date · 
6 January 1893
citation · 
issue 5
summary

"Little Tiddledy Winks, coloured" in advertisement

tw-ref-ID · 
2275
published in · 
Glasgow Herald
date · 
16 November 1893
title · 
Messrs Copland & Lye's Christmas Show.
citation · 
issue 274 • column 7
content

A very important department, and a very favourite gift, is one or other of the numerous games which are now in the market. They not only appeal to both boys and girls, but are in some cases intellectual, and necessitate the powers of the mind being exercised to play them. 'Jolly Marbles,' a new example of this class, will be found diverting. Marbles, after being tossed about by clowns from hars on their heads, fall into holes, which are numbered. The player who succeeds in gaining the highest number is winner in the game. There is also a variation of the popular game 'Tiddley Winks.' The counter must be thrown into the hat of a clown—of whom thre are half-a-dozen. Our familiar friend 'M'Ginty' is to the fore again, this time with a ladder, on which he performs his antics. The 'Harmless Postol' is still as harmless and as popular as ever.

collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2276
published in · 
Glasgow Herald
date · 
5 November 1896
title · 
CHRISTMAS CARDS, &c.
citation · 
issue 266 • page 11 • column 4
content

Messrs G. [sic -correct C.] W. Faulkner & Co., 41 Jewin Street, London, have sent their budget of Christmas goods for the season.

The firm have issued a group of new games. 'Fighting for the Standard' combines chance and patriotism; while 'Attracts,' a fishing game, will create interest among young folks regarding the mysteries of the magnet. 'Attack and Defence' is an ingenuous variations [sic -correct ingenious variation] of 'Tiddley Winks,' and 'Nurky Turky' is a kind of combination of croquet and billiards for the table. 'Bluffing' is the title of a card game which will probably become popular. All the apparatus for the various games are well made, and any one of the series is sure to delight those into whose play hours it is introduced.

collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2277
published in · 
Glasgow Herald
date · 
8 February 1900
column title · 
PUBLISHERS' COLUMN.
title · 
NEW BOOKS OF THE WEEK.
subtitle · 
MISCELLANEOUS
citation · 
issue 34
content
"The True History of Tiddley Winks and Takey Tuss, Two Catties"' Edited by their Fond Mistress, also called "Kitty." (London: Henry J. Drane.)
collection · 
digitized image (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
2278
published in · 
Glasgow Herald
date · 
18 August 1997
by · 
Bill McArthur
content

National LOTTO Academy of Sporting Excellence

Offering Honours Degrees in...

  • Tiddlywinks
  • Ludo
  • Synchronizing drowing
  • Gut barging
  • Shove ha'penny
  • Snakes and ladders
  • Crying in beer
  • Blaming opposition
  • Criticising refs/umpires
Our world renowned footballers, rugby players and cricketers are clearly far too rich and successful to benefit from this scheme and are consequently excluded.

5

type · 
comic
tw-ref-ID · 
2279
Union of Soviet Socialist Republics
Pravda (newspaper)
location · 
Union of Soviet Socialist Republics
tw-pub-ID · 
772

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Pravda.
published in · 
Pravda
date · 
around 1950
summary

Article referenced by magazine L’Officiel des Jeux et Jouets, 13 Apr 1950, No. 13, page 24.

tw-ref-ID · 
2806
United States
(unknown) (newspaper)
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
162

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for (unknown).
published in · 
(unknown)
date · 
on or after 28 February 1972
title · 
Tabletop Trauma at Tiddlywinks Tourney
summary

After the 1972 Junior Continentals.

content source · 
Associated Press wirephoto
content
Black and white photograph from first annual Junior Continental Tiddlywinks Championship at Peekskill, New York.

tw-ref-ID · 
1106
Family Weekly (supplement)
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
13

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Family Weekly.
published in · 
Family Weekly
date · 
10 January 1982
title · 
WHAT IN THE WORLD
subtitle · 
TIDDLY TALLY
by · 
Eliot Kaplan
citation · 
page 26 • column 2
content source · 
United Press International (photograph only)
media type · 
photograph
media description

B&W photograph of a man shooting a wink in the air with a cup below, from UPI in the1960s.

collection · 
original (Drix/NATwA); digital copy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
519
Journal Newspapers (Montgomery County, Maryland, Fairfax County, Virginia, Arlington County, Virginia) (newspaper)
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
16

Toggle showing 2 tiddlywinks references for Journal Newspapers (Montgomery County, Maryland, Fairfax County, Virginia, Arlington County, Virginia).
published in · 
Journal Newspapers (Montgomery County, Maryland, Fairfax County, Virginia, Arlington County, Virginia)
date · 
29 June 1984
title · 
Winks
subtitle · 
Winkers 'tiddle-late' in tomorrow's tourney
by · 
Robert Doherty
citation · 
page B1
content source · 
United Press International
media description

Color photograph of Larry Kahn; black-and-white photograph of stroboscopic wink pot by Rick Tucker

keywords

Larry Kahn

collection · 
original (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
60
published in · 
Journal Newspapers (Montgomery County, Maryland, Fairfax County, Virginia, Arlington County, Virginia)
date · 
29 June 1984
title · 
Winkers turn out for Saturday tourney
citation · 
page B2
content source · 
United Press International
media description

Photograph of Larry Kahn

keywords

Larry Kahn

collection · 
original (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
61
Parade (supplement)
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
14

Toggle showing 2 tiddlywinks references for Parade.
published in · 
Parade
date · 
4 January 1959
content

All over the world and on the colonies in outer space, everyone is excited about the most popular event of the year. All human activity stops as people breathlessly await the outcome of the world's championship tiddlywinks contest.

In this world of the future mankind has little else to be excited about. For earth has been transformed into a "paradise" where incredibly clever robots take care of things. They do the farming, the factory work, run the trains, regulate traffic, enforce the law, cook the meals, clean the houses and distribute a vast wealth of goods and services to which every human being is entitled—merely by being alive.

links · 
link (free) (tw-ref-link-id 19)
tw-ref-ID · 
57
published in · 
Parade
date · 
14 April 1996
column title · 
Ask Marilyn
citation · 
page 12
content

G. Vitale, Mobile, Ala.

We plan to hold an elimination tournament with tiddlywinks, two people playing at a time.

collection · 
original (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
58
This Week Magazine (supplement)
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
15

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for This Week Magazine.
published in · 
This Week Magazine
date · 
4 November 1962
column title · 
Charlie Rice's Punchbowl
title · 
Tiddlywinks across the sea!
by · 
Charlie Rice
citation · 
page 20-21
media description

3 photographs, 1 drawing

keywords

Oxford

OUTS

1962 Oxford Tour

collection · 
transcript (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
59
Gannett newspapers (media company)
location · 
USA
tw-pub-ID · 
222

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Gannett newspapers.
published in · 
Gannett newspapers
date · 
around 26 December 1980
summary

Gannett newspapers picked up story that appeared in 1980 in the Rockford Register Star

tw-ref-ID · 
801
Alabama • (state)
Anniston, Alabama, United States
Anniston Star (newspaper)
location · 
Anniston, Alabama, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
18

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Anniston Star.
published in · 
Anniston Star
date · 
11 February 1940
title · 
Company A Of 10th Gets New Day Room
citation · 
page 4
content

The members of Company A, 10th Infrantry, have in the past week been working hard constructing a day room to be used for recreational purpose by members of their company.

Under the supervision of the noncommissioned officers the men built the room by raising a tent and covering the sides with weatherboarding and tar paper, which cost the company very little

The equipment in the room consists of a radio, six card tables, which are used for playing cards, and such games as bingo, tiddledy winks, dominoes and checkers. Other amusements include ping-pong, archery and skeet gun and targets.

tw-ref-ID · 
63
Birmingham, Alabama, United States
Birmingham News (newspaper)
location · 
Birmingham, Alabama, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
186

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Birmingham News.
published in · 
Birmingham News
date · 
26 October 1918
title · 
Indoor Sports For the Interned During the Influenza Epidemic
subtitle · 
No. 11—TIDDLEDY-WINKS.
by · 
Henry C. Vance
citation · 
page 6
content

This world is full of uncertainties, disappointments, mud and fake hair restorers. There are also quite a number of nuts scattered broadcast up and down the universe, but it is doubtful if there are many who still play the good old-fashioned game of Tiddledy-winks.

About the same time that knighthood was in flower, or probably a little later when Lord Cornwalis was in Dutch, Tiddledy-winks was all the rage. Life was one little excitement after another when our forefathers circled around the candle-flames and played Tiddledy-winks with the family until the late hour of 8:30 p.m. They then few prowling red-skins and deer before day-break [sic duplicate] and went out and shot a few prowling red-skins and deer before the clatter of the coffee-mill could be heard in the culinary department of the household.

Gatter Prod'em.

To play Tiddeldy-winks [sic] one must have an outfit especially constructed for said contest. Small round men, a little glass jar for a goal and another "man" as a "prod" make up the outfit. The goal is a certain distance from each contestant and four men are furnished the participants. By pressing with the "prod" on the edge of the men, they are snapped towards to goal. The lucky guy who gets all of his men in the cup with the fewest number of prods naturally wins the game.

In the good old days before the great drouth swept over the country and the major portion of it was declared bone dry, the winner after each contest sipped from a jug of rum. This was his privilege and it helped put interest in the game.

Quite an Art.

Tiddledy-winks never reached such a height in popularity that international contests for the championship of the world were staged, neither was a king ever dethroned on account of tiddledywinks, but it was highly amusing in its period and required a certain skill by the devotees of the art.

It might suffice to help kill time between noow and Monday week, when the theaters will be thrown open once again. Then we can revel in "vodevil" once more. We will then have the chance of seeing screen flickers and marvel at the grace displayed by the Lardly Arbuckle as he trips into view, accompanied by his girlish figure and his invisible waist line.

When the family sits at home
And there ain't a thing to do;
And you're bored from toe to dome,
You can blame it on the "flu."

collection · 
digital copy (NATwA)
links · 
University of Michigan (free) (tw-ref-link-id 213)
tw-ref-ID · 
557
Mobile, Alabama, United States
Mobile Register (newspaper)
location · 
Mobile, Alabama, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
19

Toggle showing 2 tiddlywinks references for Mobile Register.
published in · 
Mobile Register
date · 
14 December 1986
title · 
Holiday shoppers boggled by tiddlywinks players
by · 
Joyce A. Venezia
citation · 
page 18
summary

Coverage of Ocean City, New Jersey, tiddlywinks exhibition at a department store. Cites Larry Kahn, Jim Marlin, Rick Tucker.

content

Kahn, 33, of Silver Spring, Md., is the national tiddlywink champion and a former world champion.

collection · 
digital copy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
64
published in · 
Mobile Register
date · 
18 January 1991
title · 
Hard to talk of football while at war
citation · 
page 45
content

At what point does football become tiddlywinks?

Answer: As soon as there's war.

But when it's one's job to write about tiddlywinks, one writes about tiddlywinks, although one may not be entirely comfortable doing it. One tried to make the tiddlywinks sound interesting, while at the same time asking oneself: Who cares about tiddlywinks right now?

collection · 
digital copy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
65
Tuscaloosa-Newport, Alabama, United States
Tuscaloosa (newspaper)
location · 
Tuscaloosa-Newport, Alabama, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
20

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Tuscaloosa.
published in · 
Tuscaloosa
date · 
19 May 1959
title · 
Tiddlywinks Match Requires Practice
citation · 
page 16 • column 2
content source · 
Associate Press
content

SEATTLE, Wash. (AP) — Nine men and a girl are practicing like mad at the University of Washington these days in preparation for an international tiddlywink match with Cambridge University.

Dave Stern, manager of the Washington team, says the English school accepted the challenge in a letter from Frank G. Kenshaw [sic correct=Kershaw], honorary secretary of the Cambridge Tiddlywink Society. If financial arrangements can be made, Kenshaw said the West Coast contest would follow scheduled matches at Harvard, Yale, Dartmouth, Chicago and other universities.

Stern's team won its first collegiate match against Seattle University 19-9, and now is considering a challenge it has received from Washington faculty members.

collection · 
digital copy (NATwA)
links · 
Google Books (free) (tw-ref-link-id 20)
tw-ref-ID · 
66
Alaska • (state)
 (newspaper)
location · 
Alaska, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
21

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for .
published in · 
date · 
1972
content source · 
Associated Press
media description

photograph of the 1972 Junior Countinentals

tw-ref-ID · 
67
Arlington Heights • (state)
Illinois, Arlington Heights, United States
Daily Herald (newspaper)
publisher · 
Paddock Publications, Inc.
location · 
Illinois, Arlington Heights, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
294

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Daily Herald.
published in · 
Daily Herald
date · 
17 June 2002
title · 
Naperville tykes find new fun with old games
subtitle · 
'History Connection' shows what it was like to be a kid in the 1800s
by · 
Beth Sneller
publisher · 
Paddock Publications, Inc.
publisher country · 
USA
publisher location · 
Arlington Heights, Illinois
citation · 
volume 130 • section 1 • issue 246 • page 4 • column 3
content

It's really quite a simple game, tiddlywinks. All you have to do is maneuver one disc to flip another disc onto a little platform, and the closer you get to the center of the platform, the more points you get.

[...]Tiddlywinks is one of the many old games kids can try out at the historic village's new interactive exhibit in its Meeting House.

tw-ref-ID · 
1105
California • (state)
Berkeley, California, United States
Berkeley Gazette (newspaper)
location · 
Berkeley, California, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
22

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Berkeley Gazette.
published in · 
Berkeley Gazette
date · 
May 1976 ?
notes · 
Excerpt from the California Monthly magazine (University of California, Berkeley), March 1976
tw-ref-ID · 
68
Fresno, California, United States
Fresno Bee (newspaper)
location · 
Fresno, California, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
23

Toggle showing 4 tiddlywinks references for Fresno Bee.
published in · 
Fresno Bee
date · 
1 April 1972
title · 
Great Day! Fresnan Tiddles into History
citation · 
page 1
summary

About Tim Schiller.

keywords

Tim Schiller

tw-ref-ID · 
69
published in · 
Fresno Bee
date · 
February 1981
title · 
Breathing difficulty caused by a tiddlywink up the nose
content source · 
Associated Press
collection · 
photocopy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
70
published in · 
Fresno Bee
date · 
8 February 1981
title · 
Welcome to hard dimes
by · 
Eli Setenich
notes · 
3rd topic in column
collection · 
photocopy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
71
published in · 
Fresno Bee
date · 
1 March 1981
title · 
Bloody good show, men
by · 
Eli Setenich
notes · 
3rd topic in column
collection · 
photocopy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
72
Fresno Guide (newspaper)
location · 
Fresno, California, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
24

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Fresno Guide.
published in · 
Fresno Guide
date · 
Spring 1972
title · 
Ping pong & Tiddledywinks
by · 
Morrie Ryskind
summary

Editorial on detente alluding to world teams.

tw-ref-ID · 
73
Long Beach, California, United States
Long Beach Press-Telegram (newspaper)
location · 
Long Beach, California, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
25

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Long Beach Press-Telegram.
published in · 
Long Beach Press-Telegram
date · 
18 May 1959
title · 
It's Your World
citation · 
page A-2 • column 1
content source · 
Associated Press
content

SEATTLE (AP)—Nine men and a girl are practicing like mad at the University of Washington these days in preparation for an international tiddlywinks match with Cambridge University.

Dave Stern, manager of the Washington team, says the English school accepted the challenge in a letter from Frank G. Kenshaw [sic correct=Kershaw], honorary secretary of the Cambridge Tiddlywink Society. If financial arrangements can be made, Kenshaw [sic: should be Kershaw] said the West Coast contest would follow scheduled matches at Harvard, Yale, Dartmouth, Chicago, and other universities.

"Tiddlywinks is a sport, not a stunt," Kenshaw [sic correct=Kershaw] wrote, "as we hope to be able to prove to you... Gamesmanship is inapplicable."

Stern and his nine-man-one-girl team consider it a sport, too. They are busily trying to become ambidextrous (approved under international rules) and working on thumb development.

As in most sports, tiddlywinks has its own vocabulary. The squop is a tactical move to cover an opponent's tiddly and the pot is something you try to shoot in—not rake in.

Stern's team won its first intercollegiate match against Seattle University 19-9, and now is considering a challenge it has received from Washington faculty members.

collection · 
digital copy (NATwA)
links · 
NewspaperArchive.com (free) (tw-ref-link-id 21)
tw-ref-ID · 
74
Los Angeles, California, United States
Los Angeles Herald (newspaper)
location · 
Los Angeles, California, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
26

Toggle showing 5 tiddlywinks references for Los Angeles Herald.
published in · 
Los Angeles Herald
date · 
12 January 1891
title · 
The Latest Popular Game
citation · 
volume 35 • issue 90 • page 5 • column 4
content source · 
Springfield Homestead (Massachusetts)
content

It need not surprise any one to drop into an evening gathering or a quiet home circle and find people who wear spectacles across their noses and carry dignity by the ton trying to snap a row of ivory chips into a little wooden cup. That is the new game, christened tiddledy winks. It requires a small wooden cup called a wink pot and two dozen bone or ivory chips called winks, also four larger ones about the size of an old fashioned pants button, known as tiddledies. There is a cushion to snap the chips upon, or you can spread a small square of Brussels carpeting under the tablecloth, which answers just as well if not better. The trick is to snap the winks into the wink pot by means of the tiddledies held between the thumb and finger, the winks lying flat on the cushion or table. This is the game of the season - the great social snap, so to speak. There are two or three ways of playing and keeping tally of the game. Ever tried it? - Springfield (Mass.) Homestead.

collection · 
digital copy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
75
published in · 
Los Angeles Herald
date · 
18 January 1891
column title · 
PERSONAL
citation · 
volume 35 • issue 96 • page 7 • column 2
content

Miss Eloise Forman and Charles Forman, Jr., gave a "tiddledy winks" party on Saturday evening.

links · 
California DIgital Newspaper Collection (free) (tw-ref-link-id 22)
tw-ref-ID · 
76
published in · 
Los Angeles Herald
date · 
4 April 1892
column title · 
In Society
citation · 
volume 37 • issue 166 • page 3 • column 3
content

A very pleasant party was given by Mrs. A. M. Scott, Friday evening, April 1st, at her home on San Pedro Street, in honor of her niece Miss Pear M. Duke and her neice's [sic] friend Miss Anna Denisen of Erie, Kansas. The hall, parlors and dinning [sic] rooms were beautifully decorated with palms, smilax, lilies and roses. The chief amusements of the evening were music and progressive tiddledy winks, prizes being awarded to Mr. Morgan Galbreth, royal; Miss Nettie Royer, progressive and Miss Pearl Duke, booby. Among the guest noted were Mrs. Morrison and Scott, Misses Alpha McIlmoil, Pearl and Nettie Royer, Minnie and Myra Todd, Delphine and Amelia Santa Cruz, Kathrine Loomis, Anna Denisen and Pearl Duke. [sic] Messrs. F. Winn Sabichi, E. E. Galbreth, J. H. Owens, Morgan Galbreth, W. Humphreys, Colonel Scrieber, W. Clark, Horace Metcalf and Theo. Simpson of Pasadena.

collection · 
digital copy (NATwA)
links · 
California DIgital Newspaper Collection (free) (tw-ref-link-id 23)
tw-ref-ID · 
77
published in · 
Los Angeles Herald
date · 
7 April 1896
column title · 
Brevities
citation · 
volume 25 • issue 179 • page 3 • column 1
content

A progressive tiddledy-winks party was given Saturday evening by Mrs. Elson at her home on Cypress avenue in honor of the 15th birthday of her son Abbott. Easter eggs, prettily painted and decorate with ribbons were presented to the guests as souvenirs of the occasion and prizes were awarded as follows: Miss Josephine Davis secured ladies' first prize and Master Sidney Marx gentleman's first prize. Those carrying off the booby prizes were Miss Beth Sill and Master John Traylor. Hand-painted eggs were the prizes. Refreshments of ice cream and cake were served after the games.

collection · 
digital copy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
78
published in · 
Los Angeles Herald
date · 
7 March 1909
title · 
Spends Pleasant Day
citation · 
edition Junior Section • page 2 • column 3
content

[...] Often I play the games of tiddledy winks, jack straws and pins with my mother, father and sister.

VORIS H. CONNOR.

McKinely avenue school, grade A4, age 9. 947 E. Forty-eighth street.

links · 
Library of Congress (free) (tw-ref-link-id 24)
tw-ref-ID · 
79
Los Angeles Times (newspaper)
location · 
Los Angeles, California, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
27

Toggle showing 16 tiddlywinks references for Los Angeles Times.
published in · 
Los Angeles Times
date · 
7 December 1890
title · 
THE PEOPLE'S STORE.
subtitle · 
Our Place a Veritable Beehive of Industry.
citation · 
page 8 • column 2
content

Mammoth Toy Department

[...]

Our game booth consists of games from 5c upwards. We have the largest assortment of Tiddledy Winks in Southern California.

[...]

A. HAMBURGER & SONS

links · 
Gale Cengage Learning (free) (tw-ref-link-id 25)
tw-ref-ID · 
80
published in · 
Los Angeles Times
date · 
31 March 1972
title · 
TIDDLYWINKS
subtitle · 
U.S. Flips to World Title
citation · 
page 4
notes · 
Reprinted in in September 1972 MIT Observer
collection · 
transcript (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
81
published in · 
Los Angeles Times
date · 
2 April 1972
title · 
A STAR IS BORN
summary

About tiddlywinks as played in Logan, Utah (see Newswink 6).

tw-ref-ID · 
82
published in · 
Los Angeles Times
date · 
10 January 1992
column title · 
Consumer
title · 
Too Many Lists of Unsafe Toys?
by · 
S. J. Diamond
citation · 
edition Home Edition • page D-1
content

Toddlers find play value in everything—Barbies, tiddlywinks, Erector sets, Monopoly pieces, pennies, peanuts and paper clips.

collection · 
digital copy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
83
published in · 
Los Angeles Times
date · 
14 June 1992
column title · 
Movies
title · 
John Doe, Meet Ross Perot; Five decades later, Frank Capra's 'Meet John Doe' eerily resembles today's political scene—although Gary Cooper was taller
by · 
Jack Matthews
citation · 
edition Home Edition • page 5
content

Throughout the movie, John Doe's main theme is that free people can "beat the world at anything, from war to tiddlywinks, if we all pull in the same direction."

collection · 
digital copy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
84
published in · 
Los Angeles Times
date · 
25 July 1992
title · 
Olympic-Caliber Craziness; Volleyball Standout Samuelson Brings the Offbeat to Barcelona
by · 
Michael Grunwald
citation · 
edition Valley Edition • page C-12
content

"We could be playing tiddlywinks, and we'd start whaling on each other," says Rusen, who has broken several knuckles punching walls after losses.

collection · 
digital copy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
85
published in · 
Los Angeles Times
date · 
6 January 1993
column title · 
Fixations
title · 
Putting All His Cards on the Table
subtitle · 
Edward Labate would love to sell you baseball memorabilia, but he's the first one to tell you to collect for fun, not profit
by · 
Jim Washburn
citation · 
edition Orange County Edition • page E-1
content

That's where his passion lies, but, as he noted, "being a national chess master in the United States is like being a baseball card dealer in the Soviet Union. Who cares? It's like being a tiddlywinks champion. Chess is a game that requires involvement, and the No. 1 problem in this country is you have too many followers, too many viewers, tag-alongers instead of leaders."

collection · 
digital copy (NATwA)
links · 
Los Angeles Times – web page (free) (tw-ref-link-id 831)
tw-ref-ID · 
86
published in · 
Los Angeles Times
date · 
25 January 1993
title · 
The Strange Case of "Knight Moves"
by · 
Michael Wilmington
citation · 
edition Home Edition • page F-7
content

"Knight Moves" (MPAA rated R, for language, sensuality, violence) is a game—but it's closer to three-card monte or tiddlywinks than chess.

collection · 
digital copy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
87
published in · 
Los Angeles Times
date · 
14 May 1993
column title · 
Computer File
title · 
Edited-Just-for-You News Is Now Available in Your Desktop Computer Every Day
by · 
Lawrence J. Majid
citation · 
edition Home Edition • page D-2
content

Your sports page could be limited to baseball or could include football, hockey and tiddlywinks.

collection · 
digital copy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
88
published in · 
Los Angeles Times
date · 
23 July 1993
title · 
It's Not Just a Simple Game for Old Folks
subtitle · 
Lawn bowling: County residents who will play at Pacific championships say the sport is challenging and highly competitive
by · 
Barbie Ludovise
citation · 
edition Orange County Edition • page C-8
content

But lawn bowling? Sounded about as thrilling as a game of tiddlywinks.

collection · 
digital copy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
89
published in · 
Los Angeles Times
date · 
10 November 1993
title · 
Coaches' Tidbits Easier to Swallow at Lunchtime
by · 
Mike Penner
citation · 
edition Orange County Edition • page C-1
content

If you've never been to Titan Gym, we can play everything on that floor, including tiddlywinks, because it's marked for it.

collection · 
digital copy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
90
published in · 
Los Angeles Times
date · 
6 January 1994
column title · 
Fashion
title · 
Attire for Bicyclists Slowly Going From Nerdy to Pleasing; Retailers say better designs are coming out. And teen-agers are adding visors to improve the look of helmets
by · 
Kathleen Williams
citation · 
edition Ventura West Edition • page J-1
content

Do you find the term nerd irresistible? Not that cycling is a wimpy, undeserving pastime, a tiddlywinks kind of sport.

collection · 
digital copy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
91
published in · 
Los Angeles Times
date · 
27 January 1994
column title · 
inside line
title · 
Brain Teasers
citation · 
edition Orange County Edition • page E-3
content

1. What game involves potting and squopping?

1. Tiddlywinks

collection · 
digital copy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
92
published in · 
Los Angeles Times
date · 
19 July 1994
title · 
Shaken and Stirred; The Quake Jolted Business for Some Shops Near Epicenter, While Giving Others a Boost
by · 
Patrice Apodaca
citation · 
edition Valley Edition • page 12
content

She sells the POGS for 15 cents to $2 apiece—along with thicker discs called "slammers" that are used to play a tiddlywinks-type game with the POGs.

collection · 
digital copy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
95
published in · 
Los Angeles Times
date · 
30 July 1994
title · 
O.C. POP MUSIC REVIEW
subtitle · 
A Different Brand of Fabulous
by · 
Jim Washburn
citation · 
edition Orange County Edition • page F-1
content

As throughout most of the evening, he didn't use a pick, instead coaxing meaty tones from his strings with an odd approach to finger-picking, his digits flicking at the strings as if they were tiddlywinks.

collection · 
digital copy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
93
published in · 
Los Angeles Times
date · 
16 September 1994
column title · 
Consumer Affairs
title · 
A Hot Tip for Coffee Lovers: Most Retailers Prefer to Make It Scalding
by · 
Denise Gellene
citation · 
edition Home Edition • page D-3
content

Kids stack POGs and knock them over in a game that is a cross between tiddlywinks and baseball card flipping.

collection · 
digital copy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
94
San Diego, California, United States
San Diego Union-Tribune (newspaper)
location · 
San Diego, California, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
28

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for San Diego Union-Tribune.
published in · 
San Diego Union-Tribune
date · 
11 August 2012 4 pm
title · 
The need to compete
by · 
John Wilkens
content

Sunday, when the Summer Olympics in London end, you'll have to forgive Abram Burrows for not paying attention. The 11-year-old from Santee is in Hawaii competing for his own world championship.

In Pokémon, the video game. [...]

Eating, napping, crying, texting — they’ve all had their own contests. What next, tiddlywinks?

Too late. There's a world championship for that, too.

links · 
San Diego Union-Tribune (free) (tw-ref-link-id 26)
tw-ref-ID · 
96
San Francisco, California, United States
Daily Evening Bulletin (newspaper)
location · 
San Francisco, California, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
31

Toggle showing 3 tiddlywinks references for Daily Evening Bulletin.
published in · 
Daily Evening Bulletin
date · 
14 February 1891
title · 
To-day's Advertisements
citation · 
issue 110 • page 2 • column 8
content

FRESH ARRIVAL

—OF THE—Popular Parlor Game TIDDLEDY WINKS—AND—Tiddledy Winks Tennis

ALL SIZES, 25c, 50c and $1.

[...]

DAVIS BROTHERS, 718 Market st. and 1234 Market st.

collection · 
digital image (NATwA)
links · 
Gale Cengage Learning (tw-ref-link-id 28)
tw-ref-ID · 
100
published in · 
Daily Evening Bulletin
date · 
17 February 1891
title · 
EVENTS IN SOCIETY
citation · 
issue 12 • page 2 • column 2
collection · 
to be retrieved
tw-ref-ID · 
101
published in · 
Daily Evening Bulletin
date · 
21 February 1891
title · 
To-day's Advertisements
citation · 
issue 116 • page 2 • column 6
content

FRESH ARRIVAL

—OF THE—Popular Parlor Game TIDDLEDY WINKS—AND—Tiddledy Winks Tennis

ALL SIZES, 25c, 50c and $1.

[...]

DAVIS BROTHERS, 718 Market st. and 1234 Market st.

collection · 
to be retrieved
links · 
Gale Cengage Learning (tw-ref-link-id 29)
tw-ref-ID · 
102
The Morning Call (newspaper)
location · 
San Francisco, California, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
29

Toggle showing 2 tiddlywinks references for The Morning Call.
published in · 
The Morning Call
date · 
21 December 1890
title · 
TIDDLEDY WINKS.
subtitle · 
The New Game That Is All the Rage in Fashionable Society East.
citation · 
volume 69 • issue 21 • page 7 • column 2
content source · 
Cincinnati Enquirer
content

It is the latest fad in society.

All the ladies are talking about tiddledy winks and learning to play it.

In the East it has become a veritable craze, and all social affairs are considered dull and insipid unless tiddledy winks is introduced.

Already it is the prime subject of gossip among the ladies in this city, and the first question the fair ones ask when they meet is, "How are you getting along with tiddledy winks? Have you learned it yet?" Then they compare experiences as to the best way of playing tiddledy winks. It is a very simple game, easily learned, and yet requires sufficient skill to make it interesting. There are many reasons why it should be the ruling winter game. New features are being added to increase the complications, and consequently the skill required. One of these features is a miniature tennis court, but the original tiddledy winks will be found sufficiently entertaining. The complications can come later.

One, two, three or four persons may play the game. It is all the more pleasing when the players are divided into partners. It is necessary to have a table, covered with cloth. A round table is probably the best, as it enables the players to arrange themselves more comfortably.

The implements are tiddledies, winks, a wink-pot and counters. A tiddledy is a thin disk of bone or ivory and about the size of a twenty-five-cent piece. A wink is a disk of the same material, but small, being about the size of a ten-cent piece.A wink-pot is a little wooden vessel, like a tiny bucket, with an opening the size of a silver dollar, and about an inch deep. There are little pads, somewhat resembling the "cheating rags" urchins use in playing marbles. The idea is to press on the wink with the tiddledy and make it jump into the wink-pot. The tiddledies are of various colors, with winks of corresponding hues. The pads are of colored silk, and as pretty as taste may suggest. The counters are of colored pressed pasteboard. When the players are ready to begin each takes a tiddledy and six winks, and the counters are equally divided among them. Then each contributes an agreed-upon number of counters to a pool, which is placed in charge of one of the players. The wink-pot is placed in the middle of the table. The object is to jump as many winks into the pot as possible. Each plays in turn to the left, the one to lead being decided by lot. The player places his or her pad at any distance from the wink-pot and jumps six winks one after another, paying no attention to those which fail to go into the pot. The winks lie flat on the pad, and the player holding the tiddledy by the thumb and first two fingers presses with its edge upon the wink. As the tiddledy slips it causes the wink th jump. The best result is produced by resting the tiddleddy [sic] on the center of the wink and drawing it back under slight pressure. A little practice will enable a player to jump a wink a distance of several feet and a foot or more in the air.

For each wink landed in the wink-pot the player received one counter from the pool. If he sends four or more winks into the pot in succession he makes a "run" and receives one extra counter from the pool for each wink over three put in on a run. If he jumps six winks into the pot in succession he makes a "sweep" and receives, besides the counters taken from the pool, one from each opponent.

All counteres received, except one for each wink put into the wink-pot, should be kept separately, so as to tally the winks jumped into the pot. If a player fails on six jumps to land a single wink in the pot, he pays two counters to the pool.

After each player has jumped his six winks, then the first player takes any wink lying outside the pot, places it where he pleases and makes it jump. If it goes in, he tries another. As soon as he fails the player next to the left proceeds in the same manner.

So the game goes on until all the winks have been jumped into the pot. The player putting the largest number of winks into the wink-pot in one turn takes one-half the counteres remaining in the pool, the remaining half going to the players having put the greatest number of winks in the pot. A tie is decides by the two contestants jumping six winks each, the one winning that lands the most of them.

The counters may be given any value agreed upon, as in poker, or if the game is purely for fun, the playing having the greatest number of counters when the last wink is landed in the pot of course wins.

The game enables ladies with long, tapering fingers to dislay them to the best advantage.—Cincinnati Enquirer.

media description

illustration of a hand shooting a wink off a cushion toward a cup, with a dotted line showing the path of the wink. Other winks are shown waiting nearby.

collection · 
digital copy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
97
published in · 
The Morning Call
date · 
15 February 1891
title · 
Games for Indoor Amusement
subtitle · 
The Latest Recreations Devised for the Home Circle
citation · 
volume 69 • issue 77 • page 13-16 (one page) • column 6
content

Chasing Indians Out West - Military Maneuvers and Migration on a Painted Board. Games That Require Skill.

The Latest Craze

Tiddledy Winks is one of the most fun-provoking games of a class differing altogether from the board games, all of which, by the way, bear a relationship more or less remote to chess and checkers. It is too well known to need description. A capital improvement, however, is tiddledy winks tennis, in which a felt cloth, accurately marked out as a miniature lawn tennis court is used, and a net in the center takes the place of the original cup. The small counters are "served" over the net by means of the new one, and the method of scoring is that employed in lawn tennis. Beginners usually give their opponents the first few games by a succession of "faults," but practice soon begets skill at this curious pastime.

collection · 
digital copy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
98
San Francisco Chronicle (newspaper)
location · 
San Francisco, California, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
30

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for San Francisco Chronicle.
published in · 
San Francisco Chronicle
date · 
10 December 1893
title · 
IDEAS FOR CHRISTMAS.
citation · 
page 4 • column 4
content

New Styles in Dolls—Games of the Season—The Donkey Dodge.

"Over the Garden Wall: is the latest game and is a form of Tiddledy-Winks" played with chips.

collection · 
digital copy (NATwA)
links · 
Fold3 (subscription) (tw-ref-link-id 27)
tw-ref-ID · 
99
San Francisco Examiner (newspaper)
location · 
San Francisco, California, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
32

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for San Francisco Examiner.
published in · 
San Francisco Examiner
date · 
May 1976 ?
title · 
Sports for Weekend - Football & Tiddlywinks
summary

About the First Far Eastern Tournament.

tw-ref-ID · 
103
Torrance, California, United States
Daily Breeze (newspaper)
location · 
Torrance, California, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
34

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Daily Breeze.
published in · 
Daily Breeze
date · 
16 December 1986
title · 
Serious child's play, Tiddlywinks champions go for the jugular with a passion
subtitle · 
Coverage of the tiddlywinks demonstration event in Ocean City, New Jersey
content

OCEAN CITY, N.J.—Larry Kahn watched his opponent get nurdled almost immediately, so he didn't dare pot his own wink. Instead he shot so he could squop and piddle later. The jargon boggled holiday shoppers passing by the table at a department store where Kahn and two other members of the North American Tiddlywinks Association were exhibiting their skills recently. [...]

tw-ref-ID · 
105
Torrance Herald (newspaper)
location · 
Torrance, California, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
35

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Torrance Herald.
published in · 
Torrance Herald
date · 
19 December 1929
by · 
R. F. Hogue
citation · 
column 1
content

'Twas the Nights after Christmas! [...]

GAMES

  • Modern Authors
  • Rummy
  • Tiddledy Winks
  • Dominoes
  • Blox-O
  • [...]
tw-ref-ID · 
106
Colorado • (state)
Colorado Springs, Colorado, United States
Colorado Springs Sun (newspaper)
location · 
Colorado Springs, Colorado, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
36

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Colorado Springs Sun.
published in · 
Colorado Springs Sun
date · 
20 February 1981
title · 
Et cetera
subtitle · 
Flicking your wink
content source · 
Philadelphia Bulletin
tw-ref-ID · 
107
Denver, Colorado, United States
Rocky Mountain News (newspaper)
alternate name · 
The Daily News
location · 
Denver, Colorado, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
37

Toggle showing 6 tiddlywinks references for Rocky Mountain News.
published in · 
Rocky Mountain News
date · 
14 December 1890
title · 
The Fair
subtitle · 
COLOSSAL COMBINATION SALE OF S. PELTON & BROS.'
citation · 
page 17 • column 5 (middle)
content

GAMES, PUZZLES, TOY BLOCKS, ETC.

Games Games Games

[...]

  • Tiddledy Winks
  • The Greatest Game of modern days.

Just received the Newest and Improved Edition FOR Six Players, only 58c

[...]

P. MONASH

links · 
Gale Cengage Learning (tw-ref-link-id 31)
tw-ref-ID · 
108
published in · 
Rocky Mountain News
date · 
21 December 1890
title · 
Society
subtitle · 
TIDDLEDY-WINKS TOURNAMENT.
citation · 
page 10 • column 2
content

On Thursday afternoon Miss Eicholtz entertained her friends at the family residence, Champa and Fourteenth streets.

A Tiddledy-Winks tournament was the amusement planned. The players occupied nine tables, and there was great sport.

Miss Coffey and Miss Marion Smith won first prizes—lovely balls of pure white chrysanthemums.

The booby prizes, cups and saucers, fell to Miss Annie Mechlin and Mrs. Howells of Fort Logan.

[...]

collection · 
digital image (NATwA)
links · 
Gale Cengage Learning (tw-ref-link-id 32)
tw-ref-ID · 
109
published in · 
Rocky Mountain News
date · 
21 December 1890
title · 
TIDDLEDYWINKS.
subtitle · 
The New Parlor Game, Which Has Become a Craze
citation · 
page 35 • column 4
content

"Progressive euchre has had its day, but it isn't in it any more. In fact, there is no game now but "tiddledywinks," and I'm getting so that I can play that with my eyes shut."

This is the way a young society man of Brooklyn spoke of the new fad, says the New York Journal.

"It's a great game," he said, "and lots of fun. Everybody is playing it and a knowledge of the game is almost as essential as knowing how to dance."

The new game of tiddledywinks is an imported one and in its origin is quite English. The American game has been modified somewhat from its London original and is arranged so that more players can take part.

The name is apparently nonsensical and its origin is only to be explained by deduction. Small ivory chips are jumped by striking them on the edge with a larger chip, and the object of the game is to make them fall into a small "wink" pot in the center of the table.

Every girl winks when her chip jump, so the small chips are called "winks." The

Illustration of a circular table top with a pot at center and 6 winks shooting stations around the periphery. Each shooting station has 6 small winks, a shooting pad, and a squidger on the shooting pad.

How Tiddledywinks Is Played.

large chips are jumpers, and this suggests the baby appellation for an altogether different kind of jumper, and so they are called "tiddledys." At least this is the explanation which a Fifth avenue girl gave her country cousin a few days ago.

The new game is very popular and has become quite a craze.

From two to six persons can play, but the more the better as well as merrier, when arranged as partners.

The wink-pot is placed In the center of the table. It is a small cup, barely two Inches In diameter. If a mat or heavy tablecloth is used the only other "impiements” are the winks, the tiddledys and all number of pasteboard counters. If not, each player is provided with a small pad or mat about three by four inches from which to jump the winks.Each player has six winks. The mats are placed at an equal distance from the wink-pot. A wink is put on the mat, and the player holding one of the tiddledys hits or presses with its edge upon the wink, causing it to jump. The best result is secured by resting the tiddledy on the Wink and drawing it backward. The wink may be make [sic correct=made] to jump several feet in this way. The science comes in so gauging the pressure that the wlnk will fall In the pot. If It goes beyond, the player must jump it back.

One plays until he fails to put a wink in, and then the turn passes. Partners may kelp each other. The object in the English game is to get ail the winks in, and the one who is through first tallies one for every wink left on the table when they are through.

It often happens that a wink falls on that of another player. The under one cannot be touched, and the owner of the upper one may play all the rest in before trying that and setting the under one free.

In the American game each wink jumped in the pot counts one. At the start a pool is formed, each player anteing seven count-

Illustration of a hand holding a squidger on a wink that is on a shooting pad.

Making the Play.

ers. Each plays his own six winks the first round. After that he plays any winks he chooses, and as long as he can put winks in tne pot. If he falls to put a wink in in six trials he forfeits two counters to the pool. If he clears the table he can take out of the pot as many as he can put back.

Four winks in succession form a run, and for every wink in a run over three the player reaeives [sic correct=receives] an extra counter from the pool. When the winks are all in the player who has made the largest run and the one putting in the largest number of winks divide the pool equally.

Both the English and American games are played, so as to give variety, and the game is also made more interesting by varying the distances at which the mats are placed from the wink-ot at the start-out. Sometimes a line ten inches in diameter is drawn around the wink-pot, and winks falling in it have to be left until all others are in. This ring is called the dead line.

The game is quick and lively, requires considerable skill and the score is easily kept. This makes it especially entertaining as a "progressive" game with several tables.

notes · 
Long article with two illustrations
collection · 
digital image (NATwA)
links · 
Gale Cengage Learning (tw-ref-link-id 33)
tw-ref-ID · 
110
published in · 
Rocky Mountain News
date · 
11 January 1891
citation · 
page 10 • column 4
collection · 
to be retrieved
tw-ref-ID · 
111
published in · 
Rocky Mountain News
date · 
14 January 1891
citation · 
page 5 • column 4
collection · 
to be retrieved
tw-ref-ID · 
112
published in · 
Rocky Mountain News
date · 
15 January 1891
citation · 
page 5 • column 1
collection · 
to be retrieved
tw-ref-ID · 
113
Connecticut • (state)
Bristol, Connecticut, United States
Bristol Press (newspaper)
location · 
Bristol, Connecticut, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
38

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Bristol Press.
published in · 
Bristol Press
date · 
early 1977
summary

About the NATwA Continentals tournament.

tw-ref-ID · 
114
Hartford, Connecticut, United States
Hartford Courant (newspaper)
location · 
Hartford, Connecticut, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
39

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Hartford Courant.
published in · 
Hartford Courant
date · 
16 December 1978
title · 
MIT Finds Fulfillment in Tiddlywinks
subtitle · 
Then There Was Sunshine, Ferdinand the Bull and Winky
citation · 
page 51, 55
notes · 
Same article as in Newsday on 14 December 1978
collection · 
transcript (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
115
Meridien, Connecticut, United States
Record Journal (newspaper)
location · 
Meridien, Connecticut, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
40

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Record Journal.
published in · 
Record Journal
date · 
31 July 2008
title · 
Tiddlywinks
tw-ref-ID · 
116
Middlefield, Connecticut, United States
Town Times (newspaper)
location · 
Middlefield, Connecticut, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
41

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Town Times.
published in · 
Town Times
date · 
18 July 2008
title · 
Tiddlywinks
tw-ref-ID · 
117
Southington, Connecticut, United States
The Southington Citizen (newspaper)
location · 
Southington, Connecticut, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
42

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for The Southington Citizen.
published in · 
The Southington Citizen
date · 
18 July 2008
title · 
Tiddlywinks
tw-ref-ID · 
118
District of Columbia • (district)
Washington, District of Columbia, United States
Washington Daily News (newspaper)
location · 
Washington, District of Columbia, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
43

Toggle showing 1 tiddlywinks reference for Washington Daily News.
published in · 
Washington Daily News
date · 
18 March 1959
title · 
Aim at Tiddly-Winks Title
content source · 
United Press International
tw-ref-ID · 
119
Washington Herald (newspaper)
location · 
Washington, District of Columbia, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
49

Toggle showing 2 tiddlywinks references for Washington Herald.
published in · 
Washington Herald
date · 
13 February 1908
title · 
S. KANN SONS & Co. 8th ST. & PA. AVE.
subtitle · 
Have fun at night
citation · 
page 7 • column 5
content

Tiddledy Winks, usual 15c kind, for… 10c

collection · 
digital copy (NATwA)
links · 
Library of Congress (free) (tw-ref-link-id 56)
tw-ref-ID · 
223
published in · 
Washington Herald
date · 
8 January 1921
citation · 
page 4 • column 2 (near bottom)
content

The naval balloonists who are returning from Canada will probably be satisfied to stay home and play tiddledy-winks for a while.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
links · 
Library of Congress (free) (tw-ref-link-id 53)
tw-ref-ID · 
220
Washington Post (newspaper)
location · 
Washington, District of Columbia, USA
tw-pub-ID · 
44

Toggle showing 53 tiddlywinks references for Washington Post.
published in · 
Washington Post
date · 
13 December 1890
title · 
A NEW SOCIAL CRAZE
subtitle · 
Tiddle-de Wink Calculated to Produce Brain Softening
citation · 
page 4
content source · 
Reprinted from the Chicago Evening Post
content

Chicago Evening Post: Society is just getting ready to go daft over a new craze that will be known among the elect as a tiddle-de wink social. It is positively idiotic. It will induce softouing of the brain quicker than any social fad in existence. Progressive euchre is a brilliant intellectual achievement beside it. There is no reason why the public should know any of these tiddle-de wink details unless to demonstrate how little a thing can agitate a crowd of intelligent men and women. But so long as society would indorse it and adopt it no act is too frivolous or too absurd to be formally recognized as the proper caper. Society, fashionable society, and its inexplicable notions, are responsible for the dwarfing of many an intellectual growth and the perversion of many a healthy faculty. Men and women need in these practical times more healthful recreation than performances like these.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
120
published in · 
Washington Post
date · 
4 January 1891
title · 
DOWN IN THE PARQUET
subtitle · 
A Sample Theater Party and Its Night at the Huguenots
citation · 
page 14
summary

Refers to a "Miss Tiddledywinks".

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DRAMATIS PERSONÆ—Mrs. Chelsea, who sees the opera perhaps once in the season from an orchestra chair, and who during the rest of the year regales her neighbors with detailed facts and incidents about every opera produced; habitually speaks of society as if it were spelled with a capital S.

Mr. Chelsea, her husband, known as “John," who feelsthat grand opera at $3 a seat is a sinful waste of money when there are so many of Hoyt's unique dramas to be seen for half the price.

Their daughter, known as “Missy,” who has appeared for one consecutive night in an amateur societiy play, and who hopes, because of her “willowy beauty,” to marry into the Four Hundred some day. Miss Tiddledywinks, her dear friead, to whom everything in life is either perfectly lovely, or perfectly horrid. >/p>

Before the performance: Mrs. C.–O, dear, John, why did you insist on coming so early? It is not good form to arrive here before the end of the first act.

John—Huh! Seems to me it is good form to come before tike show begins, so as not to incommode other folks.

Mrs. C. (with a kittenish manner, but with a baleful glitter in her eye, which bodes ill for John when he gets home)—O, yon prosaic old monster! As if people in society ever thought of other people’s convenience. (Tapping Miss T. with her fan.) My dear, I hope you do not get tired of the opera, as I confess I do sometimes. But of course one has to go, you know.

Miss T.—O, no. I just adore the opera; it i is so perfectly lovely and grand.

John (aside)—Why don’t she finish by I saying “gloomy and peculiar?”

Missy (patronizing, but kindly)—After all, though, it is not the opera, but society, that we come to see. Let me see (glancing at the programme), “The Huguenots” is a rather light opera, I believe.

John (who has been looking over the libretto)—Yes, it does seem to be rather light; only one person is killed. In a real heavy opera I believe they get away with as many as a dozen.

Mrs. C.—John, how; can you? O! there is dear Herr Seidl. I am so glad he is going to wield the baton to-night. Are you a member of the Seidl Society, Miss Tiddledywinks?

Miss T—No; mamma disapproves of such things; says they are Bohemian; but I know it must be .perfectly lovely.

Mrs. C., (who doesn’t belong to the Seidl Society, either)—O, indeed it is. We have such soulful meetings, and Herr Seidl does throw so much light on the old maestros. I was saying only yesterday to Mrs. Lancaster—she is one of the leaders of the Four Hundred, you know—that (the remark having little intrinsic value need not be repeated). [The rest of this article has not been proofread.] Missy (whispering to her mother)—Be careful not to look to the left. The Van Dormers have just arrived in their box, and I don't want them to see us down here In the orchestra. Mrs. C. (whisperingly)—Certainly not, my dear. John—Hello, there’s old Van Dormer and his women folks up there in a box looking just as solemn as when he passes the plate in onr church. Mrs. C. (peremptorily)—John, please don’t look at people in the boxes; it is bad form. John—Huh! Guess they wouldn't feel very happy if they weren’t looked at. Mrs. C.—John! (Critically examining the people around her through her quizzing glasses.) I suppose all these people come to hear the music. Horrid to be down here, isn’t it, Miss Tiddledywinks? Bat you see we were out of town when the boxes were sold, and so we were not able to get one this year. They say these Germans actually hiss when society people indulge in & little conversation. (Raising her voice for the benefit of two unmistakable German gentlemen in front of her.) I thing they are horrid. I quite expect they will hiss at us before the performance is over. How little some people can appreciate society. John (aside)—Great Scott! what fools women make of themselves about society! (Aloud) Well. I’ll bo blamed if there isn’t Bill Knuckle, our butcher, and his wife over there in one of those boxes on tho ground floor. Tell you there must be heaps of money m the meat business. Mrs. C.—John! You should never point; it is bad form. John—It is, hey? Well, when 1 pointed to a sealskin sacque last week, in Wolf & Miuk’B stores, and said you could have it, you didn’t say anything about its being bad form. Mrs. C. (laughing nervously)—Really, Miss Tiddledywinks, my husband is a dear old bear. But, as Mrs. Lancaster said to me yesterday, business men in this country have so little time to devote to the niceties of society. John (below his breath)—Society be darned. AFTER THE FIRST ACT. Mrs. C. (in the tone of one who knows it all)—What an advance there has been In musical taste! A few years ago in the old Academy we applauded the jingles of the Italian opera, and here to-night we i listen to one of Vogner’s masterpieces Mary (in tv horrified whisper)—For Heaven's sake, mamma, what are you saying? Vogner didn’t write “The Huguenots.” Mrs. C. (conscious that the two ffermau gentlemen in front are softly laughing)— That is, of course, we might listen to one of Vogners masterpieces, and drink in all its siibtle beauty, if it happened tq be given. Miss T. (rapturously)—O, I do think Vogner is just too lovely for anything! Mamma thiDks he is too noisy, and says that as a matter of 'enjoyment she would prefer to hear the college boys yell at a football game, because their yells mean something. But mamma Is horridly old-fashioned, you know; and besides music always gives her a headache. The doctor says her nerve centers are anti-melodic or something. Are you enjoying the opera, Mr. Chelsea? John—To tell you the cold truth. Miss Tiddledy winks, I like the double quartet in the “Old Homestead” much better. Mrs. C—John, I am surprised at you. John (defiantly)—That’s all right, Maria, but you know I never did like this opera business, where they take three hours to tell a story you don’t care a button to hear in a language you don’t understand. Mrs. C—You dear old goose, wo go to the opera because It is a society function. John—Well, if the actors talked United States and the hand played Annie Laurie, couldn’t you have your society functiou just ns well? Missy—O, papa, you are so funny. (Whispering) Don’t make a fool of yourself. Miss T.—Mamma would like Mr. Chelsea ever so much She would call him a typical American. Mrs. C.—O, dear, some horrid men are going to squeeze past us. There ought to be a law against such annoyances. John (seeing his chance to make a point) —Why, Maria, you said a little while ago that in society nobody ever thought of other people’s convenience. Mrs. C. (seeing a chance to make a counter-point)—Of course not, but those men are not in society, and therefore they are bound to think of the convenience of others. Common people should always be polite and deferential to society people. John (under his breath)—O Lord. AFTER THE PERFORMANCE. Mrs. C.—So glad we have had the pleasure of your company to-night, Miss Tiddledywinks. We always try to have friends with us when we go to the opera. (Aside) ; Well, we have paid the Tiddledy winks for Missy’s visit to their country place last summer. I wonder if the giri is as much a fool as she looks. ‘ Mias T. (who is not as much of a fool as she looks)—O dear, Mrs. Chelsea, it was so lovely of you to invite me. I shall never never forget your kinoness. (Aside) * Of* I T)ftWN TM TITR PATJfiTTRT the ridiculous, affected fools I hare v/ x an ±1XXJ AxXlkVaiUJjl ever seen this woman is the worst! Missy—Well, I can't say I think much of the acting to-night; there are amateurs in ‘•our set’rwho could do much better. John—So far as I am concerned I to Ink “The Texas Steer” goes away ahead of this show. Mrs. C.—John, it is not good form to speak of the opera as a “show.” John—Well, mebbe not; the show was in the boxes, and. with all respect to society, I think it was a blamed poor show. Mrs. C.—Miss Tiddledywinks. I hope you don't take Mr. Chelsea seriously. He has really enjoyed himself immensely tonight, bat he will have his joke.. Miss T.—O, I think it is perfectly lovely to listen to Mr. Chelsea. As mamma would say. he has so much horse sense. John—Well, * girls, get your wraps on while I step outside nnd induce some pirate to yell for our carriage.—New York Tribune.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
notability rating · 
not tiddlywinks
tw-ref-ID · 
121
published in · 
Washington Post
date · 
15 February 1891
title · 
Tiddledywinks and Dancing
citation · 
page 5
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Miss Josie Arnold, of 1312 G street northwest, gave a very delightful Tiddledy-winks party on Friday evening. At the conclusion of the games refreshments were served, and the remainder of the evening was spent in dancing and social enjoyment. Those present were Misses Heath, L. Gowans, Alice Gowans, Brooks, Kane, Masters, McGrath, Florence Arnold, Marshall, Craig, Prince, Cusack and Riddleberg; Messrs. Cralle, Steele, Daly, Behrens, Yelverten, Brennan, Emerson, Davis, Craig, Riddleberger, and Murphy.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
notability rating · 
interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
3775
published in · 
Washington Post
date · 
22 November 1896
title · 
A FAD FOR "PILLOW-DEX."
subtitle · 
Bostons New Parlor Game that Rivals "Tiddledy Winkss" [sic]
citation · 
page 24
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From the Boston Herald.

When you enter a room and And a party of hilarious and excited people franetically striking a balloon back and forth across a line, do not have suspicions ot their sanity, they are simply playing “Pillow-Dex!”

“Pillow-Dex” is the most crazily delightful of all the games which have become popular fads. Not even “Tlddledy Winks” or the “Pike’s Peak Puzzle” craze, which emanated from the same source, made so rapid a success!

Many a merry “Pillow-Dex” party has taken place In the Back Bay during the last two weeks, and so exciting was the fun that the fad spread with .phenomenal rapidity. It Is safe to say that "Pillow-Dex” is making things lively in thousands of homes around Boston.

The toy shops, news stands, and game counters in the large dry goods stores can hardly supply the demand for the inexpensive little game, which every one Is so anxious to play.

No one can appreciate the excitement and jolly fun of “Pillow Dex” who has not played it. To see a usually demure lady or grave and dignified old man wildly beating the ear, in hopes to strike the “Pillow-Dex” balloon, is calculated to incite glee in the most somber of countenances.

And the balloon—back and forth it sails —struck by the band as lightly and softly as a feather, but with such a rapldly irregular course that no one can tell exactly where it is going! Fun!—well try it and see!

For those who have not already played it, briefly outlined, the idea of the game is this: Any number can play. One of the “Pillow-Dex” balloons Is inflated, and the party is divided Into two teams, or sides, separated by a line placed on the carpet, or down the center of a dining-room table. The “Pillow-Dex” balloon is knocked lightly into the air, and struck back and forth. Don't let It land on your side of the line; if it does, it is a point for your opponents. Strike it back! The side getting ten points first wins the game.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
122
published in · 
Washington Post
date · 
12 November 1911
title · 
Thousands of Games
subtitle · 
Conveniently Arranged For Ease in Buying
by · 
S. Kann, Sons & Co.
citation · 
section 3 • page 1 • column 4 (near bottom)
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Black and white illustration of the Milton Bradley game, "GAME OF TIDDLEDY WINKS", // EXTRA FINE EDITION "IVORY WINKS" //, (Rick Tucker Tiddlywinks # BRA-15 or BRA-16)

Tiddledy Winks—the great evening game for both young and old; this one with glass cups and bone counters for 25c

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
notability rating · 
minor but interesting
tw-ref-ID · 
3776
published in · 
Washington Post
date · 
17 December 1911
title · 
Six More Shopping Days
subtitle · 
Thousands of Games to Suit Every Taste
by · 
S. Kann, Sons & Co.
citation · 
page 43 (may be continuous from front page) • column 5 (near bottom)
content

Games at 5c.

Tiddledy Winks.

Games at 10c.

Tiddledy Winks.

collection · 
digitized image PDF (NATwA)
notability rating · 
very minor
tw-ref-ID · 
3777
published in · 
Washington Post
date · 
12 May 1958
title · 
Tiddly-Winks Sweeping Britain; Commons, Oxford Busy Snapping
citation · 
page A1
collection · 
photocopy (NATwA)
tw-ref-ID · 
123
published in · 
Washington Post
date ·